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Today's News

  • First female VP candidate Ferraro dies at 75 


    BOSTON — Geraldine Ferraro, who in 1984 became the first woman vice presidential candidate on a major party ticket, died Saturday in Boston, a family spokeswoman said.
    Ferraro died at Massachusetts General Hospital, where she was being treated for blood cancer. She died just before 10 a.m. EDT, said Amanda Fuchs Miller, a family friend who worked for Ferraro in her 1998 Senate bid and was acting as a spokeswoman for the family.
    A three-term congresswoman from the New York City borough of Queens, Ferraro catapulted to national prominence in 1984 when she was chosen by presidential nominee Walter Mondale to join his ticket against incumbents Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush.

  • Youth Mobilizers have fun at the Y

    In the late 1970s, the Village People sang loudly and proudly about how fun it is to stay at the Y.M.C.A. Today, teens don’t have the option of “staying” at the Y, but there are plenty of activities to keep them busy at the Y. In addition, some have decided to take it one step further by working at the Y.
    Those who have lived in the small community that is Los Alamos for a while, have probably heard the term, “youth mobilizer.” But those who aren’t familiar with the group have most likely been confused about what it means.

  • Alex Romero: One-wheel wonder

    Learning to ride a bike is hard enough, but try riding one with no handlebars and one wheel missing. Alex Romero, a 17-year-old Los Alamos High School junior, enjoys the challenge of unicycling. In fact, he can often be found around town on his unicycle.
    His interest in unicycling began in 2007 when he received his first unicycle from his uncle for Christmas.  
    He and his brother, LAHS sophomore Daniel Romero, attempted the sport but quit after a few days of frustration. Later in 2009, Romero and his brother gave unicycling another shot.

  • 03-27-11 Poetry Corner

    Oh Thy Ocean

    My bare feet hurt on the asphalt but I didn’t pay attention to the burning sensation rising up my legs. It was all clear to me now. I sprinted down the hill and slid down the sandy slope.  Only when I was down completely I thrust my feet into the cool water, the sand filling in between my toes, massaging my abraded and blistered feet.  
    Oh thy ocean.
    The ocean is my home.
    I calm down completely and close my eyes.
    I listen.
    I smell.
    I almost taste.
    Oh thy sea.
    I listen to the waves surfacing and skimming the shore.
    I almost taste the salty waves washing up my torrid and sweltry legs.
    Oh thy ocean.
    Oh thy sea.

  • 03-27-11 News for Retirees

    March 27-April 2, 2011
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.

    Betty Ehart

    MONDAY    
    8:30 a.m.    Tax preparation
    8:45 a.m.    Cardio plus exercise
    9:30 a.m.    Spanish lesson
    11:30 a.m.    Lunch: Orange chicken
    1 p.m.        Bridge
    1:30 p.m.    Pilates
    7 p.m.         Ballroom dancing

  • 03-27-11 Shelter Report

    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on-site adoptable pets; others are in foster care with loving, temporary homes.
    All of our fully reconditioned adoptable pets are spayed or neutered, have their shots and are micro-chipped.
    Be sure to check out links to our many pets at the Friends of the Shelter Web site: www.lafos.org. You can also volunteer or make a donation.  
    Don’t forget our two-for-one, $35 Cat-a-Palooza adoption event is still going on for a limited time. The Dog Jog is coming up April 16, so mark you calendars and register online.

    Cats

  • LALO to hold auditions

    Los Alamos Light Opera is holding auditions for its October/November 2011 production of Steven Sondheim’s, “Into the Woods.” The director is Laurie Tomlinson; Gretchen Amstutz is the musical director and will direct the orchestra. Rehearsals will begin in July.
    Auditions are 1-6 p.m. April 10, and 6:30-9 p.m. April 11 in the Duane Smith Auditorium. Potential cast members are asked to come prepared to sing a solo. It does not have to be a selection from “Into the Woods.” A pre-audition music workshop will be from 3-6 p.m. April 3 at the Unitarian Church. Everyone interested in auditioning is urged to attend.

  • Program helps parents, babies bond

    Aside from the staples such as diapers, bottles, blankets and clothes, one of the first items that parents buy for their newborn is a book of nursery rhymes. It’s a way to bond with their baby, while exposing them at a very young age, to the literary world.
    The Literacy Committee for the Rotary Club of Los Alamos is lending parents a helping hand by supplying babies born at Los Alamos Medical Center with a copy of “Mother Goose Nursery Rhymes,” as part of their “welcome” basket when they leave the hospital. Each book sports a sticker saying that it’s a gift from Rotary.

  • LAPS Foundation event slated for April 10

    Once again, the Los Alamos Public Schools Foundation’s annual Great Conversations dinner is coming to town. Join a group of tablemates and a speaker at 5:30 p.m. April 10 at the Betty Ehart Senior Center for an informative and fun conversation.
    This is the sixth in a series of articles on the featured speakers. For a complete list of speakers, topics and to print a registration form, visit www.lapsfoundation.com. Tickets are $60 per person and include appetizers, a gourmet meal, wine, dessert and coffee. Registration is open now and is complete when payment is received.

    Nelson Hoffman

    Topic:  Science’s Debt to Religion. Speaking points include:

  • Gaps in US radiation monitoring system revealed--video extra

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Parts of America's radiation alert network have been out of order during Japan's nuclear crisis, raising concerns among some lawmakers about whether the system could safeguard the country in a future disaster.

    Federal officials say the system of sensors has helped them to validate the impact of nuclear fallout from the overheated Fukushima reactor, and in turn alert local governments and the public. They say no dangerous levels of radiation have reached U.S. shores.