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Today's News

  • Thank you

     

    It takes many “elves” to make our community event a huge success. Thank you to everyone who played an “elf” role this year for the Children’s Christmas Bazaar at Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church. We had 77 elves that setup, cleaned up, wrapped gifts, greeted and helped children shop, baked treats and served coffee.  

    One hundred-sixty children attended our event and we hope that the joy they receive in giving their gifts will continue with them throughout the year. Allowing children the opportunity to make decisions on their purchases is the gift of empowerment. 

    Thank you to our community for the donations that make this event possible. It is truly the ultimate in recycling and re-gifting.

  • 12-13-12 Be There

     

    Today

    The holiday Farmers Market will be at Fuller Lodge.

     

    Mesa Public Library presents “Poetry Gatherings,” at 6:30 p.m. in the upstairs rotunda.

     

    The White Rock Family Friendly Series presents “Brave,” at 6:30 p.m. in the White Rock Town Hall.

    Friday

  • Cheetahs making a difference

     

    The Chamisa Cheetahs would like to send people off for holiday shopping, with some baked goods Saturday.

    The sixth graders are working to raise funds for field trips and will bake and craft their way to success.

    From 10 a.m.-3 p.m., the community can start their day by buying baked goods, other healthy treats and a variety of handcrafted items, to aid their efforts. 

    Brandi Weiss is one of the students fundraising to make a difference, by creating items made from Para Cord.

  • Help build a hoop house

     

    Construct and raise beds and plant seeds for the Co-op Hoop House, an educational green house and satellite site for the Los Alamos Youth Food Project.  

    Volunteers will start building at 1 p.m. and clean up by 3 p.m. Sunday at the Co-op. The Middle School Green Team will be among the volunteers working on the raised beds. Hoop House project partners include The Family YMCA, The Los Alamos Co-op, Pajarito Environmental Education Center and the Juvenile Justice Advisory Board. The project was made possible by funding from Los Alamos community members, State Farm Youth Advisory Board and United Way. The Co-op will provide a light snack and warm cider for participants. 

  • Deer crossing

     A deer makes his way across the intersection of 33rd Street and Walnut Tuesday. 


  • Water main break closes one lane on Trinity

     

     

    Eastbound traffic was reduced to one lane on Trinity Drive in the vicinity of 37th Street following a water main break Wednesday.  

    The break was reported Tuesday evening around 8 p.m. In frigid temperatures, gas, water and sewer crews with the Los Alamos Department of Public Utilities worked through the night and into the early morning to dig up the 12-inch line and complete repairs by 7:30 a.m. Wednesday. No customers lost water service.   

    With the assistance of Los Alamos County’s Roads and Streets division, backfilling and patching the road were completed before for the evening rush hour. Traffic controls were removed at approximately 4 p.m. Wednesday.  

  • County survey results now available

     

    Los Alamos County’s bi-annual citizen survey results are now available for the public to review on the news page of the county’s website at losalamosnm.us and LAMonitor.com. 

    In addition, copies for public review are available at the 311 Customer Care Center located at 150 Central Park Square or at the reference desk of either public library.

    The firm under contract to conduct the county’s survey was CRC and Associates, LLC.  They randomly selected approximately 400 county residents to participate in a 20-minute phone survey or street interview. 

    The survey included a variety of questions about county programs and services, community needs, quality of life, media and information resources, openness and transparency of government, economic development and housing needs. 

  • Hiroshima mayor condemns NNSA test

    The National Nuclear Security Administration announced that Pollux, a subcritical experiment, was successfully conducted last week at its Nevada National Security Site.

    The experiment, conducted by staff from NNSS, Los Alamos National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, gathered scientific data that will provide crucial information to maintain the safety and effectiveness of the nation’s nuclear weapons.

    “Challenging subcritical experiments maintain our capabilities to ensure that we can support a safe, secure and effective stockpile without having to conduct underground testing,”NNSA Administrator Thomas D’Agostino said. “I applaud the work done by the men and women who worked to make this experiment successful. Experiments such as this help deliver President Obama’s nuclear security agenda.”

    According to the news website Xinhua, Hiroshima Mayor Kazumi Matsui condemned the United States for conducting a subcritical nuclear test at an underground test site in Nevada.

    As the mayor of the city which suffered the world’s first nuclear bombing in World War II, Matsui said the test is against the global efforts to eliminate nuclear weapons.

  • NMSBA recognizes LANL scientists

     Two Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists have been recognized for their efforts to help the development of small businesses in state.

    Harshini Mukundan of the Physical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy group and Mark E. Smith of the Chemical Diagnostics and Engineering group received Principal Investigator Excellence Awards from the New Mexico Small Business Assistance program for assisting several New Mexico small businesses.

    Los Alamos National Security, LLC, the NMSBA and Northern New Mexico Connect sponsored the recognition event.

    Mukundan was recognized for the assistance she provided to small businesses on two separate projects; bovine tuberculosis detection and better diagnostics for traumatic brain injury.

  • Musicians prepare to pay the piper

    The Los Alamos Board of Education recently approved a measure that would allow the schools to charge a rental fee to outside musical groups looking to use instruments from the high school. 

    For $50 a semester, musicians from the Los Alamos Community Winds and the Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra can rent the high school’s larger instruments for rehearsals, saving musicians the effort of moving their own instruments back and forth to their rehearsal space and other logistical problems. Instruments that fit the category include timpani, bass drums, gongs, xylophones, vibraphones and other percussion instruments.

    According to Kim Lettellier, the school system’s music staff team leader, one reason for the fee is to be fair to the students who are also renting instruments from the school. Students that rent from the district pay $100 during the school year and $50 for the summer. The money goes into a special fund set aside for repairs.

    “It didn’t seem quite fair to me that we expected the students to pay something, but we didn’t expect these outside groups to pay something,” Lettellier said.