.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • AP Exclusive: Nuke Materials Black Market

    A spate of previously unreported nuclear material smuggling busts in Georgia in Eastern Europe has international authorities investigating whether there has been a breach of a significant nuclear facility in the region.

  • Today in history for December 10th
  • 10 things to know for Monday

    Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and stories that will be talked about Monday:

    1. WHO'S TALKING AS U.S. FINANCIAL DEADLINE NEARS

    Obama and Boehner meet at the White House to discuss averting the impending "fiscal cliff."

    2. WHAT'S ON THE RISE FOR PRIVATE COLLEGE PRESIDENTS

    Compensation drifts upward, while the number of those crossing the $1-million barrier holds steady.

    3. WHY GAY MARRIAGE ADVOCATES SEE CAUSE FOR CONCERN

    Supporters question whether the U.S. Supreme Court would ever rule against the 41 states that don't allow same-sex unions.

    4. DRAFT CHARTER POLARIZES EGYPT

    A proposed constitution divides the country, with Morsi and his Islamist backers in one camp; secularists and leftists in the other.

  • 'Grieving' Cowboys Beat Bengals 20-19

    One day after Dallas Cowboys linebacker Jerry Brown died in a one-car crash in which teammate Josh Brent was jailed for intoxication manslaughter, the Cowboys played through their grief to beat Cincinnati, 20-19.

  • Snow, driving conditions prompt some delays--Video Extra

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Heavy snows and icy roads have left parts of New Mexico with forced delays, dangerous driving conditions and at least one person dead.

    New Mexico State Police say at least one person was killed Sunday in a weather related car crash near Waldo, forcing the temporarily closure of Interstate 25 just south of Santa Fe.

    The winter storm on Sunday, which struck northern and central areas of the state, also forced the temporary closure of Interstate 40 in Clines Corners where two semi-trucks were jack knifed.

    Both highways were reopened as of early Monday, but state transportation officials urged motorists to use extreme caution and expect heavy delays.

  • Today in History for December 9th
  • Winter Weather Advisory until 11 p.m. Sunday

    The National Weather Service in Albuquerque has issued the following statement:

    A WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY FOR SNOW REMAINS IN EFFECT UNTIL 11 PM MST THIS EVENING.

    * SNOW ACCUMULATIONS... ADDITIONAL ACCUMULATIONS OF 1 TO 3 INCHES EXPECTED ACROSS THE NORTH CENTRAL MOUNTAINS... UPPER RIO GRANDE VALLEY... AND SANTA FE METRO AREA WITH LIGHTER AMOUNTS ACROSS THE NORTHWEST MOUNTAINS AND NORTHEAST PLAINS.

    * TIMING... SNOWFALL WILL DECREASE IN INTENSITY THIS EVENING WITH ACCUMULATIONS ENDING BY LATE EVENING.

    * WINDS... NORTH AND NORTHWEST AT 10 TO 15 MPH WITH OCCASIONALLY HIGHER GUSTS.

    * SNOW LEVELS... TEMPERATURES WILL BE COLD ENOUGH FOR SNOW AT ALL LOCATIONS.

    * LOCAL IMPACTS... EXPECT SNOW PACKED AND ICY ROADS... ESPECIALLY THROUGH THE MOUNTAINS. VISIBILITY WILL DROP BELOW 1 MILE AT TIMES DURING PERIODS OF HEAVIER SNOW.

    PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

    A WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY FOR SNOW MEANS THAT PERIODS OF SNOW WILL PRIMARILY CAUSE TRAVEL DIFFICULTIES. BE PREPARED FOR SNOW COVERED ROADS AND LIMITED VISIBILITIES.

    More Information

    ... A WAVE OF SNOW WILL CONTINUE TO TRACK SOUTHEASTWARD THROUGH THE AREA THIS EVENING...

  • Sheriff drops charges

    A careless driving charge against Dennis J. Bernal, the driver of the pickup truck involved in the near head-on N.M. 4 crash that killed a Los Alamos High School student and seriously injured a middle school student, has been dismissed without prejudice, according to documents obtained from Santa Fe Magistrate Court Friday.

    A dismissal without prejudice does not bar the state from bringing new charges related to the accident if new evidence is uncovered.

    Santa Fe County Sheriff’s Department Lt. Joseph McLaughlin, who is handling the investigation, did not return a call seeking comment.

    A statement of probable cause and an eyewitness account of the crash do reveal more details about what happened that Nov. 21 afternoon.

    Bernal, driving a 2001 Toyota Tundra, was attempting to negotiate a right curve at the location, he alleges that he suffered a coughing spell and became dizzy. The report said as a result, Bernal lost control of his truck, allowing it to cross left of the double center divide line on N.M. 4 near mile marker 67.

    The left front bumper of Bernal’s vehicle struck the left side of the 2009 Toyota driven by Jennifer Ventura-Trujillo, who had her son Nikolas Ventura-Arencon, 14, sitting in the left rear passenger seat and Divine Fellers, 13, sitting in the center rear passenger seat.

  • Students support injured classmate

    A special fund has been set up for Divine Fellers, the girl who was riding in the same car involved in the accident that took the life of Nikolas Ventura-Arencon the day before Thanksgiving.

    According to her father Elgin, though his 13-year-old daughter came home from the hospital earlier this week, she still has quite a way to go in her recovery.

    “She’s doing well, considering she’s had her pelvis broken in four or five places and her spleen removed,” Fellers said.

    Both parents, Elgin and Nicole, said the outpouring of support they’ve received since the accident has been touching.

    “We’ve definitely had our ups and downs, but the community has been very supportive,” Nicole said. “Everyone’s been so sweet and helpful; bringing us meals and giving us hugs everywhere we go.”

    Even in their time of mourning and need, Nicole said the Ventura family, especially Jennifer, has been by often to talk with Nicole and the family.

    “And of course, our love and condolences go out to them as well,” Nicole said of the Ventura family.
    Some younger members of the community have also been looking for ways to help the Fellers family defray medical costs.

  • Research shows nuke weapon pits age gracefully

    New research uncovered by scientists at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory reveals that plutonium can age gracefully.

    A story by Arnie Heller in Science and Technology Review gives a synopsis of the history of the research.
    In 1997, the National Nuclear Security Administration launched a comprehensive study at Lawrence Livermore and Los Alamos National Laboratories to examine in detail how plutonium pits age and provide a firmer scientific basis for estimating the service life of these critical weapons components.

    The study’s results, announced in late 2006, showed that the slow degradation of plutonium in U.S. nuclear weapons would not affect warhead reliability for decades.

    Independent research teams at the two laboratories performed extensive mechanical testing and laboratory-based experiments on aged samples of a plutonium-239 allo y—plutonium mixed with a small amount of gallium to stabilize the material in its delta phase at room temperature.