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Today's News

  • 'A Christmas Carol' is a haunt for the season

    “I have endeavoured in this Ghostly little book, to raise the Ghost of an Idea, which shall not put my readers out of humour with themselves, with each other, with the season, or with me. May it haunt their houses pleasantly ... ”
    So begins the preface to Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol,” and so Susan Baker-Dillingham invites the community to be “humored” and “haunted” by her new ballet, which is based on the classic tale. Baker-Dillingham’s New Mexico Dance Theater Performance Company will perform her original ballet “A Christmas Carol” Saturday and Sunday at the Duane Smith Auditorium.

  • Art Galore

    A Los Alamos tradition for 44 years, the annual Holiday Arts and Crafts Fair will be from 9 a.m.–3:30 p.m. Saturday at the Los Alamos Middle School. The Los Alamos Arts Council is hosting the event.
    To keep the tradition of a pre-Thanksgiving holiday shopping spree alive, the LAAC has lined up more than 100 artists from across New Mexico. As in past years, jewelry, pottery, painting, metal work, fabric arts and photography will be among the highlights, as well as a wide range of holiday-oriented crafts.
    New artists and longtime exhibitors will be on hand. Kathy Hjeresen,  who sells handmade jewelry and woodworker Adrian Martinez, both fair regulars, will return this year.

  • Lt. Govs are a nuisance

    Here we go again. The lieutenant governor is getting in the governor’s way. They are such a nuisance. Why do we even have them?
    That, by the way, is a good question. Some states don’t have lieutenant governors. And those states do just fine.
    New Mexico governors not only are saddled with lieutenant governors, the lieutenant governors get to be full time employees if they desire.
    And why wouldn’t they want to be on the top floor of the Merry Roundhouse in the middle of all the action?
    The problem is that they don’t have anything to do except preside over the Senate when it is in session.  
    And, oh yes, take over for the governor when he or she can’t serve or is out of state.

  • Cancer detection and man’s best friend

    Dogs are loyal, playful, loving and sometimes cute as a button. It’s no wonder we love them (some of us more than others, to be sure).
    Dogs were likely one of the very first animals we humans domesticated. They’ve been sitting around our campfires for a very long time, indeed.
    We train our dogs to sit, shake and lie down. It also could be said the dogs train us to dispense kibbles, rawhide treats, and scratches behind the ears. What matters isn’t which side comes out ahead in the exchange, I like to think, but that both sides benefit from our association.

  • State Notes 11-17-11

    Sundevils are in prime-time game of Tip-Off Classic

  • Toppers hit the ice for doubleheader

    Despite limited ice time and a new-look roster, the Los Alamos Hilltopper hockey team will need to be ready for Saturday’s season opener.
    The Hilltoppers were scheduled to open their season at home Friday, but the Los Alamos County Ice Rink is still in a state of major disrepair. Instead of hosting their home opener — that and all subsequent games until the rink is ready to go will be pushed back — they will travel for a doubleheader Saturday in the Albuquerque area.
    Los Alamos will take on the Eldorado Eagles at 10 a.m. at Outpost Ice Arena, then meet the Cibola Cougars at Blades Ice Arena at 4:30 p.m.

  • October Fire Calls

    Los Alamos firefighters share safety tips with children at Little Forest recently. During October, local firefighters responded to 119 calls including four fires, 84 emergency medical calls, eight vehicle accidents, and 23 other calls for help.

  • Researchers unravel mystery of quantum-dot blinking

    Research by Los Alamos scientists published in the journal Nature documents significant progress in understanding the phenomenon of quantum-dot blinking. Their findings should enhance the ability of biologists to track single particles, enable technologists to create novel light-emitting diodes and single-photon sources, and boost efforts of energy researchers to develop new types of highly efficient solar cells.

  • Stronger factories, lower prices lift the economy

    WASHINGTON — U.S. manufacturing is recovering from a slump, and inflation may be peaking.
    Data issued Wednesday point to an economy growing slowly but steadily. Still, surging oil prices and a possible European recession threaten to drain the economy’s momentum.
    “The continued resilience of manufacturing is encouraging, since this should be the sector most exposed to the global economic slowdown,” said Paul Ashworth, chief U.S. economist with Capital Economics.
    Industrial production rose in October at the fastest pace in three months. Output at the nation’s factories, utilities and mines rose 0.7 percent last month, the Federal Reserve said Wednesday.

  • Legislative report faults state school funding system

    SANTA FE— New Mexico needs to revamp how it distributes more than $2 billion a year in taxpayer money to public schools because the current system is too complicated, difficult to administer and shortchanges needy students, according to a report released Wednesday.
    Two legislative committees issued the report critical of the state’s school funding formula, which was established in the 1970s and is supposed to treat districts equitably. Nearly half of the state’s annual budget goes to pay for operations of New Mexico’s more than 170 school districts and charter schools.