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Today's News

  • Update 11-01-12

    Library board

    The Library Board will meet at 5:30 p.m. Nov. 5 at the White Rock Branch Library.

    Parks and Rec

    The Parks and Recreation Board will meet at 5:30 p.m. Nov. 8 at the Larry Walkup Aquatic Center.

    Business grants

    Learn about various grant opportunities available and if they are a fit for your business from 2-4 p.m. Nov. 7 at the Small Business Center, 190 Central Park Square. Call Heather Campbell at 661-4803 for more information.

    Teen Center update

    An update about the Teen Center will be at 5:30 p.m. today in council chambers.

    Meet Me at Mesa

    Meet Me at the Mesa begins at 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. Saturday at the Mesa Library. The program makes the arts accessible to people with dementia.

  • Fire captain gains recognition

    Los Alamos Fire Chief Troy Hughes introduced Capt. Joseph Candelaria to council Tuesday by highlighting one of his most significant accomplishments.

    “I get to come forward tonight with really good news,” Hughes said. “We get to celebrate some of the success we’ve had through building a great partnership with the University of New Mexico-Los Alamos. The partnership has been built through a Fire Science program that is really a great step for our future here in the Los Alamos Fire Department.”

    Council recognized Candelaria with a Leadership Coin for his efforts to create an associate’s degree in fire science at UNM-LA. Candelaria is now UNM-LA’s Fire Science program manager as well as a captain paramedic with LAFD.

    Candelaria began working on development of the program based on the National Fire Academy’s Fire and Emergency Services Higher Education curriculum two years ago. During his presentation, Candelaria downplayed his own role in establishing the program.

    “The Los Alamos County Fire Department is proud to be regarded as one of the highest trained and equipped fire departments in the country,” Candelaria said.

  • School Board Takes on Redistricting

    Don’t worry Barranca Elementary School parents, Los Alamos Board of Education President Kevin Honnell is still in your corner.

    However, due to redistricting, Honnell has been moved from 4 into the same district as Board member David Foster, according to the new plan.

    “What we wanted in this is that we wanted every district to have an elementary school,” LAPS Superintendent Gene Schmidt said, adding that one of the outcomes of the one elementary school, one district plan is that Honnell will now be sharing space with District 4 representative David Foster.

    “One of the things that happens in this new model is that Dave and Kevin’s house placements are now in District 5, but Kevin will still continue to represent his District 4,” Schmidt said.

    Honnell wasn’t at the meeting to comment on the changes, but Foster was. He said the change was fine with him.

    “I don’t see this as a problem, it’s two years out and I think everything has worked out just fine,” Foster said. “When we get elected, we basically focus on the entire school district.”

    When Honnell was contacted later, he said essentially the same thing.

  • Some wary of NMED move

    More details emerged Wednesday afternoon concerning the termination of the Chromium Agreement between the New Mexico Environment Department and the Los Alamos National Laboratory and Department of Energy.

    NMED concluded that the terms of the Chromium Settlement Agreement were met as follows:
    • Payment of a civil penalty in the amount of $251,870.00 on July 13, 2007;
    • Modification of the March 1, 2005 Order was modified on June 28, 2008 to add a section requiring notification of detections and increases in contaminant concentrations in groundwater and that this modification would be a Class 2 modification if made under the Permit;
    • Creation of a publicly accessible database containing information related to the presence and concentrations of contaminants in environmental media; “The termination of the Chromium Settlement will provide continued transparency by allowing public access to a database on reporting requirements stipulated by the Consent Order,” said NMED Secretary Dave Martin.

    “The information provided in the database is important for the public to access in the long-term.”

  • Fall Flight Fest at the LVNWR

    The Las Vegas National Wildlife Refuge, located on Hwy. 281, just east of Las Vegas, will be open each Sunday in November from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. for the Traditional Annual Fall Flight Festival featuring a 4-1/2 mile self-guided auto drive.
    This tour allows visitors to enjoy the short-grass prairie in areas of the refuge that are not open for general public use the rest of the year.
    Visitors can observe directly the impact of current drought conditions on ponds, lakes, marshes and fields. With the lack of water, migrating waterfowl will be limited, but numerous grassland birds such as mountain bluebirds, meadowlarks, horned larks and sparrows along with various wintering raptors will be visible.
    Volunteer roving naturalists will be on hand with spotting scopes to help visitors identify birds. No walking is required. Attendees are encouraged to bird from or close to their vehicle, so birds will not be disturbed. All events at the refuge are free.
    Special Wildlife Kids Crafts, featuring a different themed craft are held each Sunday between 1-3 p.m.
    Interpretive programs are repeated at noon and 1:30 p.m. each Sunday:
    Sunday:  “Live Raptor Presentation” By Santa Fe Raptor Center. This program is ideal for children.

