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Today's News

  • Republicans starting to pile on Romney

    CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — The Republican presidential race is quickly becoming a scattershot effort to deny Mitt Romney the GOP nomination by any means necessary.

    His rivals descended this week on what is essentially his home turf and they are ready to challenge the former Massachusetts governor on the economy, his central campaign theme, in a Tuesday night debate focused on that issue.

    But don't expect the criticism from Romney's opponents to stop there, given that time is quickly running out before the first votes are cast in the GOP nominating fight.

  • Senate Republicans likely to kill Obama jobs bill

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama's jobs bill, facing a critical test in the Senate, appears likely to die at the hands of Republicans opposed to stimulus spending and a tax surcharge on millionaires.

    Obama has been waging a campaign-style effort seeking to rally public support behind the $447 billion measure, which will be the subject of a Senate vote Tuesday. The plan combines payroll tax cuts for workers and businesses with $175 billion in spending on roads, school repairs and other infrastructure, as well as unemployment assistance and help to local governments to avoid layoffs of teachers, firefighters and police officers.

  • Search to begin in NM sex torture case

    TRUTH OR CONSEQUENCES, N.M. (AP) — Federal and local law enforcement agents are scheduled to comb through Elephant Butte Reservoir in southern New Mexico to search for possible victims of a man convicted of sexually torturing women.

    Dozens of agents are slated Tuesday to search area caves for any remains of missing victims of David Parker Ray.

    The FBI says it has received new information about possible victims who may have been buried in the area.

    Authorities have long believed that the Elephant Butte man, who died in 2002 while was serving life in prison for sexual torture, buried some of his victims. Ray boasted that he was responsible for around 40 victims.

  • Cruz hits grand slam in 11th, Texas beats Tigers

    ARLINGTON, Texas (AP) — Nelson Cruz hit the first game-ending grand slam in postseason history, lifting the Texas Rangers over the Detroit Tigers 7-3 in 11 innings Monday for a 2-0 lead in the AL championship series.

    Cruz doubled early, then hit a tying home run in the seventh inning. His second homer of the game was a high drive to left field off Ryan Perry with nobody out in the 11th, and came after a misplay in the Detroit outfield loaded the bases.

    "It was amazing," Cruz said. "First two pitches, I was too aggressive. I hit the ball — foul ball, foul ball. So after that, I told myself just slow down and try to hit a fly ball to the outfield."

  • TCU accepts invitation to join Big 12

    FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — TCU accepted an invitation to join the Big 12 on Monday night, ignoring the conference's recent instability and seizing an opportunity to be a part of a league with natural geographic rivals.

    Chancellor Victor Boschini Jr. made the expected announcement in front a packed room of more than 200 people, and athletic director Chris Del Conte fought back tears as he recalled receiving the phone call from the Horned Frogs' new conference last week.

    "This is living proof that dreams do come true," he said.

  • Documents: Wis. woman hatched plan to steal baby--video extra

    MILWAUKEE (AP) — Desperate to give her boyfriend a son but unable to conceive, Annette Morales-Rodriguez faked a pregnancy for months, court documents say, then began trolling Milwaukee's streets for pregnant women in hopes of stealing an unborn baby.

    After two days of searching, the 33-year-old woman finally spotted Maritza Ramirez-Cruz, who was just a week from her due date. Morales-Rodriguez lured the young Puerto Rican immigrant into her home, according to court documents, and beat her with a baseball bat before cutting her full-term fetus from her womb with an X-Acto knife, killing both the mother and the baby.

  • Deficit 'supercommittee' struggles as clock ticks

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The supercommittee is struggling.

    After weeks of secret meetings, the 12-member deficit-cutting panel established under last summer's budget and debt deal appears no closer to a breakthrough than when talks began last month.

    While the panel members themselves aren't doing much talking, other lawmakers, aides and lobbyists closely tracking the committee are increasingly skeptical, even pessimistic, that the panel will be able to meet its assigned goal of at least $1.2 trillion in deficit savings over the next 10 years.

    The reason? A familiar deadlock over taxes and cuts to major programs like Medicare and the Medicaid health care program for the poor and disabled.

  • Two Americans share Nobel economics prize

    STOCKHOLM (AP) — Americans Thomas Sargent and Christopher Sims won the Nobel economics prize on Monday for research that sheds light on the cause-and-effect relationship between the economy and policy instruments such as interest rates and government spending.

    Sargent and Sims — both 68 — carried out their research independently in the 1970s and '80s, but it is highly relevant today as world governments and central banks seek ways to steer their economies away from another recession.

    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said the winners have developed methods for answering questions such as how economic growth and inflation are affected by a temporary increase in the interest rate or a tax cut.

  • Survey: US gas prices dip 13 cents in past 2 weeks

    CAMARILLO, Calif. (AP) — A survey says the average U.S. price of a gallon of gasoline has dropped 13 cents over the past two weeks.

    The Lundberg Survey of fuel prices released Sunday puts the price of a gallon of regular at $3.42, down 13 cents from two weeks earlier and down 25 cents in the past month.

    Costs have seen similar drops in midgrade, now at an average of $3.58 a gallon, and premium at $3.70.

    Diesel fell seven cents to $3.85 a gallon.

    Of the cities surveyed, Albuquerque, N.M., had the nation's lowest average price for gas at $3.07, and perennial price leader San Francisco had the highest at $3.81.

  • Analyze your benefits

    Admit it: You probably spend more time comparison shopping online than reviewing your annual benefits enrollment materials.
    That’s a big mistake because the money you could save by choosing the right employee benefits package probably far exceeds any savings you could get on a big-screen TV.
    For example, many people don’t sign up for an extremely valuable benefit – flexible spending accounts (FSAs).
    If your employer offers them, FSAs let you pay for eligible out-of-pocket health care and/or dependent care expenses on a pre-tax basis – that is, before federal, state and Social Security taxes are deducted from your paycheck.