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Today's News

  • AIR QUALITY IMPACTS MAINLY TO SOUTHWEST NM MONDAY

    THE FOLLOWING MESSAGE IS TRANSMITTED AT THE REQUEST OF THE NEW MEXICO DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENTAL DEPARTMENT.

    AIR QUALITY IMPACTS FROM ONGOING WILDFIRES WILL CONTINUE TODAY BUT BECOME MORE CONFINED TO THE SOUTHWEST QUADRANT OF NEW MEXICO.

    THE EXPECTED DECREASE IN WIND SPEEDS AND MORE WESTERLY DIRECTION OF THE WIND... AND POTENTIALLY DECREASING SMOKE FROM THE EASTERN ARIZONA WILDFIRES... WILL CHANGE THE EXTENT OF THE IMPACT TODAY. THIS COMBINATION OF FACTORS IS EXPECTED TO CARRY THE SMOKE IN A MORE EASTERLY DIRECTION... LIMITING PRIMARY IMPACTS SOUTH OF I 40 AND WEST OF THE NEW MEXICO CENTRAL MOUNTAIN CHAIN.

  • Weiner-gate: Rep admits he sent lewd photo--video extra

    NEW YORK (AP) — After days of denials, a choked-up New York Democratic Rep. Anthony Weiner confessed Monday that he tweeted a photo of his bulging underpants to a woman and admitted to "inappropriate" exchanges with six women before and after getting married. He apologized for lying but said he would not resign.

    Weiner said at a news conference that he had never personally met any of the women he corresponded with online and sometimes via telephone, and was not even sure of their ages. He also said he had never had sex outside of his marriage.

    "This was me doing a dumb thing, and doing it repeatedly, and lying about it," he said.

  • US, Russian lab directors meet in California to plan collaboration

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Russian State Nuclear Energy Corporation (Rosatom) announced the successful completion of the first meeting of the U.S. and Russian laboratory directors since 2004, a step toward improving nuclear security and scientific collaboration.

    The two-day meeting provided an opportunity for U.S. and Russian laboratory directors, and representatives of Rosatom and NNSA to craft the next set of steps toward scientific and technical cooperation in areas that include non-proliferation, fundamental and applied research, energy and the environment, and nuclear medicine.

  • Health care law waivers stir suspicion of favors

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Call it the Department of Waivers and Adjustments. It's doing a brisk business with the new health care law.

    President Barack Obama's administration has granted nearly 1,400 waivers easing requirements of the new health care law, and some critics on the right say Obama is giving his political allies a pass from burdensome requirements everyone else will have to live with.

    But what if the waivers work more like a safety valve? What if during the transition to a new system they can prevent unintended consequences — such as people with bare-bones insurance losing their current coverage, or insurers closing shop in a particular state?

  • Another dry, windy month for Los Alamos, White Rock

    The drought continued in Los Alamos in May. 2011 has brought only 16 percent of the normal amount of January through May precipitation to Los Alamos. White Rock has had only 7.5 percent of the normal precipitation.

    That’s 0.3 inches instead of 4.1 inches through May, with a long way to go to reach the yearly normal 14 inches there. No year has been this dry in Los Alamos County, not since the record began in 1910.  

  • Cabins lost in Arizona fire

    SPRINGERVILLE, Ariz. (AP) — The U.S. Forest Service says at least three summer rental cabins have burned in the Wallow wildfire in the White Mountains of eastern Arizona.
    Eastern Arizona Incident Management Team spokesman Bill Bishop said the cabins are located in the Beaver Creek area south of Alpine. The U.S. Forest Service says the Wallow fire has burned 165 square miles.
    At 106,000 acres, the Wallow fire has now become the fourth-largest in state history.

  • Construction Zone 06-05-11

    Public Works Projects:
    For more information about the projects listed below, please e-mail lacpw@lacnm.us or call  662-8150.

    Diamond Drive Phase 4 2011
    Canyon Closure at Diamond: On June 6, the contractor will be closing both legs of Canyon Road at Diamond Drive. Eastbound Canyon traffic can access Canyon Road from Trinity at 39th Street.
    All driveways on Canyon will remain open except the High School Jock Lot (Griffith Gym). Westbound Canyon through traffic should detour to Trinity at either Oppenheimer or 39th Street. Access the First Methodist Church via University Drive.

  • Update 06-05-11

    LTAB meeting
    Lodgers Tax Advisory Board  will hold its monthly meeting at 1 p.m. Tuesday at the Chamber of Commerce conference room.

    CRC meeting
    The Charter Review Committee will meet at 5:30 p.m. on June 6 at the community training room in the Community Building.

    Council meeting
    The county council will meet at 7 p.m., Tuesday in the council chambers.

    Public meeting
    A public meeting is scheduled for 5:30 p.m. Monday at the Holiday Inn Express to hear feedback on the county administrator search.

  • Campbell ‘contributed to the community in a big way’

    Those who knew Larry Campbell talk of his generous spirit and his contributions to the community. “I don’t think he knew anyone but friends,” said Nancy Cerutti, senior planner for Los Alamos County Community Development Department.

    Laurence (Larry) Campbell died Thursday after a yearlong battle with lung cancer.

    He was 74.

    “He was a dear man who contributed to the community in a big way,” said Nancy Bartlit, a Los Alamos Historical Society board member.

    Campbell retired from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 2001 after 35 years of service. He served as president of both the Historical Society and the Rotary Club and on the board of the New Mexico Historical Society.

  • Critics line up against CMRR project

    It’s a familiar scene in New Mexico: Peace activists, environmentalists and scientists lining up to oppose expansions of the military and nuclear facilities that are a major economic engine for the state.

    They were back in force last week, this time to oppose the “bomb factory,” ‘’cash cow” and “jobs program for scientists” — their names for a $5.8 billion nuclear lab being designed to replace the 60-year-old lab at Los Alamos National Laboratory where scientists make and store the “pits,” or cores, of the nation’s nuclear bombs. It’s a project that has been on the drawing board for nearly a decade, and one that won’t be finished for at least another decade.