  • Exploring the world

    Pajarito Environmental Education Center will offer the first in a series of three classes on travel and nature journaling taught by Terry Foxx, Katy Korkos and Fairley Barnes Nov. 6.
    The class is on three consecutive Tuesdays from 6-8 p.m., and costs $40 for PEEC members and $50 for all others.
    This price includes all supplies and materials for the three sessions.
    Many are looking for ways to connect with the world through travel or through observing nature.  When traveling, people pack their suitcase with a notebook intended to be a journal.
    The first one or two nights, they are judicious in writing notes, then life overtakes them and they come home with a blank notebook. Or they go on a walk, something catches their eye and they want to remember. But they say to themselves, “I’m not an artist” and they tuck the experience away in memory that soon fades.
    But there is a more permanent way to record explorations. Korkos, Barnes and Foxx will share ways to record observations, feelings,and experiences in a variety of journal types that are simple, easily done and don’t require a mastery of art.
    For more information and to register, visit PajaritoEEC.org, call 662-0460, or email programs@PajaritoEEC.org.

  • ‘True Brit’ is finalist for book awards

    The internationally-recognized, award-winning book, “True Brit — Beatrice, 1940,” written by Santa Fe author Rosemary Zibart and illustrated by Santa Fe artist George Lawrence, has been named a finalist in two categories of the New Mexico/Arizona Book Awards.
    “True Brit” is a finalist in the Young Adult and Historical Fiction categories. The book has previously received a Gold Award for Historical Fiction from Mom’s Choice Awards and was a finalist in the 2011 London Book Awards.
    In “True Brit,” a spoiled English girl, Beatrice Sims, comes to Santa Fe to live with practical, hard-working nurse Clementine Pope.
    At first, the 12-year-old hates the dusty little town. But soon Beatrice makes friends with goofy Arabella, develops a crush on handsome Esteban and aids Ana, a shy Indian girl. First accused of being “faceta” — stuck up, Beatrice learns to change tires, ride wild ponies and helps Clem rescue a sick baby on an Indian pueblo.
    The inspiration for the story came 15 years ago when Zibart was reading the New Mexican newspaper. She noticed in the “50 Years Ago Today” column, a snippet of news about four English girls arriving in Santa Fe.

  • This week on PAC-8, Nov. 2-8

    THIS WEEK ON PAC-8
    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board.

    Friday, November 2, 2012
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! – Live
    10:00 AM Democracy Now!
    11:00 AM County Council Replay (10-30-12)
    03:00 PM Celebration of Aging
    04:00 PM Al Jazeera DC Bureau
    05:00 PM Living Treasures Ceremony Fall 2012
    06:00 PM Democracy Now!
    07:00 PM Los Alamos Historical Society – “Geology of the Rio Grande”
    08:00 PM Clear Heart, Clear Mind
    09:00 PM FSTV

    Saturday, November 3, 2012
    FSTV

    Sunday, November 4, 2012
    06:00 AM FSTV
    05:30 PM Key to the Kingdom
    06:00 PM Drawing Men to Christ
    07:00 PM United Church
    08:00 PM That Which Is
    09:00 PM Trinity on the Hill
    12:00 PM Free Speech TV

    Monday, November 5, 2012
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! LIVE
    10:00 AM Democracy Now!
    11:00 AM Elizabeth Clare Prophet
    12:00 PM Army Newswatch
    12:30 PM League of Women Voters Candidate Forum  10-11-12
    03:00 PM The David Pakman Show
    04:00 PM Al Jazeera DC Bureau
    05:00 PM Education is Hope
    06:00 PM Democracy Now!

  • Restaurant Inspections 11-01-12

    The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.

    Los Alamos

    Aspen Lounge, 400 Trinity Dr.
    Date inspected: Oct. 30
    Violations: One high-risk violation for contaminated equipment — sanitizer didn’t have solution made. One cap of bleach per one gallon of warm water. Corrected.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Hilltop House Convenience Store, 400 Trinity Dr.
    Date inspected: Oct. 30
    Violations: None
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Los Alamos Holiday Inn Express, 60 Entrada Dr.
    Date inspected: Oct. 30
    Violations: Three high-risk violations, two for improper holding — milk, refrigerator needs to be turned down. Corrected; eggs without shell at 45 degrees, corrected, thrown out; sausage at 170 degrees, corrected and thrown out. Food handler said she turned off warmer over half an hour ago, since no customers. One for poor personal hygiene — hand wash sink needs paper towels. Corrected.
    Notes: Milk display refrigerator needs temperature turned down. Corrected.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Santa Fe

    Classic Fare and Catering

  • McDowell to speak at Fuller Lodge

    What are the exact physiological mechanisms that lead to tree death during prolonged drought and rising temperatures?
    These are the questions that scientists are trying to answer at a Los Alamos National Laboratory research project called SUMO. SUMO stands for SUrvival/MOrtality study; it’s a plot of land on the lab’s southern border that features 18 climate controlled tree study chambers and a large drought structure that limits rain and snowfall.
    There is a growing body of evidence suggesting vegetation mortality during drought or periods of high temperatures is rising both locally and globally.
    Resolving these questions is essential to improve global climate models and to improving our understanding and modeling of climate-terrestrial impacts and feedbacks.
    Nate McDowell, a staff scientist in the Earth and Environmental Sciences Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory will share his research methods and results with the community at 7 p.m. today at Fuller Lodge.  
    He was awarded a Director’s Postdoctoral Fellowship at LANL in 2003. McDowell studies the interdependency of plant and ecosystem water and carbon cycles and their response to climate and disturbance.