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Today's News

  • UCI strips Armstrong of his 7 Tour titles--Video Extra

    GENEVA (AP) — Cycling's governing body agreed Monday to strip Lance Armstrong of his seven Tour de France titles and ban him for life, following a report from the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency that accused him of leading a massive doping program on his teams.

    UCI President Pat McQuaid announced that the federation accepted the USADA's report on Armstrong and would not appeal to the Court of Arbitration for Sport.

    The decision clears the way for Tour de France organizers to officially remove Armstrong's name from the record books, erasing his consecutive victories from 1999-2005.

    Tour director Christian Prudhomme has said the race would go along with whatever cycling's governing body decides and will have no official winners for those years.

    USADA said Armstrong should be banned and stripped of his Tour titles for "the most sophisticated, professionalized and successful doping program that sport has ever seen" within his U.S. Postal Service and Discovery Channel teams.

  • 10 things to know for Monday

    Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today (times in EDT):

    1. WHERE IN THE U.S. THE RACE FOR PRESIDENT WILL BE DECIDED

    AP analysis of the past three presidential races shows 106 counties in nine states may determine who wins.

    2. WHAT WILL BE CENTER STAGE AT THE LAST DEBATE

    The blame for Benghazi and the right line to take with Iran are expected to be main topics Monday night.

    3. THE SPARK FOR THE KILLING OF THREE IN A WISCONSIN SALON

    Police say a domestic dispute may have led Radcliffe Franklin Haughton to open fire before taking his own life.

    4. WHY LEBANON LAUNCHED A MAJOR SECURITY OPERATION

  • Today in History for October 22nd
  • The AP top 25 college football poll 10-21-12

    The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Oct. 20, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and previous ranking:

  • VIDEO: The Los Alamos Monitor County Council Candidates Forum

    This is the County Council Candidates Forum sponsored by the Los Alamos Monitor and the Los Alamos Chamber of Commerce. The theme was business and economic development.

    Depending on your browser, you may need to scroll down on the page to access videos.

  • George McGovern dies; lost 1972 presidential bid

    SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — George S. McGovern, a proud liberal who argued fervently against the Vietnam War as a senator from South Dakota and suffered one of the most crushing defeats in presidential election history against Richard Nixon in 1972, died before dawn Sunday. He was 90.

    A spokesman for McGovern's family, Steve Hildebrand, told The Associated Press by telephone that McGovern died peacefully at 5:15 a.m. Sunday at a hospice in Sioux Falls, surrounded by family and lifelong friends. The family had said in a statement late last that McGovern had become unresponsive while under hospice care.

    "We are blessed to know that our father lived a long, successful and productive life advocating for the hungry, being a progressive voice for millions and fighting for peace. He continued giving speeches, writing and advising all the way up to and past his 90th birthday, which he celebrated this summer," a family statement released by Hildebrand said.

    Hildbrand's statement said funeral services would be held in Sioux Falls and that the details would be announced shortly. He did not elaborate.

  • Homeless S.C. Man Wins $200,000 Lottery

    Born and raised in Greenville, South Carolina, a homeless man now has a chance for a new home after winning $200,000 in a state lottery.

  • Today in History for October 21st
  • PRObE computer center opens

    According to high school student and PRObE Center volunteer Samuel Wang, this is kind of what a “supercomputer” is.

    “Imagine a supercomputer as a bunch of personal computers hooked up with several miles of cable to a massive server that’s fueled by a large power source,” he said.

    In other words, good luck in beating it at chess. Just like how the average computer used to take up several large rooms in the 1950s, those rooms are now reserved for the supercomputers, devices with so much memory and processing power behind them they are reserved for only the really big tasks, such as figuring out how to stop global warming, predicting the outcome of a world war and whatever else programmers may ask them to do.

    However, these machines do have a couple of weaknesses.

    Because of the way supercomputers are engineered, (miles of cable, made up of a lot of smaller computers, special cooling systems, etc.) they are sometimes very temperamental and can’t easily be made to switch tasks quickly like your personal computer can. Plus, once they are incorporated into a certain environment, these computers are usually relegated to doing whatever job it’s originally tasked with for rest of its working life.

  • Trail memorializes Satch Cowan

    When Helen (Satch) Dunham Cowan passed away in August of 2011, her husband George Cowan, thought the most suitable memorial would be a local hiking trail created and named in her honor.

    Monday, the newly created Satch Cowan Trail opens with a ribbon cutting ceremony.  Cowan was an avid hiker with a love of the outdoors.

    Friends such as Barbara Lemmick and Geffrey Howell raised $7,000 for the Satch Cowan Trail Fund, drew up a proposal and ushered it through numerous committees and board meetings to win council approval in a unanimous vote back in June.

    “There was great enthusiasm for this project from start to finish, first from the community and friends, and then all the committees that had to approve this and move it along to the final unanimous vote at county council; all were just tremendously supportive,” Lemmick said. “So even though it was a very long process, it was also a tremendously rewarding process.”

    Lemmick credits Los Alamos County Open Space Specialist Craig Martin for being instrumental in the creation of the trail.