.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • LANL cleanup database upgrade complete

    State environmental officials say they have finished their upgrade to a database that gives the public access to information on clean-up efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    New Mexico Environment Department Secretary David Martin says the new centralized, cloud-based database application called Intellus New Mexico provides the public with greater transparency and more timely access to the environmental data for tracking efforts to clean up toxic waste around the laboratory where the nuclear bomb was developed.
    Officials say validated and verified data will be consistently formatted and automatically updated to the new system every night.
    The database can be accessed at intellusnmdata.com.
    Also, existing permits that govern the storage and treatment of hazardous and mixed waste at Sandia National Laboratories would be combined under a new permit drafted by state environment officials.
    The New Mexico Environment Department will be seeking public comments on the proposal through Nov. 16.
    The proposed permit would allow for the management of hazardous and mixed waste at eight container storage units and one area where explosive wastes could be burned.

  • United Way Sets Ambitious Goal

    Each year, the United Way of Northern New Mexico just kept getting closer and closer. Last year, its Community Action Fund was able to fund 24 of its 31 grant requests. This year, the UWNNM is going all out and is going to try and fund the full 31.

    “Twenty four were funded and 31 people asked,” UWNNM Executive Director Kristy Ortega said to the large crowd of business people and potential donors packed into the lobby of the Los Alamos National Bank last Wednesday night. “This year, we’d like to fund them all; and in the future, we’d like to fund them all, too.”

    This year, she said, that’s going to take $1.6 million.

    “This is what our community is asking for and I encourage you all to help us get there,” she said to the crowd after unveiling the goal on a big blue board for everyone to see.

    To help meet the goal of funding every grant, the UWNNM’s strategy will be to encourage donors to give to the general fund instead of designating it to a specific cause.

  • LA boys, girls face Chargers in 4A contests

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper boys and girls soccer teams will have big tests against a major Class 4A rival today.
    The Hilltopper teams will take on the Albuquerque Academy Chargers. The boys game is scheduled for 6 p.m. at Sullivan Field and the girls game is at 4:30 p.m. in Albuquerque.

    Both Hilltopper teams are going into the contests with something to prove.

    Los Alamos’ boys are coming off a 0-2-1 showing at this weekend’s Academy Invitational tournament, losing to Sandia Prep in Thursday’s opening round and falling in overtime in a rematch against Farmington Friday. The Hilltoppers knotted with Cleveland 1-1 in the seventh-place contest Saturday.

    Academy’s boys went into the 2012 as one of the favorites in Class 4A, but have looked uneven at the start of this season, going 4-4 in their first eight games including losses to Valley and Albuquerque, two schools that don’t usually feature notable programs.

    This season, Academy has uncharacteristically allowed 11 goals.

    Still, the Chargers, who finished third at this weekend’s tournament, including a victory in the third-place game over Sandia Prep.

  • Humble starts are a political staple

    SANTA FE — Log cabins are regaining popularity. It now is possible to buy kits to build your own log cabin — sort of like life-size Lincoln Logs.
    What’s the attraction of log cabins? Part of it has to do with the image, some of it rubbing off from Abraham Lincoln. Log cabins carry an air of hard working self-sufficiency and part of it has to do with politicians wanting to demonstrate they came from humble beginnings.
    Beginning in the middle 1800s, it became almost essential for presidential candidates to claim birth in a log cabin. According to National Park Service information, seven presidents claimed to have been born in log cabins. Add in vice presidents and losing candidates and you have an impressive number.
    Evidently William Henry Harrison, our eighth president, was one of the first to make the log cabin claim.
    It was only a partial truth. He did retire to a log cabin of his youth but he surrounded it with 16 rooms of more modern construction.
    Harrison was the first Whig candidate to win election to the presidency. He did it with some very creative political advisers. Harrison had been a general 30 years earlier. He was on the winning side of an Indian battle fought near the Tippecanoe River.

  • Heinrich, Wilson polar opposites on U.S. energy supply

    The two people who want to be your next U.S. Senator have a grip on two ends of the energy spectrum, but the middle is still virgin territory. One would offer carrots to renewable energy, the other would incentivize oil and gas. Neither fully embraces the range of sources.
    Democrat Martin Heinrich supported federal tax breaks and loan guarantees for companies developing renewable energy during his first two terms as a representative from the 1st Congressional District, while Heather Wilson did the same for oil and gas during her 10 years in the House. Both would move the nation toward domestic sources.
    Heinrich presents himself as the environmental candidate without acknowledging that solar and wind have environmental and land-use impacts. He says federal tax breaks for highly profitable oil and gas companies that already know how to produce their products have been unproductive.
    And yet production technology has changed a great deal and keeps changing – we have this research going on in the state. Isn’t that deserving of incentives?
    He also said that “coal and tar sands are the fuels of the past.” Not necessarily. Today’s coal is far cleaner than it was 10 years ago.

  • State improves access to Los Alamos data

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — State environmental officials say they have finished their upgrade to a database that gives the public access to information on clean-up efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    New Mexico Environment Department Secretary David Martin says the new centralized, cloud-based database application called Intellus New Mexico provides the public with greater transparency and more timely access to the environmental data for tracking efforts to clean up toxic waste around the laboratory where the nuclear bomb was developed.

    Officials say validated and verified data will be consistently formatted and automatically updated to the new system every night.

    The database can be accessed here.

  • Today in History for September 18th
  • Smart grid powered up

    Officials from New Mexico and Japan, including Gov. Susana Martinez, gathered en masse to dedicate the new Smart House Monday afternoon, which is the last link in the $53 million Smart Grid demonstration project.

    “The Smart Grid and Smart House are pioneering results stemming from the strong collaboration between Los Alamos County, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and NEDO (New Energy and Industrial Technology and Development Corporation), efforts that will demonstrate how to meet a community’s residential power needs,” Gov. Martinez said.

    “This is the first U.S. international project of its kind. And as we stand here today, with project construction complete, I know that New Mexicans across the state are proud to have reached such a significant milestone,” she told the crowd.

    Norio Sasaki, president and CEO of Toshiba Corporation, called the technology for this demonstration project the most advanced in the world. The project combines several key elements to test and improve Smart Grid technology.

  • Raw Video: Bird Steals Camera, Flies Over Water

    A seagull captured the sunset in San Francisco after snatching a tourist's camera. The seagull flew over the water with the camera and was filming all the while, but eventually dropped the camera on a walkway.

  • Man jailed on $100K bond in Gov. Martinez threats case

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — A Valencia County man facing five misdemeanor charges for allegedly harassing Gov. Susana Martinez remains behind bars in the Santa Fe County jail in lieu of a $100,000 bond despite facing only misdemeanor charges.

    The attorney for 61-year-old James Sanchez acknowledges his client left multiple messages with the Governor's Office of Constituent Services in Santa Fe using profanity and insulting language and accusing the governor of ignoring his complaints. Attorney Thomas Esquibel said his client has been on a "crusade" to protect his family from cows crossing a residential subdivision road.

    The state claims that he has threatened Martinez's life and the lives of some of her staff in the process.

    In several audio recordings of Sanchez's messages released to reporters on Friday by Esquibel, Sanchez can be heard cursing in English and Spanish, claiming that Martinez had "breached" her obligations to take care of Sanchez's children.