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Today's News

  • LA's energy work 'game changing'

    As he surveyed one local man’s home that is now primarily powered by the sun, Congressman Ben Ray Luján, D-N.M., described the work being done in Los Alamos County to develop alternative energy as “game changing.”
    Luján made his comment during a visit to Los Alamos Wednesday afternoon. He stopped in at Paul Frederickson’s home to view solar panels, which help power the home.
    The congressman also used the stop to stump for two pieces of renewable energy legislation he recently introduced.

  • State Roundup 04-28-11

    Lobo baseball tops Red Raiders

    LUBBOCK, Texas – The University of New Mexico Lobos got a measure of revenge from a loss earlier this year against Texas Tech Wednesday night, as they beat the Red Raiders 8-4.
    UNM used an early scoring surge to claim the victory over Texas Tech. UNM scored five runs in the first two inning then rallied after Texas Tech cut the lead to 5-4 in the sixth inning.
    Lobo pitcher Bobby Mares earned the victory, throwing five innings of hitless ball and gave up just one unearned run.
    Lobos’ second baseman Kyle Stiner led off the game with a home run. Stiner’s homer was followed up by a RBI single from designated hitter Jake Nelson to give the Lobos an early 2-0 lead.

  • Football: Lockout adds more drama to NFL draft

    NEW YORK (AP) — The NFL draft always is a guessing game. Never has it been accompanied by so much uncertainty.
    Not just who will go first overall — the betting favorite is Heisman Trophy winner Cam Newton — but who goes where and when beyond that. Will the Patriots trade down again and again, as they always seem to do? Or will the Jets trade up, as they normally do?
    This year, the selection process has the added element of players being locked out by owners, and a judge temporarily blocking the lockout earlier this week. Should the league be forced to reopen for business before or during the draft, the result could be even more chaos.

  • Football: Lockout adds more drama to NFL draft

    NEW YORK (AP) — The NFL draft always is a guessing game. Never has it been accompanied by so much uncertainty.
    Not just who will go first overall — the betting favorite is Heisman Trophy winner Cam Newton — but who goes where and when beyond that. Will the Patriots trade down again and again, as they always seem to do? Or will the Jets trade up, as they normally do?
    This year, the selection process has the added element of players being locked out by owners, and a judge temporarily blocking the lockout earlier this week. Should the league be forced to reopen for business before or during the draft, the result could be even more chaos.

  • Tennis: Toppers are the favorites heading into tourney

    Usually the question for the Los Alamos Hilltopper tennis teams heading into the district championships is not whether they will win, but how much will they win by.
    Unfortunately for the rest of the teams in District 2-4A, 2011 isn’t shaping up to be an exception to that rule.
    Both the Los Alamos Hilltopper boys and girls tennis teams will go in as the heavy favorites to continue their domination of District 2-4A Friday. The district tournament starts Friday and continues through Saturday in Santa Fe.
    At the district tournament, the district’s team entries into state as well as the individual entries into the singles and doubles draws will be determined.

  • LANL, community groups reach water settlement

    Los Alamos National Laboratory announced it has reached a settlement with nine community groups and individuals that will result in the dismissal of a 2008 environmental lawsuit on Thursday.

    The suit, filed by the Western Environmental Law Center in Taos, alleged that LANL violated its EPA Clean Water Act permit, and allowed stormwater bearing contaminants from more than 100 legacy (Cold War era) environmental sites to run off at levels above standards —charges LANL denies.

    Under the terms of the settlement, WELC agreed to drop the lawsuit in exchange for access to inspect certain sites, funding for technical consulting and a portion of legal fees.

  • LAPS aces state audit

    Auditors from the New Mexico Public Education Department (PED) have poured through 10,000 files from 34 school districts during the last 10 days, as part of an unprecedented audit to ensure accurate reporting in enrollment.

    Los Alamos and seven other school districts were cleared of all issues regarding special education, special education services and expenses for teacher training and experience, based on a review of records and additional accountability measures established by the department’s auditing team.

  • Israel rejects Palestinian government with Hamas

    JERUSALEM (AP) — Israel's foreign minister warned on Thursday that Israel will not negotiate with a new Palestinian unity government that includes the Hamas militant group.

    Avigdor Lieberman spoke a day after rival Palestinian factions Hamas and Fatah reached a unity deal in Cairo to end their five year long dispute.

    For the Palestinians, the Egyptian-brokered deal revived hopes of ending their bitter infighting that weakened them politically and caused the deaths of hundreds in violent clashes and crackdowns.

    The Palestinians say the move is a step toward independence, ahead of their intention of getting the United Nations to recognize Palestinian statehood in September.

  • Economy slowed by high gas prices, bad weather

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The economy slowed sharply in the first three months of the year as high gas prices cut into consumer spending, bad weather delayed construction projects and the federal government slashed defense spending by the most in six years.

    The Commerce Department said Thursday that the economy grew at a 1.8 percent annual rate in the January-March quarter. That was weaker than the 3.1 percent growth rate for the October-December quarter. And it was the worst showing since last spring when the European debt crisis slowed growth to a 1.7 percent pace.

  • Bernanke sees risks in further steps to spur jobs

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke said Wednesday that the Fed can't take additional steps to try to ease high unemployment without escalating inflation.

    If inflation were to accelerate, the Fed would have to raise rates to slow borrowing and spending and blunt price increases. Hiring might then slow.

    Speaking to reporters, Bernanke became the first chairman in the Fed's 98-year history to begin holding regular news conferences. The session, the first of three scheduled news conferences this year, is part of Bernanke's long-standing campaign to make the Fed more transparent and to cast himself as open and accessible.