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Today's News

  • L.A. forges closer bonds with sister city

    The distance between two sister cities narrowed even more when five delegates from Sarov, Russia boarded a plane, and flew halfway around the world crossing at least 10 time zones along the way to arrive in Los Alamos by Friday evening.
    The purpose of their visit is not simply to sightsee but to participate in a discussion about higher education.
    “We are looking forward to meeting all the educators and learning about the system of education in America,” Facilitator Yevgeniya Cherepovskaya told the Los Alamos Monitor.  
    She added it was the first time traveling to Los Alamos for everyone in the group.

  • Wismer makes funding pitch to transit board

    The North Central Regional Transit District (NCRTD) finance subcommittee will have five funding allocation proposals to consider when it meets next week in Santa Fe.
    County councilor Michael Wismer submitted the fifth proposal at the NCRTD monthly meeting last week in Los Alamos and here were the highlights, according to Wismer.
    • Consolidate the total GRT revenue into one pool, which is estimated to be $6,769,412 for FY12.
    • Dispense with the complex billing system and frequent exchange of checks.
    • Allocate 35% of the consolidated GRT revenues for the NCRTD, which equals $2,382,293 which is $87,120 more than the NCRTD FY11 budget ($2,295,173).

  • Man rushed to LAMC after his truck rolls over him

    A pickup popped out of gear while parked on Alabama Street as its owner was loading a car onto an attached trailer. 

    The man attempted to jump into his black truck to stop it from rolling when he fell on the ground and underneath the truck's rolling wheels.

    He had been directing his wife, who was driving an older model silver Mercedes Benz that they had purchased from a Los Alamos woman living on Alabama Street.

    The couple's son was sitting in the parked truck when the accident occured.

    "It was just one of those unfortunate accidents," said Sgt. Jeff Regenold, who responded to the scene with Cpl. Alfred Roybal and Ofc. Daniel Roberts.

  • Bandelier celebrates National Park Week

    Across the country, National Park Week is being celebrated April 16-24, with free entry to all National Parks and Monuments.
    “We are especially excited to welcome visitors to Bandelier during National Park Week. It’s a good time to appreciate and celebrate how the National Parks preserve our cultural and natural heritage for the enjoyment of the public,” said Superintendent Jason Lott.
    At Bandelier National Monument, activities are planned throughout the nine days, including special ranger-led walks and talks, Pueblo artist demonstrations and a ceremonial ribbon-cutting at the recently refurbished and redesigned Juniper Campground.
    Listeners of local radio station KRSN AM 1490 can hear interviews with Bandelier staff all week.

  • Update 04-10-11

    Spanish dance
    The Pajarito Spanish Dance Alliance will present its first recital of Flamenco and Spanish Dance at 3 p.m., April 16 at Fuller Lodge.

    DPU meeting
    The Department of Public Utilities (DPU) board will meet at 5:30 p.m. April 20 at the DPU conference room. 

    County Council
    The County Council will meet at 7 p.m. April 12 at the fire station in White Rock.

    Special event
    Nationally known Christian singer John Michael Talbot will participate in a special event at Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church and perform April 12-14. Call 662-6193.

  • Examining privatization impacts on national labs

    Jeff Colvin, a staff physicist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, was in town Thursday, but he wasn’t here to talk science.
    He spent a little over an hour discussing what he views as the ill-effects privatization has had on the DOE/NNSA Labs. About 40 people were in attendance to listen at the Best Western Hilltop Hotel Thursday night.
    After it was over, he made a plea to those in attendance, who were mostly employees of the Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    “The other way to support that privatization has been disastrous to the labs and move forward with de-privatization is to join the union,” Colvin said.

  • Belt-tightening continues for LAPS

    Education leaders from around the state spent the latter part of the week at a conference in Albuquerque, hoping to gain an understanding of exactly how much they are expected to trim from their budgets.
    During the legislative session, Gov. Susana Martinez said districts could expect to make a 1.5 percent reduction in their budgets, however, Education Secretary-designate Hanna Skandera recently announced that the unit value used in school funding is down by 3.4 percent, $126.20 per student, rather than the 1.5 percent Martinez talked about.
    Districts already were anticipating cuts because of a halt in federal stimulus dollars and lower state funding. Now they are faced with having to make even deeper cuts.

  • High Winds expected to whip Los Alamos vicinity through Saturday

    A WIND ADVISORY REMAINS IN EFFECT UNTIL 9 PM MDT THIS EVENING.

    * LOCATION... NORTHWEST AND NORTH CENTRAL NEW MEXICO... GENERALLY FROM THE FOUR CORNERS REGION TO THE UPPER RIO GRANDE VALLEY... INCLUDING THE SANTA FE... ESPANOLA... LOS ALAMOS AND FARMINGTON AREAS.

    * WINDS... SOUTH TO SOUTHWEST 25 TO 35 MPH WITH GUSTS UP TO 50 OR 55 MPH.

    * TIMING... WINDS WILL RAPIDLY STRENGTHEN BY MIDDAY ACROSS THE REGION... WITH THE STRONGER GUSTS LATE THIS AFTERNOON. WINDS WILL DIMINISH THIS EVENING.

    * VISIBILITY... MAY BE LOCALLY REDUCED IN DUST PRONE AREAS. SNOW SHOWERS ARE EXPECTED TO INCREASE THIS AFTERNOON AND EVENING OVER THE HIGHER TERRAIN AND VISIBILITIES MAY BE REDUCED BELOW THREE MILES IN BLOWING SNOW.

  • Services set for Rep. Jeannette Wallace Thursday

    Rep. Jeannette Wallace, a longtime Los Alamos resident, passed away at her home Friday.

    Wallace will lie in state from 10 a.m.-2 p.m.Wednesday at the State Capital in Santa Fe, said her son, Terry Wallace Jr.

    A public service is scheduled for 10 a.m. Thursday at the Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church in Los Alamos.

    Wallace, 77, succumbed to various illnesses after a brief visit to the hospital in February, and was working until the day she died, said her son, Terry Wallace Jr.

  • Japan bans planting rice in radioactive soil

    TOKYO (AP) — Fears of radiation spread to rice as the planting season began in Japan, prompting the government to ban its cultivation in contaminated soil as fallout leaking from a tsunami-damaged nuclear plant dealt another blow to the national diet.

    Vegetables and milk were the first foods that sparked concerns about the safety of Japanese agriculture after the March 11 tsunami flooded the nuclear plant and its reactors began to overheat and spew radiation. But those worries intensified when highly radioactive water was spotted gushing from the complex into the Pacific and contaminated fish showed up in catches.

    Those concerns have abated somewhat after the leak was plugged and bans on produce from some areas were lifted.