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Today's News

  • Hawk Pride

    Los Alamos Middle School students and Principal Rex Kilburn pose with the 100 BEST trophy as it tours through Los Alamos Public Schools.

  • Think about your estate

    Settling an estate can be difficult and time consuming.
    Those who have been in the position of trying to find all the papers and information needed at the time of death and for estate settlement, know how much time and frustration can be involved.
    “After I’m Gone — Things to think about your Estate” is a program intended to provide the public with information to make the process easier.  
    Don Davidson will present the talk at 10:30 a.m. Thursday at the White Rock Town Hall. Davidson will share what he has learned going through the process of getting his affairs in order.
    Learn what can be done to help family handle personal affairs upon a family member’s death.
    At the time of a death, there are various immediate questions.  
    Is there a will and/or trust? Where are the will and trust? What kind of funeral service should there be? Where are the telephone numbers of relatives? Who else needs to be informed? More questions arise as the estate settlement proceeds. What bills need to be paid? Wasn’t there land in another state? Where are all the stock certificates? How do we divide some of the personal belongings? Who gets the china and silver candlesticks? Was there more than one life insurance policy? The list goes on and on.  

  • Be There 09-19-12

    Today
    The Santa Fe Chapter of the Native Plant Society of New Mexico presents a free talk by Dr. Randy Balice. The talk is titled, “Recent Drought-related Tree Mortality in Los Alamos.” The meeting is at 6:30 pm at Morgan Hall in the New Mexico State Land Office at 310 Old Santa Fe Trail, Santa Fe. Free parking is available in the Land Office Parking lot. For information, call Tom Antonio 690-5105 or tom@thomasantonio.org Meetings and talks are free and open to all.

    Mesa Public Library presents Game Night at Mesa from 5:30-8:30 p.m. Bring your games or play theirs. For all ages.

    This month’s Juvenile Justice Advisory Board meeting is scheduled for 6:15 p.m. in Building #1, Camino Entrada, Pajarito Cliffs Site. Committees will meet at 6 p.m. The public is welcome to attend. For more information, call 661-4097.

    Thursday
    “After I’m Gone — Things to Think About Your Estate,” will be presented at 10:30 a.m. at the White Rock Town Hall. The talk is free and open to the public. Don Davidson will present what he has learned about going through the process of getting his affairs in order. Learn what can be done to help your family handle your affairs upon your death.

  • Start and operate a charity for disaster relief

    PHOENIX — In the wake of recent weather-related disaster declarations, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) is rebroadcasting its webinar titled: “Starting and Operating Charities for Disaster Relief.” The rebroadcast is free and will be available at 11 a.m. Thursday.
    The webinar will explain the basic requirements for starting a tax-exempt disaster relief charity and the ways new and existing organizations can properly provide disaster relief under federal tax rules.
    This webinar will cover a variety of topics including:
    • Rules for recipients of disaster relief;
    • The various types of help organizations can provide;
    • Deductibility of contributions; and
    • Operational and recordkeeping requirements for both fundraising and working with volunteers.
    Charitable organizations have traditionally been involved in providing assistance to victims of disasters, like the flooding that occurred in Lincoln County, Sandoval County and on the Santa Clara Pueblo from June 22 to July 12 of this year.
    Enrolled agents and registered tax return preparers can earn one continuing education credit if they participate in the Webinar for a minimum of 50 minutes. Other tax professionals may receive credit if the webinar meets their state and organization continuing education requirements.

  • Clarification 09-19-12

    A story that appeared in Thursday’s “Diversions” featured a story on a talk to be given by Reid Priedhorsky. Some of the information in the press release was incorrect, due to a source error. The following information should have been included in the story.
    Priedhorsky was born and raised in Los Alamos and spent 13 years in Minnesota before returning in fall 2011. Actual excerpt from one of his trip invitations: “Difficulty will be standard ‘Priedhorsky Moderate.’
    You can look forward to extremely hard work, pain, terrible cold, blazing heat, bad food, intestinal disturbances, odor, risk of injury or death and many other unpleasant circumstances. There will also be nice scenery and an opportunity to go places almost no one ever goes.”

  • Update 09-19-12

    FAN Club

    A FAN Club will be from 5:30-7 p.m. today at Aspen Ridge Lodge.

    Court closed

    The Los Alamos Municipal Court Clerk’s Office will be closed Sept. 26-28 for staff to attend training. Payments due during this period may be mailed to Los Alamos Municipal Court, 2500 Trinity Dr., Ste. C, Los Alamos, N.M. 87544 or some payments may be paid online at citepayusa.com.

