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Today's News

  • Learn about biological resources

    Come to Pajarito Environmental Education Center at 7 p.m. Oct. 10 to hear about the Biological Resource Management Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Chuck Hathcock will talk about the lab’s compliance with environmental laws and the plan to protect sensitive species found on lab property.
    The biological resource management teams at LANL assess the status of a variety of organisms on LANL property, including some with threatened or endangered statuses.  
    The team then reports back about how to best manage the biological resources involved.  They have surveyed many different species, including the Jemez Mountain salamander, Rio Grande chub and numerous bird and bat species.
    LANL scientists often call upon the biology division at the lab to give advice on proposed plans that may pose a threat to the local flora and fauna.
    Hathcock is a wildlife biologist at LANL with more than 15 years of experience in the field. Hathcock and his colleagues have documented many important reports on the biology found in and around LANL.
    His research focuses primarily on songbird population demographics. Outside of work, Hathcock is an avid naturalist and hiker and can be found most weekends birding, bird banding or traveling.  

  • Show your support for youth

    Have I told you lately that I love kids? I love everyone’s kids. After today, I hope you will try to do so too.
    Our assets this week are number three, which is other adult relationships and four, which is a caring neighborhood.
    They are defined as the child receiving support from adults other than her or his parent(s) and the child experiencing caring neighbors.
    This summer, my son’s two best friends moved to other towns in New Mexico. Either departure would have been sad, but for them both to move was pretty unreal.
    I find that it was also sad for me, too.
    I didn’t see the young lady often, but knew my son was in constant communication and they hung out when they had time. They were great sounding boards for each other and a safe place for each other to fall.
    The young man was like a family member. He is one of the nicest kids I know and was often referred to as another Lauritzen. He still visits from time to time, but I miss the daily interactions, watching him at sporting events and hearing him provide my son equal amounts of sass and encouragement.
    Kids do better when they have good adult role models in their life. You don’t have to be a spectacular person, crazy smart or have money, just take time to lend an ear or a smile.

  • Be There 10-09-12

    Today
    The Los Alamos Volunteer Examiner Group will give exams for amateur radio licenses. This session will be at 6:30 p.m. in the Club Meeting Room at 4017 Arkansas (the Old Fire Barn). Those testing for a new license will need a picture ID or two other forms of ID with name and address on them (utility bill, credit card bill or other) and a test fee of $15 either in cash or a check made out to “ARRL VEC”. Participants’ Social Security number will need to be on the form 605 License Application. Those seeking a license upgrade will need the picture ID or two other forms of ID plus the original license and a copy of the license or a valid Certificate of Successful Completion of Exam and a copy of the CSCE plus the exam fee of $15. For more information, call Bill Boedeker at 662-4220 or email at boedeker@cybermesa.com.

    Tickets go on sale for the Festival of Chocolate at the Betty Ehart Senior Center. The festival will be from 7-9 p.m. Nov. 10. The fundraiser offers a plethora of chocolate offerings from the Dixie Girl, the Hill Diner, the Hilltop House Hotel, Morning Glory Bakery and more. Reserve tickets by calling 0672-4089.
    Wednesday
    GeekOut Family Night will be from 5:30-8:30 p.m. upstairs, at Mesa Public Library. Bring your own games, or play theirs.

  • Lobos rebound to top Denver in overtime

    ALBUQUERQUE — On the heels of the program’s first regular-season loss at home in nearly two years, the fifth-ranked were looking for an answer at home against Denver University (5-3-3).
    The Lobos had to wait 106 minutes Sunday afternoon before getting the game’s only goal from Devon Sandoval.
    Sandoval, a senior from Albuquerque, recorded his fourth game-winning goal of the season after capitalizing on a defensive miscue by the Denver back line.
    A Pioneer defender misplayed a long Michael Calderon ball, which bounced long off his chest to Sandoval, who buried it for his eighth goal of the season.
    “I felt it was a deserving win, and I thought we played really well,” said Lobo head coach Jeremy Fishbein. “Today was eerily similar to Friday in that we created a lot of great chances but didn’t put them in the net.”
    Sandoval’s goal in double overtime ended a contest that saw the Lobos miss out on several scoring opportunities. UNM out-shot Denver 18-11 and held an 11-4 advantage in corner kicks.
    After a slow-paced opening ten minutes of play, the Lobos began to threaten on deep attacking runs. On several occasions Lobo players elected to pass instead of shoot.

  • Toppers downed by Demons 3-1 Saturday

    The last time the Los Alamos Hilltopper volleyball team lost a District 2-4A contest, it was to Española Valley in 2008.
    The head coach of the Sundevils at the time was Garry Maskaly, who now helms Los Alamos’ program.
    But Saturday night, the Hilltoppers fell 3-1 to the Santa Fe Demons, dropping them to 1-1 in 2-4A play.
    Now, to avoid falling into a big hole in the district race, the Hilltoppers (6-6 overall) will have to find a way to trip up Española Valley Wednesday night.
    Española Valley (8-5), coming into the district season, seemed poised to be Los Alamos’ biggest challenger as it attempts to claim its fifth consecutive 2-4A title. But with Saturday’s loss against Santa Fe (6-8, 1-1) and a road date with the Capital Jaguars (5-7, 0-1) this weekend, the Hilltoppers  may not be able to afford a loss Wednesday.
    Prior to Wednesday’s match, the Hilltoppers will host Sandia Prep (4-8) tonight in a nondistrict contest. Sandia Prep got off to a slow start this season but has rebounded to win three of its last four.
    Los Alamos, meanwhile, is on a bit of a slide, having lost three of its last five outings, a slide that’s somewhat surprising after it blasted Moriarty and Bernalillo before being swept by Albuquerque Academy Thursday and the loss to Santa Fe Saturday.

