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Today's News

  • Topes Notes: Albuquerque takes over first place in division

    The Albuquerque Isotopes took over first place in the PCL American South standings with a 6-3 win over the Round Rock Express Tuesday night.
    Albuquerque (33-25) leapfrogged over Round Rock (33-26) with the win, taking a half-game edge in the division standings. Albuquerque never trailed in the game, scoring single tallies in the top of the first and second innings.
    On a scorching hot night in Round Rock — game-time temperature was 99 degrees — the Isotopes’ bats remained red hot a night after one of team’s biggest offensive performances of the season.

  • Death by mushrooms

    It’s a classic plot device of murder mysteries: an evil killer slips poisonous mushrooms into the frying pan of an unsuspecting victim who dies an agonizing death.
    But in real life, poisonous fungi typically sicken and occasionally kill people for quite different reasons.
    Recently I learned a lot about what can go wrong in the world of mushrooms from Dr. Denis Benjamin, a medical doctor who is also a fungi and poison expert.
    As the weather improves over so much of the nation, this seems like a good time to review how you can avoid having yourself or members of your family join the ranks of those who eat the wrong mushrooms.

  • What’s government really supposed to do?

    Some things are outside the proper scope of government. That much is clear to me.
    But like what? Specific examples are easy. At the federal level, there are ethanol subsidies, nearly everything that happens in the bedroom and specification of the graphics for street signs in neighborhoods. For the latter, see my post at www.capitolreportnm.com.
    At the state level, I’ve been making suggestions for a couple of years in the largely unsuccessful hope of inspiring what is now the Martinez administration. One is closing, for cost reasons, the El Camino Real International Heritage Center, located four miles off Interstate 25 in the middle of nowhere.

  • Be There 06-08-11

    Today
    A flower walk will be hosted by Chick Keller starting at 5:30 p.m. Interested participants can meet at Pajarito Environmental Education Center, 3540 Orange Street, and can carpool to the walk location. For information, visit www.PajaritoEEC.org. The event is free and open to the public.

    Thursday
    Steve Brugger, acting director of the Los Alamos Community Development department, will be the speaker at Lunch with a Leader. Lunch with a Leader, which is hosted by the League of Women Voters, is at 11:45 a.m. It will be at Central Avenue Grill. Brugger will discuss streamlining the planning and building process. Price for the lunch is $15, including tax and gratuity. No reservation is necessary.

  • Cerro Grande Fire victims get scholarship

    The Los Alamos Public Schools Foundation announced that three students from Los Alamos High School’s Class of 2011 have been awarded the Cerro Grande Scholarship.  
    Alexander Austell, Paul Hemez and Rebecca Wright were chosen as the Class of 2011 recipients of the scholarship. To be eligible, students must have lost their family’s homes in the 2000 Cerro Grande Fire and have been enrolled in a Los Alamos Public School at the time of the fire.
    Austell will attend the University of New Mexico and will study music performance and music education.
    Hemez will attend Western Washington University in Bellingham, where he’s planning to study medicine.

  • 'Micromike' to discuss gravionics at PEEC

    The scientist known as Micromike will be the featured speaker at the Pajarito Environmental Education Center Thursday night.
    Micromike, perhaps best known for being discovered living in a cave on Los Alamos National Laboratory property for several years, will speak on the topics of gravionics and sustainability.
    He is the author of the book “Gravionics and a Spiritual Life: How a new philosophy of space and time unites science and spirituality.”

  • Reading of short plays is Thursday

    Los Alamos Little Theater will hold a play reading session Thursday.
    The reading, which will include scripts from LALT’s season-opening production, the 8-by-10 Short Play Festival, is set for 7 p.m. in the little theater’s green room.
    Anyone who is interested in participating or audtioning for roles is welcome to attend.
    Auditions for the plays will be held Sunday and Monday at the theater.

  • Know what kind of tree that is? There's an app for that

    WASHINGTON (AP) — If you've ever wondered what type of tree was nearby but didn't have a guide book, a new smartphone app allows users with no formal training to satisfy their curiosity and contribute to science at the same time.

    Scientists have developed the first mobile app to identify plants by simply photographing a leaf. The free iPhone and iPad app, called Leafsnap, instantly searches a growing library of leaf images amassed by the Smithsonian Institution. In seconds, it returns a likely species name, high-resolution photographs and information on the tree's flowers, fruit, seeds and bark.

  • OPEC leaves output on hold, causing oil price jump

    VIENNA (AP) — OPEC unexpectedly left its production levels unchanged on Wednesday, causing oil prices to jump, as senior officials said their meeting ended in disarray — a stunning admission for an organization that places a premium on consensus decision making.

    OPEC officials said that because of a policy deadlock, the group will maintain present output ceilings with the option of meeting within the next three months to consider a hike.

  • New casino would benefit Jemez Pueblo, report says

    SANTA FE — An off-reservation casino on the Texas-New Mexico border would create 375 jobs and generate $157 million in economic activity.
    That’s according to a new draft environmental impact statement by the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Santa Fe art dealer Gerald Peters and the Jemez Pueblo have proposed building the $55 million casino in Anthony, about 300 miles south of the pueblo.
    The plan was shot down in 2008 by the BIA, which said it was too far from the pueblo to generate jobs for the tribe. But the Obama Administration has reopened review on some off-reservation casinos.