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Today's News

  • 10 owners attend NFL mediation with union

    WASHINGTON (AP) — All 10 members of the NFL owners' labor committee and New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees attended Wednesday's mediation session between the league and the players' union, with fewer than 40 hours left until the collective bargaining agreement expires.

  • High court rules for military funeral protesters

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that the First Amendment protects fundamentalist church members who mount attention-getting, anti-gay protests outside military funerals.

    The court voted 8-1 in favor of the Westboro Baptist Church of Topeka, Kan. The decision upheld an appeals court ruling that threw out a $5 million judgment to the father of a dead Marine who sued church members after they picketed his son's funeral.

    Chief Justice John Roberts wrote the opinion for the court. Justice Samuel Alito dissented.

  • Barbour says Obama cheers for higher gas prices

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour, a potential presidential contender, accused the Obama administration Wednesday of favoring a run-up in gas prices to prod consumers to buy more fuel-efficient cars.

  • Senate to send Obama a stopgap GOP spending bill

    WASHINGTON (AP) — In an early victory for Republicans, the Democratic Senate is voting to send President Barack Obama a GOP-drafted measure that cuts $4 billion in spending as the price for keeping the government open for an additional two weeks.

    Sweeping bipartisan support is expected Wednesday for the measure, which passed the House on Tuesday by a 335-91 tally. More than 100 Democrats broke with Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of California to support it.

  • Gunmen kill Christian Pakistan government minister

    ISLAMABAD (AP) — Assailants purportedly sent by al-Qaida and the Taliban killed the only Christian member of Pakistan's federal Cabinet Wednesday, spraying his car with bullets outside his mother's home. It was the second assassination in two months of a high-profile opponent of blasphemy laws that impose the death penalty for insulting Islam.

  • Wis. governor proposes deep cuts for schools, tax cuts

    MADISON, Wis. (AP) — After focusing for weeks on his proposal to strip public employees of collective bargaining rights, Gov. Scott Walker on Tuesday presented his full budget — a plan that cuts $1 billion in aid to public schools and local government but avoids any tax or fee increases, furloughs or widespread layoffs.

  • CBS chief: 'Two and a Half Men' future uncertain

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — CBS Chief Executive Leslie Moonves described the future of crisis-ridden sitcom "Two and a Half Men" as uncertain while star Charlie Sheen spoke of a drug-free life with two "goddess" girlfriends at his home dubbed Sober Valley Lodge.

    Moonves, interviewed at an investors' conference Tuesday in San Francisco, said he hoped TV's top-rated comedy would return to CBS, adding, "We'll see."

  • Los Alamos Co-op Market open for business

    The Los Alamos Co-op Market opened for business at noon Wednesday. It was a “soft” opening to allow for final details to be completed before the official grand opening, which will be announced soon.

    The co-op will be open 7 a.m.-9 p.m., Monday through Saturday and 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Sunday.

  • Money Watch: Think twice before tapping retirement

    Before the housing crisis, it wasn’t uncommon for people to raid their home-equity piggybanks to pay off bills. Plummeting home values and tougher lending standards helped curb that practice, leading some people to engage in a far more disturbing habit: borrowing or withdrawing money from their retirement accounts to cope with financial hardship.
    There may be times when a loan or withdrawal from an IRA or 401(k) plan is your best or only option, but you should be aware of the possible impacts to your taxes and long-term savings objectives before raiding your nest egg.

  • Taking a simple approach

    During the recent weather crisis, when schools were shut to save energy, several school districts were stuck going ahead with school board and bond elections. The voter turnout was as low as you guessed it would be.
    It’s past time to change the way we run school elections in New Mexico. If we think systematically, perhaps we can solve several problems at once, increase voter participation, and save taxpayer money.