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Today's News

  • Petraeus says Taliban's military momentum stalled

    WASHINGTON (AP) — In his first formal assessment of the war in Afghanistan, Gen. David Petraeus said Tuesday that much of the Taliban's battlefield momentum has been halted, putting the U.S. on course to begin pulling out troops in July and shifting security responsibility to the Afghans.

  • Officials impose no-fly zone over damaged Japanese nuclear plant

    TOKYO (AP) — Japan's transport ministry says it has imposed a no-fly zone over a 20-mile (30-kilometer) radius around the stricken Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant.

    Ministry spokesman Hiroaki Katsuma said the decision was made Tuesday because of fears that radioactive particles leaking from the complex into the atmosphere could enter passing aircraft.

    The no-fly zone does not apply to helicopters that may be deployed to spray water over a reactor where a spent fuel storage pool is feared to be overheating.

  • Amid high demand, states cut mental health care

    DENVER (AP) — At the Ohio Department of Mental Health, Christy Murphy's days are filled with calls from people seeking help she can't seem to give.

    They plead with her, but budget cuts have trimmed services so much that she is not sure where to send them.

  • Japan feeds more money to banks as stocks slump

    TOKYO (AP) — Japan's central bank pumped billions more into the financial system Tuesday to quell fears that the country's banks could be overwhelmed by the impact of the massive earthquake and tsunami. Stocks slumped for a second day as a nuclear crisis escalated.

    Two cash injections totaling 8 trillion yen ($98 billion) came a day after the Bank of Japan fed a record 15 trillion yen ($184 billion) into money markets and eased monetary policy to support the economy in the aftermath of Friday's 9.0 magnitude quake that has killed thousands.

  • Fed says economic recovery on firmer footing

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve expressed more confidence in the U.S. economy even as Japan's nuclear crisis raised worries around the globe.

    The Fed said the economic recovery is on "firmer footing" and the jobs market is "improving gradually," in a statement released after its meeting Tuesday.

  • Big rock night for Diamond, Cooper, Waits and others

    NEW YORK (AP) — The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's annual induction ceremony is the only place you'd find Bruce Springsteen as just one member of a 21-piece backup band.

    The rock hall's latest class brought together Neil Diamond, Alice Cooper, Tom Waits, Darlene Love, Dr. John and Leon Russell, and after all the speeches were done the musicians kept playing until the wee hours.

  • Petraeus to give upbeat view of Afghan fight

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The top U.S. commander in Afghanistan is facing an impatient and frustrated Congress, balancing his troops' solid progress in combat with worries about Kabul government corruption, an expected Taliban resurgence this spring and the slow development of Afghan security forces.

  • Japan emergency workers race to avert meltdown

    FUKUSHIMA, Japan (AP) — Emergency workers forced to retreat from a tsunami-stricken Japanese nuclear power plant when radiation levels soared prepared to return Wednesday night after emissions dropped to safer levels.

    The pullback cost precious time in the fight to prevent a nuclear meltdown, further escalating a crisis spawned by last week's devastating earthquake and tsunami that pulverized Japan's northeastern coast and likely killed more than 10,000 people.

  • Japanese agency: Another explosion heard at nuclear plant

    SOMA, Japan (AP) — A third explosion in four days rocked the earthquake-damaged Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant in northeast Japan early Tuesday, the country's nuclear safety agency said.

    The blast at Dai-ichi Unit 2 followed two hydrogen explosions at the plant — the latest on Monday — as authorities struggle to prevent the catastrophic release of radiation in the area devastated by a tsunami.

  • Aflac dumps duck voice actor for tasteless tweets

    COLUMBUS, Ga. (AP) — Aflac Inc. said Monday it has fired Gilbert Gottfried, the abrasive voice of the insurer's quacking duck in the U.S., after the comedian posted a string of mocking jokes about the earthquake and tsunami in Japan on Twitter over the weekend.

    The tasteless tweets are particularly problematic for Aflac because it does 75 percent of its business in Japan. One in four homes in Japan buys health insurance from Aflac. The insurer's CEO, Daniel Amos, flew to Japan on Sunday to show support for the company's employees and agents.