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Today's News

  • IAEA: Japan underestimated tsunami risk to plants

    TOKYO (AP) — U.N. inspectors faulted Japan on Wednesday for underestimating the threat of a devastating tsunami on its crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant but praised its overall response to the crisis as exemplary.

    The preliminary report by a team from the International Atomic Energy Agency also said the tsunami hazard was underestimated at several other nuclear facilities in Japan, and called for experts worldwide to learn from the disaster to avert future accidents.

  • Stocks sink on worries about economic recovery

    NEW YORK (AP) — The job market's already slow recovery looks to be losing momentum, and so is the manufacturing industry. New doubts about the economic recovery's strength on Wednesday knocked the Dow Jones industrial average down more than 100 points.

    Private employers added just 38,000 jobs in May, down from 177,000 in April, according to payroll processor ADP. It's the weakest result since September. The report may offer a preview of Friday's more comprehensive job report from the Labor Department, which includes hiring by both private employers and the government.

  • Next-to-last space shuttle flight lands on Earth--video extra

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Space shuttle Endeavour and its six astronauts returned to Earth early Wednesday, closing out the next-to-last mission in NASA's 30-year program with a safe middle-of-the-night landing.

    Endeavour glided down onto the runway one final time under the cover of darkness, just as Atlantis, the last shuttle bound for space, arrived at the launch pad for the grand finale in five weeks.

    Commander Mark Kelly — whose wife, wounded Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, remained behind at her rehab center in Houston — brought Endeavour to a stop before hundreds of onlookers that included the four Atlantis astronauts who will take flight in July.

  • Japan wants businessmen to shed suits, save energy--video extra

    TOKYO (AP) — The Japanese government wants the country's suit-loving salarymen to be bold this summer. Ditch the stuffy jacket and tie. And for the good of a country facing a power crunch, go light and casual.

    Japan's "Super Cool Biz" campaign kicked off Wednesday with a government-sponsored fashion show featuring outfits appropriate for the office yet cool enough to endure the sweltering heat.

    This summer may be especially brutal. The loss of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, which was crippled by the March 11 tsunami, means electricity could be in short supply around the nation's capital, Tokyo, during especially hot days.

  • WH: Obama-GOP meeting productive without progress

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House says a meeting between President Barack Obama and House Republicans was worthwhile even if it didn't bridge the partisan divide that exists over how to reduce the deficit.

    Press Secretary Jay Carney said it's useful for Republicans and Democrats to sit down and talk in a non-confrontational environment. But also he said that a large meeting like the one between Obama and dozens of House Republicans Wednesday isn't the right forum for specific advances in negotiations.

  • Let's think about putting an overpass above Trinity Drive

    I’ve been reading the letters about the proposed changes to Trinity Drive; listened to people talking on the street; listened to county council meetings and agree there is a load of 11th hour people coming out; offering mostly complaints and not solutions.
    My question: Has anyone looked at instead of making Trinity smaller by adding  roundabouts that potentially cause emergency vehicles inability to get to their destinations timely, to put in overpasses that will allow even those with physical handicaps access?  I’ve seen them in several places in Albuquerque so they must work. After all the ones on Diamond Drive seem to work pretty good and we aren’t putting roundabouts there.

  • Try tolerating reality

    Talking about infrastructure planning for the future of New Mexico energy is a serious exercise in testing your ability to tolerate reality.
    There is no pie in the sky. This is about how you and I will be able to turn the lights on, 20 years from now.
    PNM is currently undergoing such an exercise, with a full complement of public participation. The participants are not a hand-picked group. Everybody who showed up got a place at the table.
    Wherever  you are in New Mexico, this affects you. You are part of the region and face similar cost issues and environmental trade-offs. You also breathe the same air.
    The trade-offs look like this:

  • Be There 05-31-11

    Wednesday
    The Sierra Club will have a public meeting at 7 p.m. in the Upstairs Meeting Rooms, Mesa Public Library.  

    Thursday
    Los Alamos Lions Club meets at 6 p.m. the first and third Thursday of each month. Those interested in the Lions Club should call Dennis Wulff at 672-9563 or email  drwulff47@aol.com.

    The Mesa Public Library Free Film Series presents, “Almost Famous,” at 6:30 p.m. in the upstairs meeting rooms of Mesa Public Library.

     The White Rock Family Friendly Film Series presents, “Tron, Legacy,” at 7 p.m. in the White Rock Town Hall.

    Saturday

  • Assets in Action: Students take a break before the next big step

    It is done. That statement is very illuminating, for you, me, the community, even Oprah Winfrey. Those three simple words, pretty much sum up a lot this week.
    My question is, where did the time go?
    Most students will look ahead to the next school year, some thinking about the fact that “next year,” they just might be attending high school for the first time.
    Our seniors graduated and everyone moved one more rung up the ladder. Some Hawks became Hilltoppers Friday afternoon, with their right of passage at Urban Park. The big event marks not only their relationship ending with Los Alamos Middle School, but the possibilities that lie ahead as the newest members of the Hilltopper family.

  • Woman receives 'Julie's Helpers' Award

    Before her death from a brain tumor in December 2009, Julie Meadows and her family got all sorts of practical help from friends and fellow church members, organized as “Julie’s Helpers.”
    A year and a half later, it’s a scholarship fund with the same name, “Julie’s Helpers,” which is carrying on the helping legacy, in Meadows’ memory. Only now, it’s a young Navajo mom who is getting the help — $2,500 worth, for college expenses — from the fund’s first award.