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Today's News

  • Local resident played key role in heat pipe technology

    (Second of a two-part series)
    Project Manager Steve Huebner delights in demonstrating the new solar thermal domestic hot water heat pipe design for the Justice Center and the Animal Shelter. When he started explaining the design to Capital Projects Division Manager Daniel Erickson, he was astounded when Erickson said, “My dad made the first working heat pipe. He used to work on them in our garage.”

    In 1963, Physicist George Grover came up with the idea for a modern heat pipe, inspired by earlier inventions such as the Perkins Tube used in locomotive boilers and ovens. Grover was a physicist, not an experimentalist, and did not know how to implement his idea. He confided the idea to T. P. Cotter, one of his team members, and swore him to secrecy.

  • WR visitor center costs skyrocket

    The Los Alamos County Council tackled an ambitious agenda during a regular session Tuesday. Here is a recap of pivotal council action taken during the meeting with more in-depth coverage of key issues in Thursday’s edition:
    • Council voted 4-3 to approve an additional $1,127,697 for the construction of the White Rock Visitors Center project and awarded the contract for $2,464,000 plus gross receipts tax to Gerald Martin. Councilors Vincent Chiravalle, Geoff Rodgers and David Izraelevitz voted against the motion.

  • Lab officials speak out on CMRR

    The Chemistry Metallurgy Research Replacement facility was a hot topic of conversation Tuesday morning as the Los Alamos National Laboratory hosted a community leaders breakfast.

    During a question and answer session with lab director Charlie McMillan and NNSA Los Alamos Site Office head Kevin Smith, they were questioned by an individual, who asked  about the controversy surrounding the “new bomb factory” being built at CMRR.

    “It is not a bomb factory. We don’t make bombs up here,” McMillan said. “The weapons are put together in Texas. “We won’t make them in the new CMRR and we don’t make them at PF4.”

  • Autio offered Bernalillo County Attorney job

    The revolving door at the highest levels of Los Alamos County government continues to spin.

    “I can’t tell you I don’t have mixed feelings about this,” said Acting County Administrator Randy Autio about the news that he has been appointed county attorney in Bernalillo. “It was just so much harder than I imagined for my wife and I to be away from our family – Albuquerque really is our home.”

    Autio was one of nine candidates interviewed by Bernalillo County Commissioners last Thursday. In all, there were 18 applicants for the job that was vacated by Jeff Landers when his contract with the county lapsed in September.

  • Options to save Medicaid

    Everybody wants to save Medicaid.
    It’s the goal of Human Services Secretary Sidonie Squier and advocacy groups like Health Action New Mexico.
    But how they go about it sounds like a TV doctor show, with surgeons squabbling over a patient lying open on the table.
    A new study suggests savings in the program that covers the poor and disabled, without cutting.
    First, the numbers: One in four New Mexicans relies on Medicaid.
    In 2014, thanks to the president’s Affordable Care Act, the state could see 130,000 to 175,000 new enrollees, which will cost $330 million to $660 million more.
    However, the federal government will pay all of that cost for the first three years and 90 percent after that.

  • Yum Run is set for Saturday

    The annual Yum Run will return for its seventh year Saturday.
    The Yum Run, a 5K and 10K race, along with a 1K fun run/walk is the primary fundraising event for the local charity LA Cares. It starts and ends near Ruby K’s bagel shop downtown.
    As of Tuesday night, the event had 65 participants and organizers are expecting more than 100 runners and walkers to take part.
    Despite having plenty of participants, the race’s atmosphere is decidedly low-key.
    “It’s very laid back,” said June Gladney of LA Cares. “It’s very fun.”
    Former notable local senior athlete, as well as LA Cares volunteer Aaron Goldman, helped organize the first Yum Run in 2005.

  • West Virginia will join Big 12

    The Big 12 has a replacement lined up for Missouri before it even leaves the conference.
    Acting quickly to make sure it maintains a 10-member lineup, the Big 12 approved bringing in West Virginia to replace Missouri when the Tigers complete their move to the Southeastern Conference, a person with knowledge of the decision said Tuesday.
    The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the Big 12 had not announced that the conference board of directors on Monday unanimously approved inviting West Virginia when Missouri’s spot comes open.

     

  • Officer scores 1st round KO

    Los Alamos Police Department’s Lt. Jason Wardlow-Herrera knocked out Grant Lundquist of Santa Fe County’s fire department with a big right in the first round Saturday.
    Wardlow-Herrera took part in the Rumble in the Rio boxing matches Saturday. The event was held at the Santa Ana Star Casino near Bernalillo.
    The fights are an annual charity event that feature first-responders from around the state. Police officers won eight of the 12 fights on the card this year.
    With Wardlow-Herrera’s knockout — the only KO of the night —the event’s roving trophy will be delivered to LAPD Friday. LAPD will have the trophy for the next year.

  • LA finishes its fall slate at Santa Fe

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper boys golf team finished third in its final tournament of the fall 2011 season Monday.
    Los Alamos played at the Marty Sanchez Links de Santa Fe Monday. Monday’s tournament, however, was actually hosted by the Hobbs Eagles — Hobbs is located in the extreme southeastern part of the state.
    The Hilltoppers shot a 399 overall. Only one Hilltopper was able to break 100, however. Freshman Johnny Osden finished with a 92.
    Los Alamos head coach Mike Lippiatt said his team actually played most of the round better than its 399 would indicate, but there were a few blow-ups on the day that knocked scores up considerably.

  • Autio gets nod to become Bernalillo County Attorney

    Interim Los Alamos County Administrator Randy Autio may be heading back down south soon.

    Bernallilo County Commissioners tapped Autio to become the county attorney in a meeting Tuesday. Autio emerged as the top candidate from among a field of 18 applicants.

    Autio's salary and contract have yet to be negotiated.

    Autio came to Los Alamos in mid-2010 as the new county attorney hired to replace Mary McInerny who retired from the post. By December, Autio found himself elevated to interim county administrator after Anthony Mortillaro's contract with the county was terminated.