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Today's News

  • See ‘Parted Waters’ Sunday

    Los Alamos Little Theatre and Teatro Paraguas of Santa Fe are teaming up to produce a New Mexico Statehood Centennial Event in Los Alamos. “Parted Waters” by local playwright, Robert F. Benjamin, will be produced at  2 p.m. Sunday at the Los Alamos Little Theatre. The performance will be directed by Fran Martone, who starred in the Los Alamos production of “Time Enough” and directed “Galileo’s Footsteps” and “Manhattan Glass” at the 2011 Atomic Theatre Festival. “Parted Waters” is a drama about three generations of a Crypto-Jewish, Hispanic family struggling with its identity in Northern New Mexico. Admission at the door is by donation, with a suggested amount of $10. For more information, visit teatroparaguas.org.

  • Music from Angel Fire presents its 29th season

    In the Northern New Mexico mountain communities of Angel Fire, Taos, Raton and Las Vegas, Music from Angel Fire’s 29th Season will entertain audiences with chamber music through Sept. 2, in 15 concerts featuring works from the Baroque to the Contemporary periods.
    Included among the 2012 artists are Ida Kavafian, artistic director, violin; Ani Kavafian and Pamela Frank, violin; Anne-Marie McDermott, piano; Peter Wiley, cello; Tara Helen O’Connor, flute; Karen Lindquist, harp and Guillermo Figueroa, violin/viola among many others. Steven Stucky is the 2012 composer-in-residence.
    Stucky is the winner of the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for his “Second Concerto for Orchestra,” he is also a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.
    Two themes will run through the 2012 Season of Music from Angel Fire. La Musique de la France — A Season Celebrating Great French Composers honors the 150th anniversary of the birth of the impressionist composer Claude Debussy and the 100th anniversary of the birth of composer Jean Françaix.
    Audiences can expect to hear works by French composers Debussy, Françaix, Poulenc, Saint-Saëns, Ravel, Fauré and Franck as well as compositions by masters from the baroque, classical, romantic and contemporary periods.

  • Book fair slated for Fuller Lodge

    More than 20 authors and publishers will gather to sell their books Sept. 8 at Fuller Lodge, during the first Los Alamos Book Fair, sponsored by the Los Alamos Historical Society and its publishing venture, Bathtub Row Press.
    Between 9 a.m. and 2 p.m., shoppers can meet the authors, discuss their work or pick up a signed copy of a new release to tuck away for a holiday gift. Several recently released titles will be showcased, including Cindy Bellinger’s “Walking on Burnt Mountain, A Spiritual Quest in Los Alamos.”
    And for history buffs interested in the Manhattan Project, Don Farrell’s “Tinian, A Brief History,” has been reissued and will be available. Bathtub Row Press will have the newly-released soft cover of its award-winning book, “At Home on the Slopes of Mountains: The Story of Peggy Pond Church.”
    Shopping and refreshments await visitors to Fuller Lodge, followed by free tours of the Los Alamos Historic District at 3 p.m. for anyone interested in the stories associated with Ashley Pond, the Ice House Memorial and the log and stone houses of Bathtub Row, a preview of the proposed Manhattan Project National Historical Park.

  • Take a garden tour Saturday

    Five Los Alamos households will open their yards to the public from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday as part of the Master Gardener’s Tour.
    The tour is in its 10th year and is produced by the Los Alamos Master Gardeners, in conjunction with the Los Alamos Extension Office and Los Alamos Extension Agent Carlos Valdez.  Gardeners and homeowners looking for answers to questions about growing vegetables and flowers in the area, as well as those looking for landscaping ideas, might enjoy the tour.
    According to Master Gardener Denise George, it will include a variety of approaches to landscape design.
    “The gardens on this tour are very different. Some lots are large and others small. All five residential gardens feature outdoor living space, some have ponds and other water features, most incorporate vegetable areas into their gardens, some emphasize attracting birds and other wildlife, some were designed to require little maintenance,” George said.
    “Visitors should expect to leave with ideas that they might incorporate into their own landscapes. At each location, visitors will be able to ask master gardeners any questions they might have.”
    This year, the following residents will be make up the tour:
    • Shelby and Tony Redondo, 390 Manhattan Loop

