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Today's News

  • Japan sets new radiation safety level for seafood

    TOKYO (AP) — Fishermen who lost their homes and boats in Japan's tsunami now fear radioactive water gushing into the Pacific Ocean from a crippled nuclear plant could cost them their livelihoods.

    The contaminated water raised concerns about the safety of seafood in the country that gave the world sushi, prompting the government to set limits for the first time on the amount of radiation permitted in fish.

    Authorities insisted the radioactive water would dissipate and posed no immediate threat to sea creatures or people who might eat them. Most experts agreed.

  • Dog gets hugs from owner after tsunami rescue--see video

    TOKYO (AP) — A dog rescued from drifting ocean debris immediately jumped to her owner and wagged her tail at their reunion more than three weeks after Japan's tsunami.

    Toshio Suzuki described Monday's reunion at the animal shelter he heads in the tsunami-wrecked Miyagi region of northern Japan. The owner of the 2-year-old mixed breed named Ban saw Friday's rescue on television.

    The woman was not identified for privacy reasons. Suzuki said she has an adult daughter and that the family suffered tsunami damage but was not specific.

    Public broadcaster NHK aired images of the reunion with the woman hugging Ban and the dog warmly wagging her tail.

  • Poll reveals baby boomers' retirement fears

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Baby boomers are starting to retire, but many are agonizing about their finances and believe they'll need to work longer than they had planned, a new poll finds.

    The 77 million-strong generation born between 1946 and 1964 has clung tenaciously to its youth. Now, boomers are getting nervous about retirement. Only 11 percent say they are strongly convinced they will be able to live in comfort.

    A total of 55 percent said they were either somewhat or very certain they could retire with financial security. Yet a substantial 44 percent express little or no faith they'll have enough money when their careers end.

  • Final battle rages in Ivory Coast--video extra

    ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast (AP) — The United Nations and French forces opened fire with attack helicopters Monday on the arsenal of this country's entrenched ruler, as columns of foot soldiers finally pierced the city limit and surrounded the strongman's home.

    The fighters aiming to topple strongman Laurent Gbagbo had succeeded in taking nearly the entire countryside in just three days last week, but they faltered once they reached the country's largest city, where the presidential palace and residence are located.

  • New Mexico women's basketball head coach retires

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — University of New Mexico officials confirmed Monday that women's basketball head coach Don Flanagan is retiring.

    Flanagan is the most successful coach in the history of the New Mexico women's program. He posted a 340-168 record in 16 seasons, took the Lobos to the NCAA Tournament eight times and won a handful of conference championships.

    Flanagan had one year left on a four-year contract extension. The Albuquerque Journal reported that Flanagan made the decision after five freshman players informed him of their intentions to quit the team.

  • Child abuse hotline gets a new number

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico has a new hotline number to report child abuse and neglect.

    Gov. Susana Martinez and Children, Youth, and Families Secretary Yolanda Deines on Monday announced the new statewide number — 1-855-333-SAFE.

    The department has had a hotline for 12 years, but officials say the new number is easier to remember.

    Caseworkers at the Children, Youth and Families Department's Albuquerque-based central intake unit answer the calls and get as much information as possible.

    A supervisor then reviews each case, deciding whether it will be investigated and whether it's a priority.

    Cases are sent to the county where the child lives.

  • Man and woman found dead in northern NM

    TRUCHAS, N.M. (AP) — Rio Arriba authorities are investigating the deaths of two people found just outside the community of Truchas in northern New Mexico.

    The Albuquerque Journal reports the bodies of a 31-year-old man and a 24-year-old woman were found Sunday afternoon by a relative of the dead woman.

    Authorities are treating the deaths as a homicide.

    A spokesman for the Rio Arriba Sheriff's office tells the Journal both victims were shot to death.

    The sheriff's office says persons of interest are being sought for questioning. So far, there have been no arrests.

  • AP source: 9/11 suspects to face military tribunal

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal law enforcement official says professed 9/11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and four alleged co-conspirators are being referred to the system of military commissions for trial.

    The decision by the Obama administration is an about-face from earlier plans to have the five go on trial in civilian federal court in New York.

    The official spoke on condition of anonymity about the switch, which Attorney General Eric Holder was expected to announce at an afternoon news conference.


     

  • 5 homes, barns burn in fast-moving NM grass fire--see video

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Firefighters battled a wind-driven wildfire Monday that has already destroyed five homes, forced evacautions and knocked oput plower to about 1,000 homes and businesses, officials said.

    More than 100 people at Ruidoso Downs Racetrack and Casino were ordered evacuated Sunday as were several neighborhoods in the community of Ruidoso Downs.

    New Mexico Forestry Division spokesman Dan Ware confirmed that the buildings were damaged by the wind-driven blaze, which had not been contained. He said it has scorched more than 2,000 acres, or over 3 square miles, on private, state and federal land in southern New Mexico.

  • Search for radiation leak turns desperate in Japan--video extra

    TOKYO (AP) — Workers used a milky bathwater dye Monday as they frantically tried to trace the path of radioactive water seeping into the ocean from Japan's tsunami-damaged nuclear plant.

    The crack in a maintenance pit discovered over the weekend was the latest confirmation that radioactivity continues to spill into the environment. The leak is a symptom of the primary difficulty at the Fukushima Dai-ichi complex: Radioactive water is pooling around the plant and preventing workers from powering up cooling systems needed to stabilize dangerously vulnerable fuel rods.