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Today's News

  • Church Listings 08-17-12

    Baha’i Faith
    For information, e-mail losalamosla@gmail.com. For general information, call the Baha’i Faith phone at 1-800-228-6483.

    Bethlehem Lutheran
    Bethlehem Evangelical Lutheran Church, a member of the ELCA is located at 2390 North Road, 662-5151; see a map at bethluth.com. Summer worship at 9 a.m., fellowship with refreshments following at 10:15 a.m. The preaching is biblical, the music is lively, children are welcome and abundant and a well-staffed nursery is provided.  All are welcome. Come join the Family.

    Bryce Ave. Presbyterian
    The church is located at 3333 Bryce Ave. The Rev. Henry Fernandez preaches, bapca.org, info@bapca.org. For information, call 672-3364.

    Buddhist
    Kannon Zendo, 35 Barranca Road. kannonzendo.org. Henry Chigen Finney, 661-6874. Meditation in the Zen tradition will be offered Wednesday evenings at the Kannon Zendo in Los Alamos.

    Calvary Chapel
    Sunday school classes for all ages at 9:15 a.m. Join us at 10:30 a.m. for worship and a study of the Biblical Jesus as He relates to people in our look at the Gospel of Exodus.

    The Christian Church

  • Ask Fr. John: Understanding ethnicity and orthodoxy

    Why do people think that Orthodoxy is an ethnic thing?  — B.A.

    Christianity is not of this world. It is about heaven. It is about a tangible encounter with the living God. Thus, the more connected to Christ himself and to the fullness of belief and spirit, the more it will seem foreign to the worldly, regardless of ethnicity.
    As we know, the apostles and their disciples went to different countries and proclaimed the good-news of Christ. As semitic people, they must have appeared foreign to all they met, but this external didn’t prevent the people.
    As a result of massive growth, gatherings of Orthodox Christians continuing as the ancient church, became identified with nationality. Thus, the orthodox believers within the nation of Greece, became known as “Greek Orthodox.”
    We know that the Greeks were the missionaries to Russia. They proclaimed Orthodox Christianity and naturally had a Greek “flavor.”
    It would have been easy for Russians to think, “Oh, that’s that foreign religion. We don’t go there.”

  • Local Courts: On the Docket 08-17-12

    August 7

    • Seaux L. Michelle was found guilty in Los Alamos County Magistrate court of driving while under the influence of liquor and/or drugs.
    Judge Pat Casados ordered Michelle to pay $241 in court costs and undergo supervised probation for 364 days.
    Probation conditions are: avoid being arrested or convicted of any other offense and compliance with all court orders concerning probation; defendant is required to enter and complete an alcohol/drug counseling program and complete at least six sessions; complete DWI school within 90 days; complete the Victim Impact Program within 90 days and have an ignition interlock device installed on all vehicles driven by Michelle.
    Michelle’s also not allowed to possess or consume alcohol or enter an establishment where liquor is served while on probation.
    Michelle cannot possess or own a weapon while on probation. Michelle must also meet with his probation officer within seven days and maintain contact as required. Michelle will also perform 24 hours community service under the supervision of a probation officer.

    • Luis Ponce Chitica was found guilty in Los Alamos County Magistrate Court of driving with an expired registration plate and without evidence of registration.
    He was ordered to pay $142 in court fees.

  • Posse Lodge wins historic status

    Supporters of the Los Alamos Sheriff’s Posse Shack (now called the Los Alamos Sheriff’s Posse Lodge) won their bid to have the lodge placed on the State Historic Register. The New Mexico Cultural Properties Review Committee approved the petition last Friday.
    Posse Lodge President Carey Grzadinski is behind the effort to place the lodge on the historic registry and supplied much of the historical information about the building. Kelly Myers began preliminary investigations into the requirements for registry.
    The project was turned over to Debe Braden in February. Braden did the bulk of the research and developed the presentation for the review committee. She searched the library, Los Alamos Historical Society records and spoke to anyone who might have information about the Posse or the lodge.
    “I told my kids I thought I was doing a term paper,” Braden said. “When I was doing all this, I thought, I should have been an investigative reporter, because it’s really fun to dig and find facts and one thing leads to another. I’ve enjoyed that a lot.”
    The name, the Posse Shack, as it is known to most locals, derives from the building’s original incarnation.

  • Chile roasting season has arrived

    Matt Romero said his chile is hot, but his wife is hotter. Recently at the Los Alamos Farmer’s Market, Romero sold chiles in sandwich-sized bags to spread the love around to all. Romero will sell full bushels after Labor Day and will roast about 44 bushels per market at that time. Romero Farms also sells a variety of vegetables including eight different types of egg plant.

  • Update 08-17-12

    Waffle breakfast

    There will be a Masonic Waffle Breakfast 7:30-10 a.m. Saturday at the Los Alamos Masonic Lodge, 15th and Canyon. Proceeds benefit Habitat for Humanity’s 2012 Jimmy and Rosalyn Carter Work Project in Haiti. Price of the breakfast is $7 and $3 for children age six and younger.

