Today's News

  • Groundhog: Six more weeks of winter

    PUNXSUTAWNEY, Pa. (AP) — Pennsylvania’s Punxsutawney Phil emerged from his lair to “see” his shadow on Thursday, in the process predicting six more weeks of winter.
    But, at this rate, that might not be so bad.
    The groundhog made his “prediction” on Gobbler’s Knob, a tiny hill in the town for which he’s named about 65 miles northeast of Pittsburgh.
    Temperatures were near freezing when he emerged at dawn — unseasonably warm — and were forecast to climb into the mid-40s in a winter that’s brought little snow and only a few notably cold days to much of the East.

  • Update 02-02-12

    BPU meeting

    The Board of Public Utilities will meet at 5:30 p.m., Feb. 15, at the DPU Conference Room, 170 Central Park Square.

    T-Board meeting

    The Transportation Board’s regularly scheduled meeting has been moved to 5:30 p.m. Feb. 9 in the public works conference room, 2101 Trinity Drive.

    Council meeting

    The County Council will meet at 7 p.m. Feb. 7 in Council Chambers.

    Ashley Pond
    A public meeting will be held regarding Ashley Pond will be at 6:30 p.m Feb. 9. in the Community Building Council Chambers


  • NCRTD addresses transit center

    The North Central Regional Transit District had been trying to figure out what it was going to do about construction and soil conditions at the Jim West Regional Transit Center in Espanola.
    On Thursday in a special meeting at Buffalo Thunder Casino and Resort, the Board authorized an adjustment to the project budget in the amount of $606,054.
    “This additional money will allow us to bid out the Silkey Road improvement and the bus parking area that were additive alternates to the project but not awarded,” NCRTD executive director Anthony J. Mortillaro said Thursday. “These portions of the project need to be completed as part of the site plans for its functionality and also for obtaining a certificate of completion from the city.”

  • Alums return for festivities

    The ribbon cutting ceremony drew quite a crowd at Los Alamos High School Thursday night. Making the trip was the Blackstone family from Albuquerque and they all have Los Alamos connections. From left to right: Kay Blackstone Provalt, a 1970 graduate; Betty Blackstone, who was the cheerleader sponsor from 1971 to 1980 and a history teacher until her retirement in 1986; Bob Blackstone, a retired Los Alamos National Laboratory employee;  and Ernie Blackstone, a 1975 graduate.

  • Another era begins at LAHS

    It was a long-awaited project, one which some thought would never be finished. But following a series of false fire alarms and construction delays, not to mention a few other problems along the way, the students at Los Alamos High School finally have a new building, marking the end of an era.
    The school hosted a ribbon cutting on Wednesday night to mark the official “opening” of the building, which cost $23 million, according to LAPS Chief Financial Officer John Wolfe.
    Students have been occupying the building for a few weeks. An overflow crowd of school board members, LAHS personnel and members of the community attended the event.

  • You can't ignore history

    In 1982, I learned more about fish, Lake Michigan, and Indian treaty rights than I thought possible. The Ottawa and Chippewa tribes had won a Supreme Court case that reaffirmed their rights to fish on the lake. White commercial and sport fishermen were so riled, they smashed Indian boats and roughed up Indian fishermen.  
    I was contracted for six months to build a public information campaign that would calm public sentiment enough for the tribes to fish in peace. I brought with me from New Mexico a familiarity with Indian issues and PR experience defending unpopular causes (an electric utility).

  • How is this going to help?

    Gov. Susana Martinez wants to exempt small businesses paying less than $200 a month in gross receipts tax from having to pay the tax.
    She says it will affect over 40,000 small businesses in the state, most of which are one-person businesses.
    I am one of those businesses and the chances are fairly good that you may be one too.
    And for the life of me, I can’t figure out how it is going to help anyone. Supposedly it will help me hire an employee.
    This column appears in many newspapers around the state but even if it appeared in all of them, it isn’t enough to share with anyone but my wife, who does the bookkeeping for free.

  • Be There 02-02-12

    The February meeting of the Los Alamos Master Gardeners will be at 7 p.m. in the Nambé Room of Fuller Lodge. Members should bring seed catalogs to share.

    The Daddy/Daughter

  • Youth food project underway

    It’s a new year, which means there’s a new project for community members to be involved in, creating an asset-rich environment of Healthy Community! Healthy Youth!
    The Family Y and the Juvenile Justice Advisory Board are underway to create a community greenhouse and garden to grow food that that can be donated or sold locally, all in the name of Los Alamos Youth Food Project.
    The community collaboration exudes a work ethic not often seen.
    Kristine Coblentz, coordinator for JJAB has seen the project from idea to inception with Debbie Gill and Stephanie Krantz, checking presentation and securing the grant.

  • Former Ali trainer Angelo Dundee dead at 90

    There was no way Angelo Dundee was going to miss Muhammad Ali’s 70th birthday party.
    The genial trainer got to see his old friend, and reminisce about good times. It was almost as if they were together in their prime again, and what a time that was.
    Dundee died in his apartment in Tampa, Fla., Wednesday night at the age of 90, and with him a part of boxing died, too.
    He was surrounded by his family, said his son, Jimmy, who said the visit with Ali in Louisville, Ky., meant everything to his Dad.
    “It was the way he wanted to go,” the son said. “He did everything he wanted to do.”