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Today's News

  • Rabin awarded Kiwanis scholarship

    Ellen Rabin recently received a scholarship from the Kiwanis Club. Pictured from left, Leslie Sherman, Rabin and Kiwanis Club President Fran Berting. Rabin was very active in Teen Court and will attend the University of Chicago and study political science and physics.

  • Finding a furry friend just got easier

    Friends of the Shelter invites Los Alamos residents to the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter to have their colors done.  
    The new Pet Adoption Matching Program uses colors to help potential adopters find the cat or dog that best matches their home environment, lifestyle, family situation and companionship needs.  
    In doing this, shelter personnel hope to increase the rate of adoptions from the shelter and to reduce the number of failed adoptions.
    Potential adopters will have the opportunity to complete a short questionnaire before they visit the cat room or dog kennels.

  • Learn about fire recovery at PEEC

    Los Alamos Historical Society and Pajarito Environmental Education Center have joined together to present an afternoon for children and adults from 2-4 p.m. July 30 at PEEC, 3540 Orange St.
    At 2 p.m., the Historical Society will sponsor a reading of Terry Foxx’s children’s book about fire. The book will help children understand fire and how the forest recovers from it.  It was written and illustrated by Foxx after the Cerro Grande fire with Foxx’s daughter Alison Carlisi.  As a child Carlisi, accompanied her mother as she studied forest recovery after the La Mesa fire.    

  • Ponderosa children give back

    Last week, the children of Ponderosa Montessori School Inc. hosted a luncheon for some of the firefighters at Fire Station 3 in White Rock.
    All 10 firefighters on duty went to the school where the children had prepared a lunch for them. The children were excited and happy for the opportunity to give back after all the hard work all firefighters (from near and far) had done for the community.

  • Griselda shows faith in her husband

    Antonio Vivaldi’s “Griselda” is the simple tale of a woman and the struggles forced upon her by her husband as a cruel proof of honor.
    Griselda (Meredith Arwady) is the wife of the King of Thessaly, Gualtiero (Paul Groves), whose subjects are not very fond of the queen. As a result, Gualtiero forces Griselda to endure various tortures in order to prove to his people that she is worthy of her station. But there’s a twist: Griselda is completely unaware that Gualtiero’s actions are intended only to prove a point.

  • Our daily bread in 2050

    These are the good times.
    I was driving through the country last Saturday, looking at deer happily chowing down in wheat fields.
    Everyplace is a drive-through if you’re a herbivore at this time of year.
    It’s a simple historical fact that wheat farming has been central to American agriculture since the country was young.
    And today wheat grown in the U.S. supplies American consumers and millions of other people around the world with large quantities of economical nutrition.
    Even a geologist like myself knows that much about the king of grains.
    But I was recently startled to learn that the temperatures experienced by American wheat farms back in 1839 were 6.6 degrees warmer than they are today.

  • Child Health Watch: Communicating is key to infant development

    The 100 billion brain cells we are born with have a lot to get right in the first few months of life.
    Imagine each individual in a population 15 times that of the planet earth all migrating to a specific location to make proper connections and communicate with others in a way that makes sense for the population as a whole.
    About once a day a baby is born in Los Alamos and although his brain has these amazing 100 billion neurons formed and in place, the way they connect and develop is influenced by their experience with adults and their environment.
    Most babies learn language from hearing it, so talking to your newborn is the key. Even before birth, a baby hears and knows the rhythms and tones of his mother’s voice.

  • Emergency motion filed in NM emissions case

    ALBUQUERQUE — Supporters of New Mexico’s greenhouse gas emissions rules have filed an emergency motion with the state Supreme Court.
    Friday’s motion asks the justices to overturn a Court of Appeals ruling that sent the pollution reduction regulations back to regulators for reconsideration.
    New Energy Economy, the group that initially petitioned the state for the regulations, is accusing the Environmental Improvement Board and Public Service Company of New Mexico of collusion.
    The group contends the parties settled a private negotiation agreeing that the board would hear petitions filed by PNM and others to repeal the regulations.

  • Update 07-24-11

    CRC meeting
    The Charter Review Committee will meet Monday at 5:30 p.m. in the council chambers.  The CRC subcommittee will meet at 4:15 p.m. in the training room of the Community Building.

    Bulk item pickup
    Items will be picked up July 25-Aug. 5 in White Rock. Items must be curbside by 8 a.m. each day.

    LTAB meeting
    The Lodgers Tax Association Board meets from from 1–3 p.m. July 26 in the chamber conference room, 109 Central Park Square.

    Work session
    The Los Alamos County Council is holding a work session on Tuesday at 7 p.m. Fire Station No. 3 in White Rock

     

  • Wild West attitude still prevalent in NM

    ALBUQUERQUE — The arrest of Albuquerque’s chief criminal judge on charges he raped a prostitute is just the latest example of a seemingly wild West-no-rules-attitude permeating numerous levels of authority in New Mexico.
    Just this year, the mayor, police chief and a trustee of the small border town of Columbus were accused of helping smuggle hundreds of guns into the Mexico. A judge in Las Cruces was charged in a bribery scandal with alleged ties to former Gov. Bill Richardson.