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Today's News

  • Girls tennis: LA earns 2 wins in 3 chances at Taos

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper girls tennis team went 2-1 at this weekend’s Taos Quadrangular.
    The two-day quadrangular was held Friday and Saturday. Los Alamos hosted Española Valley in the first match Friday at home, then faced off against Taos and Farmington in the other two rounds Saturday at the Quail Ridge Inn at Taos.
    The Hilltoppers had little trouble with either Española Valley or Taos, picking up 17 wins in 18 contests. However, against two-timed defending state Class 4A champion Farmington, a team very well positioned to make another state title run in 2011, the Hilltoppers finished on the blank side of a 9-0 shutout.

  • Water shortage could impact NM's chili crop

    LAS CRUCES (AP) — An expected dry growing season could hurt the chili crop in southern New Mexico.

    There's a shortage of river water in Dona Ana County and a lack of a good groundwater supply in the Hatch area.

    Growers also say they're leaning toward planting cotton instead because of the water outlook. Cotton takes less water.

    Hatch vegetable farmer Jerry Franzoy says cotton looks especially favorable because it's experiencing a market boom this year.

  • Long blackouts pose risk to US reactors

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Long before the nuclear emergency in Japan, U.S. regulators knew that a power failure lasting for days at an American nuclear plant, whatever the cause, could lead to a radioactive leak. Even so, they have only required the nation's 104 nuclear reactors to develop plans for dealing with much shorter blackouts on the assumption that power would be restored quickly.

  • Syrian Cabinet resigns amid unrest

    DAMASCUS, Syria (AP) — Syria's Cabinet resigned Tuesday to help quell a wave of popular fury that erupted more than a week ago, threatening President Bashar Assad's 11-year rule in one of the most authoritarian nations in the Middle East.

    Assad, whose family has controlled Syria for four decades, is trying to calm the growing dissent with a string of overtures. He is expected to address the nation in the next 24 hours to lift emergency laws in place since 1963 and moving to annul other harsh restrictions on civil liberties and political freedoms.

  • Syrian Cabinet resigns amid unrest

    DAMASCUS, Syria (AP) — Syria's Cabinet resigned Tuesday to help quell a wave of popular fury that erupted more than a week ago, threatening President Bashar Assad's 11-year rule in one of the most authoritarian nations in the Middle East.

    Assad, whose family has controlled Syria for four decades, is trying to calm the growing dissent with a string of overtures. He is expected to address the nation in the next 24 hours to lift emergency laws in place since 1963 and moving to annul other harsh restrictions on civil liberties and political freedoms.

  • Stocks struggle higher despite weak housing news

    NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks edged higher Tuesday, overcoming earlier losses from weak reports on consumer confidence and home prices.

    Home Depot Inc. rose 2.7 percent, the most of the 30 large companies in the Dow Jones industrial average. The retailer said it would buy $1 billion of its own stock with cash from selling bonds.

    Stocks started lower after a report showed that home prices fell in 19 of the 20 large U.S. cities tracked by the S&P/Case-Shiller index. Washington was the only city in which prices rose. Prices have fallen 3 percent in the past year.

  • Home prices falling in most major US cities

    NEW YORK (AP) — Home prices are falling in most major U.S. cities, and the average prices in four of them are at their lowest point in 11 years. Analysts expect further prices declines in most cities in the coming months.

    The Standard & Poor's/Case-Shiller 20-city index released Tuesday shows price declines in 19 cities from December to January. Eleven of them are at their lowest level since the housing bust, in 2006 and 2007. The index fell for the sixth straight month.

    Home values in Atlanta, Las Vegas, Detroit and Cleveland are now below January 2000 levels.

    The only market where prices rose was Washington, where homes prices gained 0.1 percent month over month.

  • Gunmen kill 56 in grisly Iraq hostage siege

    BAGHDAD (AP) — Wearing military uniforms over explosives belts, gunmen held a local Iraqi government center hostage Tuesday in a grisly siege that ended with the deaths of at least 56 people, including three councilmen who were executed with gunshots to the head.

    The five-hour standoff in Tikrit, former dictator Saddam Hussein's home town, ended only when the attackers blew themselves up in one of the bloodiest days in Iraqi this year.

    First they set fire to the bodies of the three slain Salahuddin province councilmen in a brutal, defiant show of how insurgents still render Iraq unstable — even if it has so far escaped the political unrest rolling across the Arab world.

  • Kan: Japan on 'maximum alert' over nuke crisis--video added

    TOKYO (AP) — Japan's leader insisted Tuesday that the country was on "maximum alert" to bring its nuclear crisis under control, but the spread of radiation raised concerns about the ability of experts to stabilize the crippled reactor complex.

    Wan but resolute, Prime Minister Naoto Kan told parliament that Japan was grappling with its worst problems since World War II.

    "This quake, tsunami and the nuclear accident are the biggest crises for Japan" in decades, Kan said, dressed in one of the blue work jackets that have become ubiquitous among bureaucrats since the tsunami. He said the crises remained unpredictable, but added: "From now on, we will continue to handle it in a state of maximum alert."

  • FACT CHECK: How Obama's Libya claims fit the facts

    EDITOR'S NOTE: An occasional look at statements by political leaders and how well they adhere to the facts.
    WASHINGTON (AP) — There may be less than meets the eye to President Barack Obama's statements Monday night that NATO is taking over from the U.S. in Libya and that U.S. action is limited to defending people under attack there by Moammar Gadhafi's forces.

    In transferring command and control to NATO, the U.S. is turning the reins over to an organization dominated by the U.S., both militarily and politically. In essence, the U.S. runs the show that is taking over running the show.