.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Learn about biological resource management

    Come to Pajarito Environmental Education Center at 7 p.m. Oct. 10 to hear about the Biological Resource Management Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Chuck Hathcock will talk about the lab’s compliance with environmental laws and the plan to protect sensitive species found on lab property.
    The biological resource management teams at LANL assess the status of a variety of organisms on LANL property, including some with threatened or endangered statuses.  
    The team then reports back about how to best manage the biological resources involved.  They have surveyed many different species, including the Jemez Mountain salamander, Rio Grande chub and numerous bird and bat species. LANL scientists often call upon the biology division at the lab to give advice on proposed plans that may pose a threat to the local flora and fauna.
    Hathcock is a wildlife biologist at LANL with more than 15 years of experience in the field. Hathcock and his colleagues have documented many important reports on the biology found in and around LANL.
    His research focuses primarily on songbird population demographics. Outside of work, Hathcock is an avid naturalist and hiker and can be found most weekends birding, bird banding or traveling.  

  • A ‘paddler’s perspective’

    Paul Bauer presents a geo-photo-journey down the northern Rio Grande, emphasizing the river hydrogeology and the evolution of the sublime landscape, during his presentation, “Down the Rio Grande: A Paddler’s Perspective of Rocks and Rapids,” at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 9 at Fuller Lodge.
    The talk is part of the Los Alamos Historical Society’s 2012-2013 lecture series, “History and Science.”
    Bauer shares his thoughts on the birth and adolescence of the river, where it gets its water and its system of springs.
    He explores the geologic setting of rapids along the river, the Tertiary battles between water and lava, and tidbits of riverside human history as diverse as gold mining and astronaut training.
    Bauer is a principal geologist and associate director at the New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources at New Mexico Tech.
    He received a doctorate in geology from New Mexico Tech in 1988.
    He served as manager of the state’s Geologic Mapping Program for 12 years, and was program coordinator for the New Mexico Decision-Makers Field Conferences for 10 years, a program designed to bridge the gap between earth scientists and policy makers.  
    He has spent much of the last 30 years investigating the geology and hydrogeology of north-central New Mexico.

  • LASO fall concert Friday

    Familiar tunes, percussive street sounds, cowboy music of the Wild West and soaring melodies —  these will be part of the Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra’s Fall Concert at 7 p.m. Friday at the Crossroads Bible Church.  
    In his second year as music director for LASO, conductor Dr. Ivan Shulman will lead the orchestra in a concert tour.
    The Brahms “Academic Festival Overture” will open the concert. Composed as a thank you note to the University of Breslau, after receiving an honorary doctorate, Brahms included a variety of college drinking songs. Always the curmudgeonly joker, these appear loose and episodic — in a sort of “tongue in cheek” structure.
    Violinist Roberta Arruda, originally from Brazil, will solo in the Saint-Saens Violin Concerto No. 3. Saint-Saens has been described as the “compleat Frenchman” — accomplished pianist, organist, prolific author on many subjects, linguist, raconteur and world traveler.
     “I produce music like an apple tree produces apples,” Saint-Saens said. His third violin concerto is one of his most popular works.

  • Artists share their interpretations of 'Needles and Pins'

    When the phrase “Needles and Pins” is muttered, it sometimes brings to mind the old saying about waiting on needles and pins. It also can bring to mind the Ramones punk rock song of the same name. But on Friday, it will also be associated with art.
    “Needles and Pins” opens with a reception from 5-7 p.m. Friday. The exhibit is part of the Arts Crawl, which will include events at Mesa Public Library, the Los Alamos Historical Museum and Karen Wray Fine Art.
    Artists’ interpretations of a subject are as varied as the pieces they create. This show challenged artists to think outside the box and present their views of needles and pins. The results might be surprising.
    In a state well known for fibers arts and artists, it shouldn’t be surprising that there were myriad entries. However, the show is about more than creating clothing and quilts  — though there are some pieces included. Everything from a pin dome by Los Alamos artist Darla Graff, to  K.C. Coe’s “Ashley Pond Basket” will be on display.

  • Money-saving tips on open enrollment

    Over the next few weeks, millions of Americans will receive their 2013 open enrollment materials. Although it’s tempting to simply check “same as last year,” that can be a costly mistake – especially if your employer is offering different benefit plans next year or your family or income situation has changed.
    Plus, an important feature of health care flexible spending accounts, which many people use to reduce their tax bite, is changing next year (more on that below).
    Here’s what to look for when reviewing your benefit options:
    Many benefit plans – especially medical – change coverage details from year to year. If you’re offered more than one plan, compare features side by side (including plans offered by your spouse’s employer) to ensure you’re choosing the best alternative. Common changes include:
    • Dropping or replacing unpopular or overly expensive plans.
    • Increased monthly premiums for employee and/or dependent coverage.
    • Increased deductible and/or copayment amounts for doctor visits, prescription drugs, hospitalization, dental or vision benefits, etc.
    • Revised drug formularies.
    • Doctors and hospitals sometimes withdraw from a plan’s preferred provider network.

