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Today's News

  • Power outage hits DP Road

    A water line rupture on DP Road Monday resulted in a power outage affecting 12 businesses there.  Los Alamos Department of Public Utilities’ Gas, Water and Sewer crews were called out Monday to perform an emergency repair of a water line break, which occurred due to aging pipes.
     During the excavation, a primary electric wire was accidentally contacted and damaged, resulting in partial power to approximately 12 DP Road businesses east of 234 DP Road including, the Los Alamos Monitor. 
    In order for DPU’s electric linemen to safely make repairs, power lines east of 234 DP road were de-energized. Initial reports of the damage were made at 12 noon. DPU’s electric crews de-energized the lines at 1 p.m. and restored power at 4 p.m. after all repairs were made.

  • Smith’s Fuel Station to open Wednesday

    Smith’s Food and Drug Stores is opening its 19th Smith’s Express fuel station in New Mexico at 1239 Trinity Dr. at 8 a.m. Wednesday, following a ribbon cutting hosted by Smith’s representatives and Katy Korkos, Los Alamos Chamber of Commerce Member Services coordinator.
    The station is comprised of 10 filling nozzles, courtesy air hose, a convenience-item case for snacks, and a 10-foot by 20-foot kiosk for the fuel attendant. Smith’s is planning to build a new Smith’s Marketplace store across the street that is expected to open in early 2014.
    “We are pleased to now offer our Los Alamos and White Rock customers fuel savings at our Smith’s Express,” said John Roberts, Smith’s Los Alamos store director.  “In fact, rewards points maybe redeemed to save up to $2 per gallon through the remainder of the year.”

  • Smiths awards $47K to local schools

    At a time when funding for public schools is stretched, Smith’s Food & Drug Stores will donate $47,152.48 to Los Alamos and White Rock public and private K-12 schools through its Earn & Learn Program.
    A check presentation will be Tuesday, October 9, 2012 at 5:30 pm in the speech theater at Los Alamos High School, 1300 Diamond Dr.  Smith’s Store Managers John Roberts from Los Alamos, and Boyd Moffett from White Rock will represent Smith’s.
    Local schools receiving a portion of the funds in undesignated cash contributions based upon their level of support in the program include: Los Alamos Middle School $5,066.60; Los Alamos High School $4,728.38; Mountain Elementary $4,380.14; Barranca Mesa Elementary $4,157.33; Aspen Elementary $3,665.20; Los Alamos Public Schools Foundation $3,099.73; and Los Alamos Band Boosters $2,927.88. Chamisa Elementary School in White Rock received $4,786.26.
    Since 2006, Smith’s has gifted $448,665 to Los Alamos area schools. The donation from Smith’s is unrestricted and schools may select the most appropriate use for the funds. Eligible schools must be a qualified 501(c)(3) nonprofit, state-accredited, K-12 school located within Smith’s operating areas in New Mexico, Utah, Arizona, Idaho, Nevada, Wyoming and Montana.

  • Update 10-09-12

    Night in Italy
    Tickets are available for “A Night in Italy” fundraiser for Assets in Action. The event takes place Oct. 20 at the Hilltop House Hotel. Tickets are $40 each and proceeds benefit youth development programs. Additional information is available by calling 661-4846 or by email at AssetsInAction.info.

    Parks and Rec

    The Parks and Recreation Board will meet at 5:30 p.m. Thursday at the Larry R. Walkup Aquatic Center. The board meets monthly. More information can be obtained by calling 662-8173.

    Elk Festival

    The Valles Caldera will hold its annual event through Oct. 14 with the headquarters at the Visitor Center. Daily festival activities will include elk viewing, elk education booths and various demonstration booths. This event is free and open 9 a.m.-5 p.m. daily.

    County Council

    The Los Alamos County Council will meet at 7 p.m. Oct. 16 for a work session at the White Rock Fire Station No. 3.

    BPU meeting

    The Board of Public Utilities will hold its regular monthly meeting at 5:30 p.m. Oct. 17 at the DPU Conference Room at 170 Central Park Square.

  • State proposes San Juan Plant option

    Gov. Susana Martinez’s administration has issued a proposed settlement with the Environmental Protection Agency for installing pollution controls at the San Juan Generating Station in northwestern New Mexico.

    In August 2011, the EPA issued the Federal Implementation Plan, which ordered PNM to install select catalytic reduction technology on all four units of the San Juan Generating Station within five years, rejecting PNM’s proposal to install a less expensive technology called selective non-catalytic reduction technology.

    Martinez filed a petition to repeal the FIP in the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals, which is still pending.

    The EPA granted a 90-stay of the FIP in July 2012, and asked the New Mexico Environment Department to lead the effort to bring all stakeholders to the table to discuss alternatives. The NMED solicited proposals from stakeholders (none were submitted) and conducted a series of public meetings for input.

