Today's News

  • Former SF Archbishop Sanchez dead at 77

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — Former Santa Fe Archbishop Robert Fortune Sanchez, who became the nation’s first Hispanic bishop in 1974 and headed New Mexico’s largest Catholic diocese for nearly two decades before resigning over sex allegations, has died. He was 77.
    He was surrounded by his family when he died Friday in Albuquerque, said officials with the Archdiocese of Santa Fe. It did not release the cause of death but said Sanchez had been ill.
    “I ask for prayers for the repose of his soul and the comfort and consolation of his family members,” Archbishop Michael Sheehan said in a statement.

  • Leaders talk about texting dangers

    Eleven teenagers die daily across the nation in car accidents because drivers take their eyes off the road to send or receive text messages on their cell phones.

    A new study by researchers at Eastern Virginia Medical School in Norfolk found that driving while text messaging has become more hazardous and prevalent than talking on cell phones.

    The federal government now estimates that 30 percent of all crashes involve some type of driver distraction. Teen fatalities from their driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs also are on the rise.

    Concern for those escalating numbers prompted Los Alamos County police and fire chaplains Cheryl Ridlon and Jeff Eichorst to approach Police Chief Wayne Torpy with an idea.

  • Gender income disparity greatest in Los Alamos

    A comparison of paychecks indicates that it’s still a man’s world.
    On Numbers looked at the median earnings of men and women in 942 metropolitan and micropolitan areas, using data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2010 American Community Survey.
    The final score: Men outearn women in 941 markets. Women have the edge in only one place, the tiny micropolitan area of Clewiston, Fla.
    Among medium-sized markets, the income disparity among genders is the greatest in Los Alamos. Men in the community that is home to Los Alamos National Laboratory earn a median of $81,712, while women earn $41,392.
    In the Albuquerque area, median income for men is $38,372, while the median for women is $27,827.

  • LANL achieves wastewater milestone

    Millions of gallons of industrial wastewater will be recycled at Los  Alamos National Laboratory as the result of a long-term strategy to treat wastewater rather than discharging it into the environment.

    The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, which issues permits for industrial and sanitary wastewater discharges, recently approved the removal of four more outfalls from the Laboratory’s permit. (An outfall is where wastewater from Lab operations is discharged down canyons.)  Only 11 outfalls remain, down from 141 in 1993.

  • Update 01-22-12

    LAPS Board

    The LAPS Board will meet at 5:30 p.m. Jan. 26 for a work session at Chamisa Elementary.

    Golf Meeting

    A public meeting will be at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday at Fuller Lodge to discuss the progress of the Golf Course Improvements project and two new conceptual layouts will be presented. 

    Deadline looms

    Residents interested in applying for the vacancies on the Regional Development Corporation (RDC) Board of Directors are reminded that the application process will close at 5 p.m., Tuesday.

    Council meeting

    The Los Alamos County Council will meet at 7 p.m., Jan. 31 in the council chambers.

    History nuts

  • Teen Center nears Phase II application

    Two design options for a new Teen Center generated excitement at the final public meeting for the phase I Capital Improvements Project (CIP) study. The meeting drew a crowd of more than 50, with teens outnumbering adults three to one.

    Autotroph Architectural Designs (AAD), the firm in charge of the study, incorporated as much of the teens’ wish list (garnered from previous meetings) as possible.

    The core feature of both designs is a large atrium, which serves as a lounge/snack bar.

  • POGO: CMRR funding should be slashed

    The Project on Government Oversight (POGO) took a stick to the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement facility in its latest report released this week.

    The main premise of the report is that Congress and the administration should stop funding of the CMRR, which is projected to cost between $3.7 billion and $5.8 billion.

    The report came up with the following recommendations:

    • The administration and DOE should cancel CMRR-NF and zero out funding for the project in the upcoming budget.

    • If the administration and DOE fail to act, Congress should cancel funding for CMRR-NF in its next appropriations bill.

  • Central Ave. Grill’s fate still uncertain

    A number of parties are awaiting the results of a meeting that took place Thursday in Albuquerque between attorneys for Central Avenue Grill owners Min and Monica Park, attorneys for the restaurant’s landlords C1C2 Investments of Daytona Beach, Fla., and Bankruptcy Court Judge Robert Jacobvitz.

    The judge’s decision, on whether the Park’s downtown property lease remains intact, has not been released.

    Park explained in a previous interview that due to the ups and downs in the Los Alamos economy over the last few years, he occasionally fell behind on his lease payments of about $8,500 per month, which technically put the restaurant in default on its lease obligations.

  • Duvall to join LANL Site Office

    Governor Susana Martinez announced Friday that Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management Secretary Michael Duvall has accepted a position with the National Nuclear Security Administration as Assistant Manager for Safeguards and Security at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Site Office.

    Duvall, who was making $103,000 with the state, will leave his post as DHSEM cabinet secretary effective Jan. 29 to transition to his new position overseeing security and safety operations for one of the nation’s most sensitive facilities.

  • Missing White Rock girl found OK

    Members of the Los Alamos Police and Fire Departments spent the better part of Saturday , searching for a missing 16-year-old girl Saturday. 

    Miranda Romero of White Rock has been missing since Jan. 19 after having an argument with her parents, deputy police chief Kevin Purtymun said Saturday.

    At 5:55 p.m., Purtymun said Romero had been found in a canyon north of North Mesa and was being walked out of the canyon by law enforcement officials.

    Earlier, Purtymun said that Romero had contacted her parents and that her disappearance was "voluntary."

    Fliers had been posted at various places across the community, Purtymun said.