Today's News

  • A rugged road to statehood

    The lands within New Mexico have been a center of exploration for centuries; yet it only claimed its statehood one hundred years ago this week.

  • Celebrating the history of Los Alamos townsite

    As the state celebrates its 100th anniversary today, Los Alamos also celebrates a diverse and exciting past. Known predominately for the Manhattan Era, few outsiders know that much more occurred here over the past century than the building of the atomic bomb.

    During the time of statehood, Los Alamos was occupied by only a handful of families attempting to farm and maintain ranches on the mesas. Only a few rudimentary roads traveled the precipitous paths across the steep mesas and deep canyons of the Pajarito Plateau.

    Historical accounts report trips to Santa Fe and Espanola taking at least a day, sometimes requiring an overnight stop along the way - a trip that frustrates the modern traveler if it exceeds 30 minutes.

  • Update 01-06-12

    CIP meeting

    The Parks Division will hold a CIP Phase I Public meeting at 5:30 p.m. Thursday at the Betty Ehart Senior Center to discuss the Renovation and Rebuild of the Ashley Pond Capital Improvement Project.

    Council meeting

     The Los Alamos County Council will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday in Council Chambers.


    A public meeting for Community Broadband Network will be at 5:30 p.m., Jan. 12 at Fuller Lodge.

    Arts meeting

     The Arts in Public Places board meeting will be at 4:30 p.m. Jan. 11, at Mesa Public Library.

    Moonlight snowshoe

  • Los Alamos hosts debate competition

    Bethlehem Evangelical Lutheran Church is hosting a qualifying tournament for the National Christian Forensics and Communications Association (NCFCA) through Saturday.
    Forty-one competitors from New Mexico, Utah, Colorado and Montana, ranging from 12 to 18 years of age, are competing for a space at the Regional Invitational. Top competitors in that event go on to the National Championship.
    NCFCA was founded in 2001, and calls itself “the oldest and most established home school forensics league in the country.” Approximately 2,000 families are in the league.

  • Hecker: N. Korea Remains Shrouded in Mystery

    The conference hall at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints Thursday was packed with people wanting to hear Siegfried S. Hecker’s assessment of North Korea’s future following the Dec. 17 death of Kim Jong Il.

    “I could make this the shortest talk I’ve ever delivered because the answer is – I don’t know – and either does anybody else,” Hecker said.

    Hecker is a former director of Los Alamos National Laboratory who now directs the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University.

    He is considered a leading expert on North Korea having made seven annual trips in a row to the isolated country through 2010.

  • Lab, NMED reach cleanup pact

    George Rael, the assistant manager for environmental programs at the NNSA Los Alamos Site Office, admitted to the Northern New Mexico Citizens Advisory Board Thursday what a fair amount of people already surmised.

    “It’s not possible for DOE to meet the Consent Order in 2015,” Rael told the group assembled for the meeting at the Cities of Gold Hotel Conference Center.

    Rael said budget cuts, technical challenges and a shift in priorities have caused the lack of progress on cleanup.

    The New Mexico Environment Department, however, said it was not changing the deadline.

  • Good luck grappling with legacy issues

    It is good to read in the Los Alamos Monitor (Nov.  22-23) that environmental remediation at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is starting to shift its emphasis.  
    A bias for action is starting to replace the New Mexico Environment Department’s (NMED) need to study things to death.
    In the first six years of the compliance order on consent, studies NMED required LANL to perform cost about $900 million and consumed more than 90 percent of the total budget for those years.   
    LANL already had 35 years of study and research before the order. NMED Secretary F. David Martin and the Martinez administration have a real challenge to reverse the NMED “bring me another rock” syndrome.

  • And so it begins...

    The sun rises in the morning. Breakfasts are scarfed down and drivers crowd the roads battling their way to work.  
    Shoppers hunt for bargains as food prices rise and paychecks are cut. Tired and frustrated workers on their way home curse as they sit in traffic jams.  
    Overcooked dinners are eaten while watching  reruns of “Housewives of Bayonne.”  
    Kids play video games as their homework collects dust. The sun shrugs and sinks out of sight, and the day comes to a close.
    A new year greets us with pretty much the same old same old, routines we’ve learned to master without having to exert any thought.  
    A new year, a new beginning, and the same old garbage we’re fed each day.

  • People in the News 01-06-12

    DECORA, Iowa – Jessica Mietz, a 2008 graduate of Los Alamos High School, earned a varsity letter at the annual Luther College cross-country banquet last month.
    During the 2011 season, Luther finished second at the Iowa Conference championships and went on to finish fifth at the NCAA Division-III Central Regional. The Norse received an at-large bid to the National Championships where they finished 23rd.
    Luther’s appearance at the national championships was its 12th in school history and sixth time in the past eight years.

  • Hang Time

    Los Alamos’ Nate Carver elevates for a layup during a Dec. 8 game against Sandia. Los Alamos hosts Santa Fe Prep Saturday afternoon.