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Today's News

  • Snapshots of NM news

    Ours is a big state. Few others can boast population centers 492 miles apart, the distance between Farmington and Hobbs.
    Life being life, it’s easy to forget that the other corners of the state exist, much less take the time to pay attention to them.
    A few years ago, when doing Capitol Report New Mexico, I would survey community newspaper websites, taking a snapshot of local events. Recently I did the same survey. Sunday is the best day.
    In Columbus, businessman Philip Skinner wants a separate economic development group for the village.
    Southern Luna County gets too little attention from the group in Deming, Skinner says. (Deming Headlight, Sept. 16.)

  • Plea to Demo Garden thieves

    An open letter to the people picking the vegetables from the downtown Demo Garden:
    All spring and summer, several dedicated children, led by Marion Goode and sponsored by 4H, took an empty piece of the Demo Garden, on the corner of  Oppenheimer and Central Avenue, and turned it into a vibrant vegetable garden.  
    In  doing this project, they learned a lot, beautified the town, and earned their level 1 certificate from the National Junior Master Gardener Program.
    Now as their vegetables are coming ripe — someone is stealing their produce. In early September, they found so many prized and nurtured items stolen, that it was difficult for them to pick sufficient produce to enter into the New Mexico State Fair.  

  • Sports Update 09-28-11

    Trail Fest set for Oct. 8

    The fifth annual Pajarito Trail Fest will return Oct. 8.
    The Trail Fest consists of a half-marathon, 10K race and kids fun run. All the races will be held on Pajarito Mountain.
    Proceeds from the races will go to benefit the Las Conchas Fire Trail Recovery Fund.
    For more information, visit www.pajaritotrailfest.com on the Internet.

    Yum Run returns for seventh year

  • Astros, Cardinals tied with 1 to play

    HOUSTON (AP) — After St. Louis was swept by the Los Angeles Dodgers in late August, Cardinals manager Tony La Russa thought his team would fall short of the postseason once again.
    Less than a month later, the Cardinals are tied with Atlanta for the NL wild-card lead.
    Pinch-hitter Ryan Theriot delivered a tiebreaking two-run triple in the seventh inning, leading St. Louis to a 13-6 victory over the Houston Astros on Tuesday night.
    The sliding Braves lost 7-1 to Philadelphia, sending the race for the NL’s final playoff spot to the last day of the regular season. If the teams are tied after Wednesday’s game, St. Louis will host a one-game playoff on Thursday night.

  • Weiss makes his pro umpiring debut

    It didn’t take long for players of the North American League to try to ruffle the feathers of a rookie man in blue.
    Nor did it take long for the man in blue to squawk back.
    Local umpire Doug Weiss got a chance to call balls and strikes this summer for the North American League professional baseball organization. Weiss, who has worked in every baseball level from Little League to the pros, did 24 games in Calgary, Alberta, Canada for the independent professional league.
    “It’s a lot of fun,” Weiss said of his stint calling pro ball. “Baseball at that level is very different. It’s a lot faster. The pitching’s a lot faster and a lot better. The amount you have to know and retain is a lot higher.”

  • NM illegal immigrant advocates launch new campaign

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Advocates of illegal immigration in New Mexico are set to launch a new campaign aimed at countering what they say are anti-immigrant attacks.

    The advocates are scheduled to begin their "We are all ONE New Mexico Truth Tour" on Wednesday in front of Albuquerque's downtown library.

    According to the campaign, illegal aliens will share personal stories to promote immigration reform and counter attempts to roll back state laws they feel benefit illegal aliens.

    As part of the protest, advocates plan to board buses decorated with messages about illegal aliens and their families.
     

  • Philippine capital cleans up after storm kills 20

    MANILA, Philippines (AP) — Emergency services and residents in the Philippine capital cleaned up and restored electricity Wednesday after a powerful typhoon unleashed floodwaters and fierce wind that killed at least 20 people and sent huge waves crashing over seawalls.

    Most deaths occurred in and around metropolitan Manila, which already was soaked by heavy monsoon rains ahead of Tuesday's arrival of Typhoon Nesat, which brought more downpours and wind gusts of up to 93 miles (150 kilometers) per hour.

    The typhoon blew out of the Philippines on Wednesday packing winds of 75 mph (120 kph) and was expected to make landfall on China's Hainan Island on Thursday evening or early Friday.

  • Perry immigration strategy may help woo Hispanics

    MIAMI (AP) — Rick Perry is calling his Republican rivals "heartless" and using ethnically charged language to defend moderate parts of his immigration record. That strategy may endear the Texas governor to Hispanics and their allies even as it angers others the presidential candidate must woo to win the nomination for president.

  • Senate honors sick nuclear workers

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The U.S. Senate has passed a resolution designating Oct. 30 as a national day of remembrance honoring the thousands of men and women who supported the nation's nuclear efforts during the Cold War.

    New Mexico Sens. Jeff Bingaman and Tom Udall were among those sponsoring the measure.

    Udall says we often hear about the scientists behind the Manhattan Project in New Mexico. But he noted that many others -- like maintenance workers, miners, millers and janitors -- unknowingly compromised their health to develop the country's nuclear deterrent. He says it's important that we continue to recognize their contributions.
     

  • Cantaloupe outbreak could be deadliest in a decade--video extra

    WASHINGTON (AP) — As many as 14 people have died from possible listeria illnesses traced to Colorado cantaloupes, health officials say — a death toll that would make the food outbreak the deadliest in more than a decade.

    The Centers for Disease Control said last week that 55 illnesses and eight deaths were linked to the outbreak. Since then, state and local health departments in Kansas, Nebraska, Texas and Wyoming have reported six additional deaths that may be linked to the tainted fruit.

    Nine people died in an outbreak linked to salmonella-tainted peanuts almost three years ago. Deaths linked to the cantaloupes are expected to easily surpass that number.