    New Mexico Public Regulation Commissioners Jason Marks and Doug Howe submitted a plan that called for replacing some existing coal units at SJGS with modern natural gas fired technology, utilizing renewable energy sources in the region and installing the less costly SNCR equipment on the plant’s remaining units.

  • Clean energy advocates march on Capitol

    In response to a proposal by the New Mexico Environment Department for reducing emissions from the San Juan Generating Station, a coalition of approximately 200 clean energy advocates marched on the Capitol last week and presented a petition to Gov. Susana Martinez’s office containing approximately 3,000 signatures advocating for renewable energy.

    The coalition includes the New Mexico Chapter of Physicians for Social Responsibility, New Mexico Interfaith Power and Light, Organizers in the Land of Enchantment, Sierra Club, 350.org New Mexico, Diné Citizens Against Ruining Our Environment, McCune Solar Works LLC, Moms for the Environment and New Energy Economy.

    Shrayas Jatkar, organizing representative for the Sierra Club, said the coalition is asking for firm dates for phasing out all four SJGS coal units and replacing them with renewable energy sources and developing a viable economic development plan for the Four Corners region.

    “I see this as a positive step in recognizing that coal no longer makes sense for New Mexico,” Jatkar said about the state’s proposal.

    “However, this doesn’t go far enough. Units three and four are the largest units and emit the most pollutants, and the plan does not incorporate renewable resources.

  • NNMC honors LANL’s Marquez

    Los Alamos National Laboratory Executive Director Richard Marquez is the namesake for a new leadership and service  award at Northern New Mexico College in Española.

    “I am honored and humbled by this recognition from Northern New Mexico College,” Marquez said. “I have been fortunate with regard to my education and career with opportunities and mentors. I believe in paying it forward and I am optimistic that this award will shed light on all of the other people who donate time and resources to making Northern New Mexico a better place.”

    The creation of the Richard Marquez Leadership and Service Award was announced by Northern New Mexico College President Nancy “Rusty” Barcelo at a foundation dinner Sept. 29 in Española. In addition to recognizing Marquez, the award will be conferred to others in future years for outstanding leadership and service.

  • Officials: Operation Hilltopper a success

    With her neatly-combed hair and nice smile, she certainly didn’t seem like a stone-cold killer.

    But that was the role high school student Katelyn Leslie was destined to play Monday morning during a town-wide emergency drill called “Operation Hilltopper.”  

    With the high school as a backdrop, Leslie and other students got to play villain and victim during an event that no one ever wants to see happen for real — a school shooting.

    “I guess I was picked because I was the least likely person they’d suspect,” she said. “I just waited for them (the police) in a conference room to find me, and then I’d have a shootout with them,” she said matter-of-factly.

    After an intense morning of watching Operation Hilltopper unfold, Phil Taylor, the emergency management coordinator for the Los Alamos County Office of Emergency Management, said the drill was worth the time and effort.

  • Police Beat 10-09-12

    Police Beat items are compiled from public information contained in Los Alamos Police Department Records. Charges or citations listed in Police Beat do not imply innocence or guilt. The Los Alamos Police Department uses the term “arrest” to define anyone who has been physically arrested, served a court summons, or issued a citation.

    Sept. 27

    2:25 p.m. –– Police arrested a 17-year-old juvenile on a charge of battery in the 1300 block of Diamond Drive.

    11:55 a.m. –– A 12-year-old boy reported to police he was a victim of a larceny. The amount was less than $250. The crime occurred at Hawk Drive.

    6:10 p.m. –– Charles Luster, 27 of Los Alamos was cited for having an animal making an “unreasonable amount” of noise in the 300 block of Ridgecrest Avenue.
    5:15 p.m. –– A 44-year-old Los Alamos female reported criminal damage to property in the 100 block of Casa Grande Drive. Damage was less than $1,000.

    4:59 p.m. –– A 14-year-old boy reported a larceny to police that occurred at 1300 block of Diamond Drive. The larceny was less than $250.

    Sept. 28

    11:15 a.m. –– A 14-year-old female was arrested on a charge of aggravated battery at 1300 Diamond Drive.

  • Learn about biological resources

    Come to Pajarito Environmental Education Center at 7 p.m. Oct. 10 to hear about the Biological Resource Management Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Chuck Hathcock will talk about the lab’s compliance with environmental laws and the plan to protect sensitive species found on lab property.
    The biological resource management teams at LANL assess the status of a variety of organisms on LANL property, including some with threatened or endangered statuses.  
    The team then reports back about how to best manage the biological resources involved.  They have surveyed many different species, including the Jemez Mountain salamander, Rio Grande chub and numerous bird and bat species.
    LANL scientists often call upon the biology division at the lab to give advice on proposed plans that may pose a threat to the local flora and fauna.
    Hathcock is a wildlife biologist at LANL with more than 15 years of experience in the field. Hathcock and his colleagues have documented many important reports on the biology found in and around LANL.
    His research focuses primarily on songbird population demographics. Outside of work, Hathcock is an avid naturalist and hiker and can be found most weekends birding, bird banding or traveling.