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Today's News

  • Los Alamos ranks at top of magazine's millionaires list

    Los Alamos, already tagged as the sixth richest county in the U.S., now has another distinction after being ranked number one in terms of “Where Millionaires Live in America.”

    The article published in the November edition of Kiplinger takes a look at a report produced by Phoenix Marketing International, a company that keeps tabs on wealthy households. The firm also ranks 942 towns and cities by the concentration of millionaires.

  • Dad caught on video beating daughter 'needs help'--video extra

    PORTLAND, Texas (AP) — Hillary Adams says that until last week, only a couple of close friends knew about the savage beating she received seven years ago from her father, a Texas judge who handles child abuse cases.

    Now the beating is on display for the world on YouTube thanks to a secret video she made, and her father, Aransas County Court-at-Law Judge William Adams, is the subject of a police investigation.

  • Fed foresees far weaker growth than it had earlier

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve sketched a bleaker outlook Wednesday for the economy, which it thinks will grow much more slowly and face higher unemployment than it had estimated in June.

    The Fed's gloomier forecast shows that the recovery from the recession has continued to fall short of expectations. Some economists said it makes the Fed more likely to act further to try to boost the economy, though probably not until early next year.

    One option would be a program similar to the Fed's $600 billion in Treasury bond purchases, which it completed in June. Some economists think the Fed could buy mortgage-backed securities instead, which could more directly support the depressed housing market by lowering loan rates.

  • Be There 11-02-11

    Today
     The Sierra Club open meeting will feature Movie Night at 6:20 p.m. in the Mesa Public Library Upstairs Meeting Rooms. The movie will be, “Gasland.” The Bush Administration’s Haliburton Act exempted hydraulic fracturing for gas production from the Safe Drinking Water Act.

    Thursday
    Los Alamos Chapter #63 will hold their annual sales of Collin Street Bakery fruitcakes, apricot pecan cakes and pineapple pecan cakes at Los Alamos National Bank on Nov. 3, 18, Dec. 2, 9 and 16. For information, call Betty Robertson at 662-5185.

    The Mesa Public Library Free Film Series presents “Pieces of April” at 6:30 p.m.

    Friday

  • Get a jump start on holiday shopping

    There aren’t a large number of  craft fairs that can boast a 23-year track record, but the ladies of Beta Sigma Phi can.
    At 9 a.m. Saturday, vendors will showcase their work at Crossroads Bible Church, 97 East Road.
    Items available at the craft fair will include jewelry, clothes for pets, quilts, jerky, handmade wooden items and more. For some, the highlight of the event is the homemade goodies that shoppers can buy at the bake sale table. Confections of oatmeal, cranberry or chocolate chips will be available.
    Coffee, tea or apple cider can be purchased and holiday music will entertain shoppers.
    Beta Sigma Phi is a sorority based on friendship and culture that has deep roots in the heart of the Los Alamos community.

  • Leadership and culture combined

    If we were playing Jeopardy and the category was cultural history, the answer would be “the ancestral pueblo, the homesteaders, the Boys Ranch School, the Manhattan Project and now home to one of the largest multidisciplinary, multi-program research institutions in the world.” The question, of course, would be “What is Los Alamos?”  
    The ninth class of Leadership Los Alamos (aka “The Best Class”) focused on “Being Culturally Inclusive in Leadership” in their second training session Oct. 14 at Fuller Lodge.
    Barbara Judy, chief of resources at Bandelier National Monument and an alumnus of Leadership Los Alamos class, took the group on an accelerated journey through time.

  • Sitting on our historical assets

    In Texas for work and play, we see the scorched mesquite remaining from their wildfires.
    Hundreds of miles of dead trees guarantee more fires to come. But the icy fingers of the recession haven’t chilled Texas as they have New Mexico.
    As usual, I can’t resist studying how Texas does things – in this case, tourism.
    I’m here to see Fort Griffin, or what’s left of it, perched above the Clear Fork of the Brazos.
    The grounds are spacious and even include a small herd of Texas longhorns.
    “They’re just big puppy dogs,” says the visitor center staffer, who assures us we can just walk around them.
    Every fort has a story to tell, but they’re not just a history lesson.

  • Seen at the Scene: Valles Caldera

    With fall in high gear, moderate to high intensity burns from the Las Conchas wildfire blackened forests on the East side of the Valles Caldera National Preserve can be seen. The west side is virtually untouched.

  • Antibody project could unlock mysteries

    A National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant to Los Alamos National Laboratory Bioscience Division could help unravel the gnarly secrets of how many human genes function.
    Originally discovered in the Human Genome Project, the approximately 20,000 genes of the human body have been slow to reveal their exact roles. And one of the best tools for exposing a gene’s function is to take the protein it produces and generate specific antibodies, usually by vaccinating mice or rabbits. Antibodies are specialized proteins the immune system deploys to block the actions of potentially harmful bacteria and viruses.

  • On the Docket 11-02-11

    Oct. 19

    Michael Fowler, 33, of Española pleaded guilty in Magistrate Court to the charge of driving under the influence of intoxicating liquor or drugs. Judge Pat Casados sentenced Fowler to participate in an alcohol screening and treatment program, continue attending prevention meetings three times a week, install an interlock device on his vehicle, attend DWI school and a victim impact panel, serve 364 days of supervised probation and 24 hours of supervised community service. The judge also ordered Fowler to pay a $50 fee for possessing a controlled substance, $20 in court costs and $291 in fees.