  • Norteño Talk

    Getting a grasp on the English language can be difficult, especially for those who were not brought up learning it. After all, there are so many things to consider, especially when words like cool have double meanings. Of course, there’s also words like their, there and they’re, to consider.
    Northern New Mexicans don’t make the task any easier. They seem to have a language all their own. It’s a fusion of American English and Castilian Spanish and produces terms such as acequia, mijo and patrón, which are mixed in with everyday English. It’s not uncommon to hear a native New Mexican speak Spanglish, a mix of English sprinkled with Spanish words here and there.
    While using Spanish terms is commonplace for most New Mexicans, it’s not so easy for tourists and those who have moved to New Mexico to understand the lingo. Until now.
    Mark H. Cross, a proofreader for the New Mexico Legislature, has written “Encyclopedia of Santa Fe and Northern New Mexico,” to help people understand the language and history of New Mexico.
    Cross’ tale of moving to New Mexico is not unique. Like many who fall in love with the Land of Enchantment, he came to visit a friend here and decided to make New Mexico his home. So in 1996, he made the move to Santa Fe and has lived there ever since.

  • Raw Video: Huge Fish Caught, Record Just Missed

    A woman battled a 12-foot, 1,000 lb marlin during a fishing tournament in Hawaii. She won't get credit for a world-record catch because she wound up needing help getting it on her boat.

  • Flash Flood Watch remains in effect

    FLASH FLOOD WATCH REMAINS IN EFFECT THROUGH THIS EVENING...

    THE FLASH FLOOD WATCH CONTINUES FOR

    * A PORTION OF NORTH AND CENTRAL NEW MEXICO... INCLUDING THE FOLLOWING AREAS... CHUSKA MOUNTAINS... FAR NORTHWEST HIGHLANDS... JEMEZ MOUNTAINS... NORTHWEST HIGHLANDS... NORTHWEST PLATEAU... SAN FRANCISCO RIVER VALLEY... SAN JUAN MOUNTAINS... SOUTH CENTRAL MOUNTAINS... SOUTHWEST MOUNTAINS... WEST CENTRAL HIGHLANDS... WEST CENTRAL MOUNTAINS AND WEST CENTRAL PLATEAU.

    * THROUGH THIS EVENING

    * SUBSTANTIAL ATMOSPHERIC MOISTURE CONTINUES PLACE OVER WESTERN NEW MEXICO TODAY... AS WELL AS A GOOD PORTION OF CENTRAL NEW MEXICO. AN UPPER LEVEL LOW PRESSURE TROUGH ALOFT STILL LIES WEST OF THE STATE AND WILL MOVE EAST INTO THE STATE TONIGHT. THIS SHOULD AID IN ADDITIONAL SCATTERED AND POSSIBLY NUMEROUS SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS TO ERUPT WITH THE POTENTIAL FOR LOCALIZED AREAS OF HEAVY RAINFALL. THE DEGREE OF HEAVY RAIN POTENTIAL HOWEVER HAS DIMINISHED A LITTLE IN AREAS NEAR AND WEST OF THE CONTINENTAL DIVIDE... BUT WITH EARLIER MORNING RAINFALL AND ADDITIONAL AFTERNOON DEVELOPMENT THERE IS STILL SUFFICIENT HEAVY RAIN RISK TO WARRANT THE CONTINUATION OF THE WATCH. STORMS SHOULD DRIFT TO THE EAST AND NORTHEAST THROUGH THE AFTERNOON AND EVENING... AND WILL BE CAPABLE OF PRODUCING RAINFALL RATES BETWEEN AN INCH AND TWO AND A HALF INCHES PER HOUR.

  • Today in History for August 23rd
  • Tapia's wife: Boxer died from heart problems

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The wife of the late Johnny Tapia says the six-time world boxing champion's death was related to heart problems and not because of a drug overdose.

    Teresa Tapia said Wednesday that an autopsy report showed that Tapia died from heart disease and hypertension, and that no traces of illegal drugs were found in his system.

    Tapia shared the newly released autopsy report with reporters at a press conference at the later boxer's Albuquerque gym.

    Investigators found one Hydrocodone tablet, a painkiller, on the floor beside his body. They said there were no indicators of an overdose or alcohol use, but that he likely developed medical complications from past illegal drug use.

    Tapia says her husband was taking medication for his bipolar disorder.

  • NASA Rover Curiosity Makes First Mars Trip