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Today's News

  • Belen wins big vs. LA Friday

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper football team struggled to slow down the Belen Eagles in the first half of Friday’s home football game.

    The Eagles rolled up 269 yards total offense in the first half and scored two long touchdowns early to drop the Hilltoppers 46-15 at Sullivan Field.

    The Hilltoppers fell behind early, going down 19-0 just one play into the second quarter. They would bounce back in the second half with a pair of touchdowns, but would never get back into the ballgame.

    See more information on Friday’s game in Sunday’s edition of the Los Alamos Monitor.

  • A Harley ride through controlled burn area near Los Alamos 9/25/12
  • Holiday Toys: What's Hot This Season
  • Networks help build business

    When Gordon Johnston and his wife had trouble getting the fire extinguishers serviced at their Taos bed and breakfast about five years ago, Johnston decided to launch a part-time fire extinguisher business of his own.
    That one-time side venture is now the couple’s central enterprise, Alpine Fire Safety Systems Inc. Johnston credits Taos Entrepreneurial Network, or TEN, with the support and connections he needed to pursue the government contracts that have made his business such a success.
    TEN is an independent nonprofit organization of entrepreneurs and local community leaders that the McCune Charitable Foundation launched in 2004. TEN is now funded by Northern New Mexico Connect, which coordinates economic development projects for Los Alamos National Security LLC, operator of Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    After Johnston made a presentation to TEN’s board of directors, Christopher Madrid — the group’s former facilitator and now a volunteer — informed him of an upcoming seminar on federal contracting. “I had never considered federal contracting but went [to the seminar] with an open and curious mind,” he said. “About three years ago I received my first federal contract with the Veterans Administration in California. That contract will be up for a five-year renewal in January.”

  • Drill and kill

    Yeah yeah yeah, I can hear the energy baggers whining already.  Well back off, you oil addict freaks.  I’m not writing about drill baby drill.  We’ll fight that battle some other time (like maybe when you’re fighting over the last drop).
     No, my topic today is about drilling students.
      Years ago, I shared an article with my colleagues discussing the value of having students memorize mathematical basics (like the times table, common square roots, conversion between percentages and fractions) so that the students would have more “brain processing power” dedicated to working more complex concepts.  I was quickly “scolded” by an administrator who simply said “Drill drill drill! Kill kill kill!”
      This is a buzz-phrase one learns while getting a professional lobotomy.  It means, “If you force a student to memorize material, it kills their motivation to acquire knowledge through discovery and contextual relevance.”

  • Church Listings 09-28-12

    Baha’i Faith
    For information, e-mail losalamosla@gmail.com. For general information, call the Baha’i Faith phone at 1-800-228-6483.

    Bethlehem Lutheran
    Bethlehem Evangelical Lutheran Church, a member of the ELCA is at 2390 North Road. 662-5151, bethluth.com. Worship services are at 8:15 and 10:45 a.m., with coffee and doughnuts served between services during our Education Hour of classes for all ages. The preaching is biblical by our Pastors Bruce Kuenzel and Nicolé Ferry, the music is lively, children are welcome and abundant and a well-staffed nursery is provided.  All are welcome. Come Join the Family.

    Bryce Ave. Presbyterian
    The church is located at 3333 Bryce Ave. The Rev. Henry Fernandez preaches, bapca.org, info@bapca.org. For information, call 672-3364.

    Buddhist
    Kannon Zendo, 35 Barranca Road. kannonzendo.org. Henry Chigen Finney, 661-6874. Meditation in the Zen tradition will be offered Wednesday evenings at the Kannon Zendo in Los Alamos.

    Calvary Chapel
    Sunday school classes for all ages at 9:15 a.m. Join us at 10:30 a.m. for worship and a study of the Biblical Jesus as He relates to people in our look at the Gospel of Exodus.

    The Christian Church

  • Bible Answers: Making your relationship with Christ known

    “What is the benefit of publicly identifying that I am a Christian?”— Anonymous teen

    As a teenager, you may fear you will jeopardize your social position and popularity if you let it be known you have a genuine belief in Christ.
    There are good reasons for coming out as a Christian, however.
    For one thing, the Bible is quite clear that God expects his followers to own up to their faith.  
    Joshua minced no words when publicly declaring his allegiance to God (Josh. 24:15).  Jesus’ meaning was obvious when he said, “If you deny me before men I will deny you before my Father.” (Matt. 10:32-33).
    A living faith in a living God is clearly a private matter with a public face.
    Second, publicly identifying your faith is a matter of integrity; i.e., being true to yourself. Who you are, what you value, the choices you make, and how you relate to others are all a reflection of your core beliefs. Hiding your faith is essentially dishonest.
    Third, you probably won’t keep your faith a secret anyway because you will inevitably be drawn into a community of believers.
    The New Testament teaches that the Spirit of God who is present and active in each individual also establishes the corporate life of the church (Acts 2:42-47).

  • Officers recognized for service

    County Council recognized Deputy Chief Kevin Purtymun and Cpl. Doug Ehler for their years of service on Tuesday. Both officers are retiring from the Los Alamos Police Department. Left to right: Ehler’s fiancé Stephanie Scrimshaw, Cpl. Doug Ehler, Chief Wayne Torpy and Deputy Chief Kevin Purtymun.

  • State launches literacy website

    Gov. Susana Martinez announced that the state has launched a new website that will provide new support for parents and educators working to teach students how to read.
    The “New Mexico Reads to Lead” website provides information from across the country on the best strategies to help students with literacy. Unique support is available, in English and Spanish, for students at each grade level to provide targeted help for children no matter their current reading skill. In addition, the website will begin to collect proven strategies from New Mexico teachers to share with their colleagues across the state and also highlights community literacy programs which help support local reading efforts.
    Parents will have access to a recommended reading list for students at their child’s ability level. In April, Gov. Martinez announced the “New Mexico Reads to Lead” initiative, a direct investment in early childhood education and early childhood reading interventions designed to assist teachers and parents in identifying struggling students and helping them to read at grade level.

  • Report: NM gains initially with Medicaid expansion

    SANTA FE, (AP) — New Mexico’s costs of expanding Medicaid under the federal health care overhaul will be offset initially by additional tax revenues because of increased spending on medical services, according to a legislative committee analysis released Thursday.
    The Legislative Finance Committee released its staff projections as lawmakers began to consider what will be one of the biggest issues confronting Gov. Susana Martinez and the Legislature next year.
    Policymakers must decide whether the state can afford the long-term costs of expanding the eligibility of Medicaid to potentially cover nearly 170,000 low-income New Mexicans by 2020.
    About a fourth of the state’s population currently receives medical care through Medicaid, which covers uninsured children, the disabled and the poor. The state and federal government jointly finance Medicaid.
    The Human Services Department estimates it will cost the state about $413 million from 2014 through 2020 to expand Medicaid as called for under federal law. An additional $6 billion in federal money should flow into the state to cover those medical services during the same time.