    Triathlon time

    The Los Alamos County Triathlon will take place at 7 a.m. Saturday, beginning at the Aquatic Center. See more details on page 8.

    Groundbreaking

    The public is invited to join the county council for the groundbreaking event for the new Golf Course Community Building at 11:30 a.m. Aug. 24, at the building site. Refreshments will be served.

    Shrimp boil

    The American Legion will host the Operation Wounded Warrior Benefit shrimp boil dinner from 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday. There will also be a raffle for goodies and a 50/50 drawing, along with entertainment by Todd Tijerina from 7-11 p.m. Cost of the dinner is $10.

    High tea

    Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church will present a high tea and fashion show event at 2:30 p.m. Saturday at 3900 Trinity Dr. All proceeds go toward the two-house build trips to Juaréz in the fall.

  • Super Blitz wraps up with sobriety checkpoints

    Just because summer is almost over, don’t think the state and local police are slowing up on their DWI checkpoint strategy.
    On the contrary, state and local law enforcement plan to be ever more vigilant now that school and related school activities have started up again. They are also keeping an eye on Labor Day Weekend as well.
    According to a press release issued by the New Mexico Department of Public Safety, the state police plan on running their program through Sept. 4, and some of those checkpoints may include state roads leading into Los Alamos.
    “During this final summer Super Blitz, state police officers throughout New Mexico will conduct 25 sobriety checkpoints and 67 DWI saturation patrols to deter drunk driving and arrest those who choose to drive after drinking,” said a statement in the release.
    On the local side, Deputy Chief Kevin Purtymun also said the LAPD may run some checkpoints too, though he couldn’t specifically say where.
    He also said residents may want to know that the checkpoints aren’t where they make most of their arrests.
    “We’re fairly consistent in that we make about 50 to 60 DWI arrests a year,” said Purtyman. “But, from the number of checkpoints we do a year, we only make one or two arrests.”

  • Bishop to lead LANL STE Directorate

    Los Alamos National Laboratory Director Charles McMillan announced Friday that after a yearlong, nationwide search, Alan Bishop has been selected to be the laboratory’s next principal associate director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). Bishop has been acting in that role since Aug. 29, 2011.

    Over the course of a distinguished 30-year career as a research scientist and leader, Bishop has more than 700 publications in archival journals and has served as a guest scientist, guest scholar and visiting professor.

    He has received Distinguished Fellow awards from the American Physical Society, Humboldt Foundation, the Institute of Physics and American Association for the Advancement of Science and Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    “Alan is uniquely qualified to help shape the laboratory’s future. He has skillfully guided this critical and complex organization through challenging and uncertain times,” McMillan said.

    Bishop came to Los Alamos in 1979 and has been a group leader, division leader and finally associate director for Theory, Simulation and Computation before being named acting principal associate director for Science, Technology and Engineering last year.

  • LAHS students get a taste of the 'suite' life

    If all goes according plan, the students at Los Alamos High School will end the school year as masters of an Internet program that has the potential to benefit them long after they’ve graduated.

    At a recent school board meeting, Dean Obermeyer, the school district’s technology coordinator, introduced “Google Apps for Education” to the board.

    In a written statement, Obermeyer described Google Apps for Education as a “free suite of applications including email, calendar, word processing, spreadsheets, presentations, document storage and many more.”

    One of the first questions the board asked was, “why?”

    Obermeyer and the teachers that came to support him, told the board that it was all about efficiency, security and consistency.

    “The only method students have of moving documents between school and home is with a physical drive or by email,” Obermeyer said.

    One teacher told the board that having a platform that students and teachers share makes life easier for everyone involved.

    She said one great function in Google Apps is the “documents” feature.

  • A rose by any other name …

    It all depends on how one looks at it.

    Some are saying the Department of Energy is actually paying some anti-nuclear groups to raise awareness about environmental cleanup.

    The anti-nuclear groups are saying they would never receive any money from DOE and they are receiving funds through grants provided by the New Mexico Community Foundation.

    But here is the fact.

    Through a partnership with the Department of Energy, the New Mexico Community Foundation launched the Community Involvement Fund last year.

    And according to the NMCF website, the five-year agreement was intended to increase public awareness and participation in the DOE’s environmental cleanup at nuclear waste sites nationwide.

    In 2011, grants totaled $797,991 with recipient organizations in the states of New Mexico, Vermont, Idaho, New York, Nevada, Georgia, Tennessee, California, Maryland and Washington.

    Taking advantage of the grants was a variety of anti-nuclear groups in this state.

    They include the Alliance for Nuclear Accountability in Santa Fe, Citizens for Alternatives to Radioactive Dumping in Albuquerque and the Southwest Research and Information Center in Albuquerque. Partnering with SRIC are the Concerned Citizens for Nuclear Safety and Nuclear Watch New Mexico in Santa Fe.