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Today's News

  • Cadets receive promotions, awards

    Cadets from the Los Alamos Civil Air Patrol recently were awarded for their accomplishments during two separate award ceremonies at the Los Alamos Airport, where the LACAP’s headquarters is located.

    Cadet Senior Master Sgt. Chase Britton, 19, was awarded a silk scarf from 2nd Lt. Jane Lingenfelter and Col. Mark Smith. Lingenfelter made the scarf and the LACAP’s tradition is to present the scarf to cadets that make their first powered solo flight.

    Also receiving awards were Justin Dunn, who received his wings for his first glider solo flight and Colin Hehlen, who was promoted to cadet airman first class.

    According to Britton, he achieved that goal July 12 in Chandler, Okla. at the National Flight academy.

    Britton joined the Los Alamos Civil Air Patrol in 2005 when he was primarily interested in just building model planes.

    “But I became hooked when I went on my first flight,” he said.

    From there, it didn’t take him long to find the motivation to rise through the ranks and achieve the goals he set for himself within the organization.

    “When you’re up there in the air, everything seems so small and you get to a lot of locations very fast,” Britton said of flying. “It’s an amazing experience.”

  • LA Community Garden grows more funding

    During a small “barn-raising” at the Los Alamos Cooperative Market Tuesday, State Farm representatives presented Los Alamos Juvenile Justice Advisory Board members with a check for $96,250 from the State Farm Youth Advisory Board.

    The money will support the Los Alamos Youth Food Project’s educational and outreach community garden at the Los Alamos Middle School.

    “This grant was a competitive process across the nation and this is one of 68 community organizations to receive a service-learning, youth-led grant across the United States and Canada. It speaks well of our youth leadership,” said State Farm Agent Lou Santoro at the award ceremony. “I want to thank all of the young people that participate and make this work possible. You are making lasting change and we applaud you for that. Thank you.”

    The ceremony included the construction and decoration of a small hoop house at the co-op, which is a partnering satellite location for community garden project. The hoop house will be used for winter planting and spring seedling starters.

    The JJAB has contracted with The Family YMCA to deliver the grant’s education and food-assistance objectives throughout the next year.

  • Uncertainty goes on at Los Alamos lab

    Los Alamos National Laboratory director Charlie McMillan kept coming back to one word when describing the year that was to a group of community leaders at Buffalo Thunder Resort and Casino Tuesday.

    Uncertainty.

    McMillan said the lab finished 2012 with $383 million less in funding than 2011. The 2011 reductions include $183 million for operations and maintenance and $200 million for construction.

    In addition, McMillan said the lab finished 2012 with 1,295 fewer employees than in the previous year.

    “We are now at our lowest numbers since 2001,” McMillan said in reference to headcount at the lab.

    Of the 1,295 employees that left the lab, 557 departed under the voluntary separation program in the spring. McMillan said other the other numbers could be attributed to contactor cuts, normal attrition and slightly fewer students.

    In total, there are 10,400 employees at the lab with 7,000 of them classified as regular LANS employees.

    McMillan said procurements are down by close to $200 million from FY 11. In September of last year, the lab racked up $894 million in procurements compared to $696 million this year.

    “2012 was very challenging for us financially,” McMillan said.

    But he said the efforts to control costs have been successful.

  • In the voting booth with PRC

    New Mexico is trying to fix utility and insurance regulation yet again. New Mexico’s  Public Regulation Commission (PRC), created in 1996 to replace the previous, dysfunctional State Corporations Commission and the appointed Public Utilities Commission, has suffered its own dysfunction. So now we are voting on three proposed constitutional amendments (Amendments 2, 3 and 4), intended to fix the PRC.
    To be informed on these proposals, you must do more than simply read the ballot.
    The ballot contains only a sentence briefly describing each amendment, taken from the title of the legislation. That leaves a lot to your imagination. If you want to know what you are voting on, here’s some homework.  
    The Legislative Council Service (www.nmlegis.gov/lcs) has prepared a detailed online publication describing the PRC, explaining the amendments, offering arguments for and against, and copying the full text of all the amendments (if you can’t find the publication, use your search engine).
    I recommend it. The League of Women Voters has briefer arguments in its voter guide.  
    Amendment 2  proposes to require qualifications for future PRC commissioners. The presumption is that commissioners who regulate something as complex as utilities ought to have prior knowledge or experience.   

  • Official Health Fair Guide inside today's paper

    The Official Guide to this Saturday's Los Alamos Health Fair will be delivered inside Wednesday's Los Alamos Monitor.

    The guide is packed with 28 pages of information about the Health Fair and the providers associated with the event.

    Today's newspaper will be delivered to virtually every household in the county via Total Market Circulation. A regular program of the Los Alamos Monitor, TMC delivery is designed to blanket the market and deliver to homes regardless of subscriber status.

    The effort brings additional news, information, special sections and other supplements to members of the community who might not otherwise have access as non-subscribers. The TMC delivery also gives non-sbuscribers the opportunity to get acquainted with the award-winning journalism being produced by the newspaper.

    Those who subscribe to the Los Alamos Monitor also gain full access to all the news and information in print as well as online. For more information on becoming a subscriber, click here

  • 'Topper boys erase early deficit, top Jaguars

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper boys soccer team scored two quick goals early in the first half after falling behind in just six minutes to top the Capital Jaguars Tuesday night.

    Henry Steinkamp had a goal and an assist in the 11th and 12th minutes as the Hilltoppers downed the Jaguars 2-1 at Jaguar Field.

    The victory clinched the District 2-4A title that Los Alamos lost in 2011 to Capital on that same field.

    Check today's Los Alamos Monitor for more information.

  • 10 things to know for Wednesday


    Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and stories that will be talked about on Wednesday:

    1. CANDIDATES DEMONSTRATING URGENCY OF CAMPAIGN'S FINAL STRETCH

    In the busiest single day of his re-election campaign, the president will cover 5,300 miles, as Romney casts the race as moving his way.

    2. HIGH STAKES FOR MICROSOFT AS IT UNVEILS WINDOWS 8

    The dramatic overhaul of the operating system may prove that the largest software maker can still compete or reinforce perceptions that it is falling behind.

    3. JORDANIAN MONARCH SEEKS TO STEER NATION THROUGH TURBULENCE

    King Abdullah has managed to fend off domestic challenges for 22 months, but growing opposition and a foiled al-Qaida plot mean things are heating up.

    4. IT'S OPENING DAY FOR NATION'S FASTEST ROAD

  • Today in History for October 24th
  • Paraplegic survives 3 days stranded in NM desert


    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A paraplegic man who says he was stranded in the New Mexico desert without his wheelchair dragged himself down a dirt road for three days, crawling about four miles before a motorist finally stopped to help him.

    Tattered and dirty, Ricky Gilmore's blue jeans tell part of the story. His body tells the rest — the skin on his left leg and buttocks is shredded, his wrist is sprained and his kidneys are in bad shape from going without food and water.

    "Ah man, I'm just a big mess. I ache and I'm just in the first stages of healing," he told The Associated Press on Tuesday from his hospital bed at the Northern Navajo Medical Center in Shiprock, N.M.

    Gilmore is being treated for acute kidney failure from dehydration, a sprained wrist and a blood infection. He spent two days in intensive care and it could be at least another week before he can go home.

  • Sculptor: 1,800 Pound Pumpkin Used in Display