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Today's News

  • Andrew and Mousie 01-13-13
  • Youth Activity Center Schedule 01-13-13

    • Monday: Fuse beads
    • Tuesday: Penguin art in White Rock, 21 in Los Alamos
    • Wednesday: Movies and munchies
    • Thursday: 21 in White Rock, Penguin art in Los Alamos
    • Friday: Wii Friday

    Memberships are free and open to all in third through eighth grade.
    The White Rock Youth Activity Center is at 10 Sherwood Blvd., 672-1565. The Los Alamos Youth Activity Center is at 475 20th St., 662-9412.

  • Word on the Street 01-13-13

    Teen Pulse staff member Ben Hanlon asked high school and middle school students, “What is your New Year’s resolution?”

  • Expect to be entertained

    Years after the popular “Lord of The Rings” movie series was filmed, J.R.R. Tolkien’s “The Hobbit, An Unexpected Journey” was finally released in theaters Dec. 14.  
    Tolkien’s “The Hobbit,” written as a prequel to “The Lord of the Rings,” is distributed by Warner Bros. and is directed by Peter Jackson, who also directed “The Lord of the Rings.”
    The main character, Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman), is a hobbit — a human-like creature — half the size of a man, with large hairy feet.  He lives a comfortable, uneventful life in the peaceful land of The Shire.  
    One evening, Bilbo is interrupted by a company of 11 dwarves and their leader, Prince Thorin Oakenshield (Richard Armitage), along with the wizard Gandalf the Grey (Ian McKellen).  
    They all convince Bilbo to help them reclaim their old kingdom of Erebor and their treasure, which was captured by the dragon Smaug. The troop travels eastward while being chased by fearsome orcs and then getting captured by goblins.  
    It’s in the goblin caves that Bilbo meets the creature Gollum, (voice of Andy Serkis) and comes across a simple gold ring, the ring of power.

  • Fashion Maven: Make a fashionable New Year’s resolution

    I don’t know about all of you, but every time the New Year comes around, I like to make a few resolutions. Maybe some of you have decided that this year you will forfeit meat altogether, strive to get an “A” in your hardest class or learn to drive a car without ever denting it.
    These pledges are all fine and dandy, but how often do you hear someone making a resolution in relation to fashion?
    Style may not be as important as your eating habits, your report card or your car, but it still accompanies you through every single day of the year.
    I believe making a resolution in relation to fashion is of the utmost importance. What fun would your personal style be if you didn’t take it up a notch with every New Year?
    I applaud those of you who have already made a fashion-conscious commitment, such as learning to walk in high heels, vowing never to step into a pair of mom jeans again or deciding that future purchases will be only those that flatter your figure.
    While these goals may be fashion-focused, they are very individual. We need a New Year’s resolution that everyone can adopt and undertake.
    The best fit is what I have dubbed wearable individualism — which is a fancy way of saying that you must use your style to reflect your personality uniquely.

  • More than 1,500 fugitives sought in NM

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Daniel Golden Jr. is an ex-convict who was hanging out at a birthday party in August when he suddenly became belligerent after someone changed the music. Authorities say he grabbed a 9mm handgun and fired several shots in the air before being arrested on a firearms charge.

    Upon his arrest, investigators soon discovered that Golden shouldn't have been walking the streets in the first place because he had violated the terms of his probation. In fact, in the four times Golden had been released from state prison since 2006, he had violated the terms of his release each time.

    He's not the only one in New Mexico. Around 1,500 ex-convicts accused of violating their parole or probation in New Mexico are on the run from authorities, and about a third of them are violent offenders, according to documents obtained by The Associated Press.

  • Today in History for January 12
  • US government tells computer users to disable Java

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is advising people to temporarily disable the Java software on their computers to avoid potential hacking attacks.

    The recommendation came in an advisory issued late Thursday, following up on concerns raised by computer security experts.

    Experts believe hackers have found a flaw in Java's coding that creates an opening for criminal activity and other high-tech mischief.

    Java is a widely used technical language that allows computer programmers to write a wide variety of Internet applications and other software programs that can run on just about any computer's operating system.

    Oracle Corp. bought Java as part of a $7.3 billion acquisition of the software's creator, Sun Microsystems, in 2010.

    Oracle, which is based in Redwood Shores, Calif., had no immediate comment late Friday.

  • Texas Blast: 'All You See Is a House Gone'

    An explosion Friday in a North Texas neighborhood leveled a home that is part of a nonprofit group's affordable housing program, injuring at least three men and scattering debris.

  • Indiana Boy Abducted in '94 Found in Minnesota