  • ‘A moral adventure’

    Enraged, many times, has been the reaction on the part of former Sen. Pete Domenici to hearing priests from his Catholic Church talk about business and entrepreneurship. Domenici shared this bit of his history as a way of saying how pleased he was to have found a priest — Rev. Robert Sirico — to talk to Catholic New Mexico about entrepreneurship via his Domenici Public Policy Conference.
    The presentation from Sirico was part of moving the Pete V. Domenici Institute for Public Policy at New Mexico State University in the direction of helping New Mexicans understand free enterprise and entrepreneurship. The rationale for moving toward entrepreneurship is simple, Domenici said. It is the dearth of entrepreneurship on the part of New Mexicans.
    The conference was Sept. 19 and 20 in Las Cruces. Sirico was the only male on the Sept. 19 program. Sirico heads the Acton Institute of Grand Rapids, Mich. The Institute’s mission, its newsletter says, “is to promote a free and virtuous society characterized by individual liberty and sustained by religious principles.”
    Domenici charged Sirico with teaching Catholic priests the capitalist system.

  • Miguel Cabrera nabs MLB’s Triple Crown

    KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Miguel Cabrera had just achieved baseball immortality, and everyone around him knew it.
    Tigers manager Jim Leyland had tears welling in his eyes. General manager Dave Dombrowski kept trying to remind people to stop and enjoy the moment. Prince Fielder simply shook his head in disbelief at the history that had unfolded.
    Less than an hour earlier, in the midst of Detroit’s otherwise meaningless 1-0 victory over Kansas City, it had finally become official: Cabrera had won the Triple Crown.
    “Everybody said to me it was unbelievable. They were all excited to see this, enjoy this, be a part of something big,” he said, taking the rare feat in stride better than anyone.
    Cabrera finished the regular-season hitting .330 with 44 homers and 139 RBIs, leading the American League in all three statistical categories, making him just the 15th player to achieve the Triple Crown and the first since Boston’s Carl Yastrzemski in 1967.
    “I’ve managed a lot of players, managed some great ones, but I’ve never seen anything like this,” Leyland said. “When you’re sitting back and it’s over with, people are talking about Miguel Cabrera, the rest of the world will have no idea who his manager was, but I will.”

  • Sports Update 10-04-12

    Pickleball group playing at YMCA

     

    The Family YMCA of Los Alamos is hosting an afternoon pickleball group at its gymnasium.

    Pickleball is a tennis-like sport which uses wood paddles and a Whiffle ball that's played on a badminton court.

    The pickleball group meets Tuesdays and Thursdays at the YMCA. Price for participation is $5 for YMCA members, $10 for nonmembers.

    More information on the group is available by calling the YMCA at 662-3100.

     

    Yum Run returns Oct. 27

     

    The eighth annual Ruby K's Yum Run is scheduled for Oct. 27.

    The Yum Run includes a 5K run/walk event and a 10K run/walk, as well as a 1K non-competitive fun run. All races start and finish at Ruby K's on Central Avenue.

    Price for participation is $30 per person for the 5K and 10K races or $90 per family and $15 per person or $35 per family for the 1K. All proceeds from the races will go to benefit LA Cares.

    Entry forms are available online at rubykbagel.com or may be picked up at Ruby K's Los Alamos Fitness Center, the YMCA or Mesa Public Library.

     

    KRSN to air girls soccer game

     

    KRSN AM 1490 will broadcast tonight’s girls soccer game between Los Alamos and La Cueva.

  • State Notes 10-04-12

    Lobos named MW runners of week

  • LA sweeps Bernalillo to open 2-4A

    In dispatching one of its toughest foes with a bang Wednesday, the Los Alamos Hilltopper volleyball team earned a victory in its district opener.
    Los Alamos was dominant for two-plus sets and pulled things together well enough to close out the third set against the Bernalillo Spartans.
    The big hitters upfront were again on their game for the Hilltoppers, outgunning the Spartans at the net, while the Spartans’ biggest weapons had relatively quiet nights.
    The Hilltoppers were dominant in sets one and two, taking those 25-10 and 25-12.
    The Spartans regrouped after falling behind early in the final set, but the Hilltoppers, who started off the third set much the same way they had the first two, cooled off considerably, but still prevailed to take a 25-20 decision and claim the sweep.
    “In our first two games, our energy was really up,” Los Alamos libero Danielle Ortiz said. “We started off with a good lead, but in the third game we were a little relaxed. We started to let up a little bit, but we pulled through and we finished on a good note.”