Today's News

  • Dems question use of video

    SANTA FE (AP) — Legislative Democrats are questioning the use of videotaping committee hearings and floor debates.
    Senate Democrat Tim Jennings of Roswell alleges the cameras operated by Governor’s Office staffers are intended to catch them for political purposes.
    A spokesman for Gov. Susana Martinez tells the Albuquerque Journal there is no preference given to either House or Senate committees — or any committee in particular.
    Some legislators question whether that is actually the case. They noted that committee meetings that feature high-profile agenda items are generally the ones that are filmed.

  • Update 02-01-12

    Historic board

    The Fuller Lodge Historic Districts Advisory Board will meet at 5 p.m. today at Fuller Lodge.

    T-Board meeting

    The Transportation Board’s regularly scheduled meeting has been moved to 5:30 p.m. Feb. 9 in the public works conference room, 2101 Trinity Drive.

    Special session

    A special session with council and the Los Alamos Board of Education is scheduled for
    6:30 p.m. today at council chambers.

    Ashley Pond

    A public meeting will be held regarding Ashley Pond will be at 6:30 p.m Thursday, Feb. 9. in the Community Building Council Chambers


  • IBEX probe glimpses Interstellar Neighborhood

    Space scientists, including researchers from Los Alamos National Laboratory, have described the first detailed analyses of captured interstellar neutral atoms—raw material for the formation of new stars, planets and even human beings.

    The information was presented in Washington, D.C., at a press conference sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

    Researchers presented data from the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX), which directly sampled material carried from outside our solar system across the galaxy by solar and stellar winds. Full details of the research comprise a six-paper special section in the February edition of Astrophysical Journal Supplements.

  • CMRR funding in limbo

    What’s next for the future of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement Nuclear Facility in the next fiscal year is just about anybody’s guess.

    Last week, an article in the Nuclear Weapons and Materials Monitor, said Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) officials are bracing for a “massive cut” to the proposed CMRR facility.

    “We’re not expecting funding for CMRR (in FY2013),” a LANL manager told the trade publication.  “Right now, we’re planning to go without.”

    In FY 12, the project did receive $200 million in funding but the final Congressional report said that no construction activities were funded.

  • First Born Graduate

     The First Born Program of Los Alamos and Los Alamos Medical Center recently honored the first family to complete its full three-year home visiting course, Itzia Rodriguez, her mother, Crystal, and their extended family. Free to all first-time families, First Born staff offers parents researched suggestions for best parenting from prenatal to three years old, and connect families with community services as needed. The First Born Program is Los Alamos County’s only early childhood program. It is supported by Los Alamos Medical Center and the LAMC Auxillary, and funded by the LANL Foundation; N.M. Children, Youth and Families Division; and community donors. For more information, contact Patricia Worth R.N., Program Manager, 661-9230.

  • Happy birthday, councilor

    It was a team effort to light 50 candles on a cake to celebrate Councilor Geoff Rodgers birthday at council Tuesday night. “Ten years ago I was here on this dais for my 40th birthday. I make a promise to the community I will not be here for my 60th birthday,” Rodgers said.

  • Broadband moves forward

    Support for a community broadband network was evident in public comment from more than 50 people who attended Tuesday night’s council meeting.

    “No one would ever accuse me of being a high tech person, but I do understand the importance of technology in today’s world. I also understand the importance of a fast flow of information today and in the future,” resident Lori Heimdahl Gibson said. “Information is power. Information supports economic development. Information enhances our quality of life. Broadband will allow greater amounts of information to flow into and out of each of our homes and businesses and will allow us to thrive in this modern world.”

  • The thing about trophies...

    My youngest son played T-ball a couple of years ago.  He didn’t really play. He kept the dugout safe, though.  
    He made sure the dugout bench was warm by lying on it.
    He kept track of the equipment too.  When asked to go out to the field to play, he refused because it was too cold.  
    I am not even sure if he went up to bat.  He probably did, because that is the fun part.  He sat on the ground when he was at base.  
    He was a horrible T-ball player. But, regardless of his complete lack of participation he got a trophy at the end of the season. It was a cute little bobble-head thing.  He liked his trophy.

  • Sports Update 02-01-12

    Jr. Toppers returns Saturday

    The Jr. Toppers basketball skills clinics are scheduled for Saturday.
    A session for preschoolers through second grade students is set for 9 a.m. at Mountain School. Students in grades 3-8 will be at Los Alamos High School, also starting at 9 a.m.
    The clinics are free of charge and are for both boys and girls.
    For more information, go to www.laschools.net.


  • Lobos rout Air Force, improve to 4-2 in MWC

    AIR FORCE ACADEMY, Colo. (AP) — Still stinging from back-to-back losses to the Mountain West’s other heavyweights, the New Mexico Lobos are taking out their frustrations on everyone else.
    The Lobos got 13 points from both Drew Gordon and Kendall Williams Tuesday night when they handed Air Force an 81-42 drubbing, its most lopsided home loss ever.
    With their third straight double-digit win, the Lobos (18-4, 4-2) moved within a half-game of conference co-leaders No. 11 UNLV and No. 17 San Diego State, the two schools that handed them early losses in league play.
    “Those two letdowns obviously showed us what we need to work on,” Gordon said.
    And they’ve worked on those things very well, indeed.