.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Jurors rule 3 doctors owe NM patient $9 million

    LAS VEGAS, N.M. (AP) — A San Miguel County jury has awarded a Raton woman $9 million against three doctors after she suffered heart damage when her heart attack was not diagnosed for more than a day.

    Bryanna Baker's attorney, Randi McGinn, said that despite the verdict, the law has a $600,000 cap on what Baker can collect from each doctor, meaning she could collect $1.8 million. McGinn said she plans to challenge the cap's constitutionality.

  • Poll: Students grade high school down, college up

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Young people give mediocre marks to America's high schools but put great faith in its colleges.

    A new Associated Press-Viacom poll suggests most high schools are failing to give students a solid footing for the working world or strong guidance toward college, at a time when many students fear graduation means tumbling into an economic black hole.

    Most of the 18- to 24-year-olds surveyed gave high schools low grades for things that would ease the way to college: A majority say their school wasn't good at helping them choose a field of study, aiding them in finding the right college or vocational school or assisting them in coming up with ways to pay for more schooling.

  • Japan nuke plants starts pumping radioactive water

    TOKYO (AP) — The operator of Japan's crippled nuclear plant began pumping highly radioactive water from the basement of one of its buildings to a makeshift storage area Tuesday in a crucial step toward easing the nuclear crisis.

    Removing the 25,000 metric tons (about 6.6 million gallons) of contaminated water that has collected in the basement of a turbine building at Unit 2 of the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant will help allow access for workers trying to restore vital cooling systems that were knocked out in the March 11 tsunami.

  • Running: So much for that tough Boston Marathon course--video extra

    BOSTON (AP) — The rest of the world can debate whether Geoffrey Mutai set a record when he blistered the Boston Marathon course in 2 hours, 3 minutes, 2 seconds — the fastest anyone has ever run 26.2 miles.

    From Hopkinton to Copley Square, there is no doubt.

    "We had a stunning performance and an immensely fast time here today," Tom Grilk, the head of the Boston Athletic Association, said on Monday. "We in Boston are well-pleased with what has happened, and that's good unto itself. The definitions of others, I will leave to them."

    Mutai outsprinted Moses Mosop down Boylston Street to win by 4 seconds, and the two Kenyans each beat Haile Gebrselassie's sanctioned world record of 2:03:59.

  • GOP insiders embrace Trump's presidential bid

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Out with Sarah. In with The Donald.

    President Barack Obama has launched his re-election bid in a low-key manner, but the Republican Party's search for a challenger seems stranger by the day.

    GOP celebrities like Sarah Palin aren't getting much buzz. Mainstream candidates like Mitt Romney and Tim Pawlenty aren't getting much traction. It's people once considered highly unlikely to compete seriously for the party's nomination who are creating big stirs in early voting states, a reflection of an unformed and uncertain GOP presidential field.

  • Study points to vulnerabilities of plutonium facility in seismic event

    Los Alamos National Laboratory officials are looking at ways to strengthen the structure of its plutonium processing building in response to a study that shows it would be vulnerable to significant damage in the event of a major earthquake.

    LANL adopted an updated site-wide seismic hazard analysis standard in 2007. In response to that effort, LANL’s Seismic Analysis of Facilities and Evaluation of Risk (SAFER) Project has been conducting a detailed multiyear analysis of the seismic design loads on every existing facility at the site. New or proposed facilities are designed to meet the latest seismic response criteria.

  • Residential fire tapped out on Questa near LAHS

    A fire at a two-story home on Questa, not far from Los Alamos High School, was tapped out by Los Alamos firefighters Monday afternoon.

    The structure remains intact, but there has been extensive smoke damage to the residence.

    Fire Marshal Michael Thompson credits an observant neighbor who noticed smoke coming out from what he initially thought to be the door area of the home.

    "He tried to put out the fire but then noticed more fire coming from the crawl space underneath the home and immediately called 911," Thompson said. "His quick action helped keep the fire from spreading."

  • 1 in 5 New Mexicans gets government help for food

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — One in five New Mexicans now receives government help to buy food.

    The number of people enrolled in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, soared as the nation's economy began sinking a couple of years ago, with more than 400,000 New Mexico residents now receiving the benefits, the Albuquerque Journal Monday reported in a copyright story.

    SNAP benefits, once known as food stamps, are a safety net for people who have fallen on tough times.

    The program is based on income. A family of four, for example, can make up to $3,032 a month and qualify.

    New Mexico figures show the average SNAP beneficiary in March received $296.

  • Radiation near Japan reactors too high for workers--video extra

    TOKYO (AP) — A pair of thin robots on treads sent to explore buildings inside Japan's crippled nuclear reactor came back Monday with disheartening news: Radiation levels are far too high for repair crews to go inside.

    Nevertheless, officials remained hopeful they can stick to their freshly minted "roadmap" for cleaning up the radiation leak and stabilizing the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant by year's end so they can begin returning tens of thousands of evacuees to their homes.

    "Even I had expected high radioactivity in those areas. I'm sure (plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Co.) and other experts have factored in those figures when they compiled the roadmap," Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano said.

  • Track and field: LA boys nip Santa Fe to win Cap. City meet

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper boys track and field team held its collective breath until the final event Saturday, but took top honors in the Capital City Invitational.
    Los Alamos held off the host Santa Fe Demons to win the meet. Ian Pulliam of the Hilltoppers’ 1600-meter relay team held off a late charge in the final event of the day as Los Alamos nipped Santa Fe 85-82.
    It was the second win in a row for Los Alamos, which was also a winner at the Los Alamos Classic a week earlier.
    For Los Alamos, Jacob Brown won and qualified for state in the triple jump. Brown posted a career-best 42 feet, 8-3/4 inches to earn the win.