    No court

    The Los Alamos Magistrate Court will not have a Judge for the week of Sept. 17-21 due to the annual Magistrate Judge’s conference. The court hours will be 8 a.m.-3 p.m. that week.

    BPU meeting

    The Board of Public Utilities will hold its regular monthly meeting at 5:30 p.m. today at the DPU Conference Room at 170 Central Park Square.

    ESB meeting

    The Environmental Sustainability Board will hold its regular monthly meeting at 5:30 p.m. Thursday at the community training room.

  • Council approves Creative District committee move

    The Creative District Plan adopted by the Los Alamos County Council in April took another incremental step forward at Tuesday’s council work session in White Rock.

    Council directed staff to begin soliciting letters of interest for membership on an implementation committee and to draft a charter, mission statement and delineation of scope/process for the committee.

    The directive falls short of the plan Creative District steering committee members urged council to adopt. Several members took the floor during public comment and lobbied for $250,000 in seed money for the project and for a Creative District curator.

    Bradbury Science Museum Director Linda Deck focused on the need for a curator to coordinate and develop programming within the district.

    “We do all those events individually, and we do them all with short staffs putting in extra hours, and are really happy to do it because of the service that we give,” Deck said. “But I can’t tell you how wonderful it would be if we actually had a curator of the Creative District to help with organizing all of the many cats that are in there playing together and doing the marketing and making those events even more successful for everyone. We can only do so much as individuals, and we do a lot.

  • Local educator wins state Teacher of the Year award

    If you ever attend teacher Justin Black’s “math” class, don’t stand in the middle of the room.

    You’re liable to get trampled.

    That’s because Black, who was recently chosen as “Physical Education Teacher of the Year” by the New Mexico Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, has a unique way of exercising the muscles and brains of Chamisa Elementary students, all at the same time.  

    It’s something you have to see to understand. For each history section of the class, Black posts images of  historical figures and places all around the walls of the gym at Chamisa Elementary, which is Black’s classroom. Black calls out the name of said figure or place, and the students are expected to run to the correct picture. It makes for an exciting class, as a lot of students get it right, and some don’t. Either way, everyone wins as the physical experience of winning or losing reinforces the right answer in their heads.

    Math is set up like a relay race. Black divides his class in two, and each “team” forms a line facing one of the inside walls of Chamisa’s gym. On the walls are large sets of cross hairs with numbers in each of the crosshair’s sections.

  • Petition for workers OK'd

    A federal advisory panel has approved a petition that would pave the way for hundreds of sick Los Alamos workers to get compensation and health care.

    U.S. Sen. Tom Udall (D-N.M.) said the Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health approved the petition Tuesday granting what is called “Special Exposure Cohort” status to all LANL workers who developed radiation-related cancers as a result of working at the lab between January 1976 and December 1995.

    SEC status eliminates the need for claimants to undergo the often arduous dose reconstruction process in which the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) determines if a cancer is work-related.  This week’s decision has the potential to benefit hundreds of LANL claimants.

    A previous petition covering workers from March 1943 to December 1975 was approved in May of 2007.

    If approved by Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius and Congress, workers who qualify will receive a lump sum payment of $150,000 and health care coverage to treat their illnesses.

    In welcoming the advisory decision Udall credited LANL Security Guard Andrew Evaskovich for submitting the petition and advocating for former and current LANL workers.

  • New Mexico trails most in work

    New Mexicans don’t work. More precisely, fewer New Mexicans participate in the labor force, on a percentage basis, than in most states.
    I don’t know why. I haven’t heard anyone ask, other than one or two labor economics nerds. The problem has to be cultural, deeply embedded in New Mexico society.
    Start the consideration with Nebraska, the state closest in population to New Mexico. Nebraska’s population was 1.83 million in 2010. Ours was 2.06 million. Culturally the two states are vastly different, which is the point of the comparison. Similarities are a larger city, Omaha, and a state capitol 60 miles away, Lincoln. Omaha beat Albuquerque in the Pacific Coast League division playoffs.
    During 2010, Nebraska averaged 71 percent of its population in the labor force. New Mexico scored 60 percent. With its smaller population, Nebraska offered employers 55,000 more people working or looking for work than did New Mexico.
    As Buffalo Springfield observed years ago, “There’s something happening here. What it is ain’t exactly clear.”
    In the jargon, then, New Mexico’s labor force participation rate was 60 percent. By July 2012, our rate was down to 57.9 percent. Nebraska was the nation’s leader at 71.7 percent, just ahead of oil-booming North Dakota at 70.7 percent.