  • Baseball Playoff Glance 10-09-12

    National League

    Wildcard, Oct. 5

    St. Louis 6, Atlanta 3

    Division Series

    Cincinnati 2, San Francisco, 0

    Saturday: Cincinnati 5, San Francisco 2
    Sunday: Cincinnati 9, San Francisco 0
    Today: San Francisco (Vogelson 14-9) at Cincinnati (Bailey 13-10)
    Wednesday: San Francisco (Zito 15-8) at Cincinnati (TBD), 2:07 p.m. (if necessary)

    Washington 1, St. Louis 1

    Sunday: Washington 3, St. Louis 2
    Monday: St. Louis 12, Washington 4
    Wednesday: St. Louis (Carpenter 0-2) at Washington (Jackson 10-11), 11:07 a.m.

    American League

    Wildcard, Oct. 5

    Baltimore 5, Texas 1

    Division Series

    Detroit 2, Oakland 0

    Saturday: Detroit 3, Oakland 1
    Sunday: Detroit 5, Oakland 4
    Today: Detroit (Sanchez 4-6) at Oakland (Anderson 4-2), 7:07 p.m.

    New York 1, Baltimore 1

    Sunday: New York 7, Baltimore 2
    Monday: Baltimore 3, New York 2
    Wednesday: Baltimore (Gonzales 9-4) at New York (Hughes 16-13), 5:37 p.m.

  • Duke City results from weeks 3 and 4

    Here are the results for the Los Alamos Football Club in Duke City Soccer League play for:

    In week four of Duke City Soccer League action, the U11 girls Hotshots 2002 won 2-0 over the Classic FC Dynamite, with both scores provided by Alyssa Parker.
    Kaya Krantz had a big game for the Hotshots, while goalkeepers Tanna  Hollander and Chloe Rooney earned the shutout, with Rooney forcing a missed penalty kick against the Dynamite.
    In boys week 4 games, the U13 Lasers 2000 earned a 4-1 in their contest against the Classic FC Millennials, bringing their record to 3-0 in their age bracket.
    The Lasers trailed 1-0 on a penalty kick in the first half, but rallied for four unanswered goals to win going away.
    Arthur Stienkamp and Andres Runde scored two goals apiece, while Alex Bullock had a big showing in goal. The defense of Ben Rees, Cameron Art, Devin Cantua and Cid Rice in front of Bullock was solid throughout.
    Kauru Shimada, Dean Chandler and Christopher Blue also had good showings for the Lasers in the midfield.
    The U-12 Atomic City FC were dropped 8-2 to the NM Bears. Goals came from Wyatt Watson and Dakota Duran with Jesse Prime earning an assist.
    In a non-league game, the Boys U10 LAFC tournament team won 4-1 over the U13 Northern Atkeson.

  • A calm view of Obamacare

    Some of that global warming could be the hot air expended on Obamacare this campaign season.
    What’s interesting is that when Jim Hinton, CEO of Presbyterian Healthcare Services, speaks in public, he never sounds too worried. Neither do his peers at Lovelace Health System. And yet these two organizations will shoulder the lion’s share of Affordable Care Act reforms for New Mexico.
    Presbyterian and Lovelace have both supported expansion of coverage for the uninsured. Presbyterian even backed former Gov. Bill Richardson’s effort to create state-funded universal care.  As for ACA, says Todd Sandman, a vice president at Presbyterian, “We think there’s a lot of good innovation in the law. It rewards quality. It doesn’t mean every line is how we’d write it.”
    Says Stephen Forney, Lovelace’s vice president and chief financial officer, “We always take a very long view of the system and the market in New Mexico so we’re prepared. We’ve had our eyes on health care reform for a long time.”
    That said, there’s anxiety out there about how ACA will translate at all levels. Forney wants to see “the rules written so we all know what we’re supposed to do.”

  • PACs pollute political process

    Political Action Committees (PACs) are conducting phone surveys and sending out mailers—and may do other campaign activities in the future.  These activities are independent of candidates, usually emotion-laden, and often misleading.   
    PAC activities are neither sponsored by, nor coordinated with, any candidate or candidate committee.  By law, fundraising and spending by candidates must be transparent. Candidates report all donations and spending and reveal who paid for campaign activities.  PACs act independently of candidates and collect money and spend it as they want.  
    I have had no contact with any PAC.  I first became aware that PACs were active in this race when a local voter participated in a phone survey and questioned the slanted call criticizing my opponent.  She emailed me.  I assured her that my campaign was not responsible for the calls and that I deplored the technique.   Soon after, others told me about phone surveys where similar techniques were being used against me.
    It is disturbing to both candidates and voters to be subjected to inflammatory and misleading political ads.  Unfortunately, I expect to see more such activities by PACs.

  • Jerry Sandusky Sentenced to at Least 30 Years