Today's News

  • Births 01-06-13

    Los Alamos Medical Center reported the following births:

    • Dec. 2: A boy, Justin Lei, born to Yaping Huang and Zhou Lei
    • Dec. 7: A girl, Michaela Karaulanov, born to Budinka and Todor Karaulanov
    • Dec. 7: A boy, Brady Mason Grondin, born to Mindi Macias and Jeremy Grondin
    • Dec. 12: A boy, Frank Guo, born to Bei Yin and Zehua Guo
    • Dec. 21: A boy, Christopher David Rutherford, born to Becky and Perry Rutherford
    • Dec. 22: A boy, David Ignacio Caro, born to Eliza Ulibarri and Ignacio Chavez

  • Annual 8th Grade Washington, D.C spring break trip

    There’s still time to sign up for the annual spring break trip to Washington, D.C.
    This trip is available to Los Alamos Middle School and homeschool eighth-grade students. The trip is private and not school-sponsored.   
    The trip will include sightseeing in and around Washington, D.C. and Baltimore Md. Highlights include the White House, the International Spy Museum,  the Walter Reed Medical Museum, a Capitol tour, the Washington Monument, the Holocaust Museum,  the Smithsonian Museums, the National Zoo, Arlington Cemetery, night tours of the Presidential Monuments, the Iwo Jima, Korean, the Vietnam Memorials, the Newseum, the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial,  the National Aquarium in Baltimore and much more.
    The trip will be four days and three nights in duration. The group will stay in a five-star hotel in Arlington, minutes from the D.C. sites.
    The deadline for receiving the current price on the trip is Jan. 15. After this date, sign-up will continue until airline seats are no longer available, however, after Jan. 15, the price may increase if airline prices increase.  
    Call Roberta Cocking at 505-670-0679 or 623-225-7953 with questions.
     Visit worldstrides.org to sign up for the trip using trip ID Number 77813 or call 1800-468-5899 using same ID Number.

  • Animal Shelter 01-06-13

    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of onsite adoptable pets waiting for their forever home. Others are currently off-campus in loving foster homes.
    Be sure to visit the Friends of the Shelter website, lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating. Also check out the Petfinder page for pictures and to learn more about all of the adoptable pets, petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html.
    This would be a wonderful time to consider giving a home to one of the animals in the shelter. Open Sunday, Monday, but closed Tuesday. All adoptable pets are spayed or neutered, have their shots and are micro chipped.

    Gizmo— Year old, nice, friendly mixed breed boy. He just came in. He is reported to be very clever, so a secure yard will be a must.
    Gracie — Ten to 12-year-old Cocker Spaniel. Rescued off the street and brought back to health by a good neighbor. Not great with other dogs, but a good companion for a quiet family.
    Reggie, Fly and Romper — Border Collie-mix puppy siblings. Seven-months-old, neutered/spayed and up-to-date on shots.

  • News for Retirees 01-06-13

    Jan. 6-12, 2013
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.

    Betty Ehart
    8:45 a.m.    Cardio
    11:30 a.m.    Lunch: Chicken fried steak
    7 p.m.    Ballroom dancing

    8:45 a.m.    Variety training
    11:30 a.m.    Lunch: New England clam chowder
    7 p.m.     Bridge
    7:30 p.m.     Table tennis

    8:30 a.m.    RSVP quilters
    8:45 a.m.    Cardio plus exercise
    10 a.m.    Orientation for Strong People
    10:45 a.m.    Music with Ruth
    11:30 a.m.    Lunch: Pork chop with apple barbecue sauce
    1:15 p.m.    Socrates Café
    1:15 p.m.    Alzheimer’s support
    1:30 p.m.    Daytime duplicate bridge
    8:30 a.m.    Walk in the woods
    8:45 a.m.    Variety training

  • Youth Activity Center Schedule 01-06-13

    Monday: New Years coloring contest, A.C. open from 8 a.m.-6 p.m.
    Tuesday: Snow globes in White Rock, pool tourney in Los Alamos
    Wednesday: Movies and Munchies
    Thursday: Pool tourney in White Rock, snow globes in Los Alamos
    Friday: Staff choice

    Memberships are free and open to all third- through eighth-graders. The L.A. Activity Center is at 475 20th St., 662-9412. The WR Activity Center is at 10 Sherwood Blvd., 672-1565,

  • Fashion Maven: 2012 was a splendid year in fashion

    I can’t quite believe it’s already 2013. Everyone has already made New Year’s resolutions and is leaving 2012 in the dust.
    But last year isn’t about to just disappear. It didn’t just leave with some of the most periodically significant events in history — the presidential election and the Olympics, for example — 2012 also left the legacy of one of the craziest years in fashion.
    Haute couture exploded as designers sought new ways to make unique clothing and accessories.
    Silhouettes ballooned when designers like Comme des Garçons decided to make shirts and dresses excessively large and stiff (so that the models looked as if they were in giant flattened plum costumes) but something in all the grandeur still screamed fashion.
    The amount of color and print on the runway mushroomed. Color blocking, metallics, jewel tones and newly modern colors like ox blood red and mustard yellow made flashy appearances in multiple fashion shows.
    We saw pants patterned with palm trees, exotic flowers and different types of animal prints.
    Sparkles and giant accessories dominated shows and even massive, feather-like “loofah” dresses nearly engulfed models.
    And yet, all of this was translated into a more human, consumer-oriented, wearable form.

  • ‘Life of Pi’ is stunning

    “Life of Pi” is a beautiful film. It is an adaptation of a best-selling book with the same title, by Yann Martel.
    The film is incredibly visually captivating and filled with gorgeous special effects and magnificent cinematography.
    In the film’s plot, the protagonist, Piscine Molitor Patel, also known as Pi, discusses faith and his life’s story with a young Canadian writer.
    Pi tells the younger man of his fascination with all religions from an early age. Subsequently, the protagonist discusses his shipwrecked journey across the Pacific Ocean while sharing a life raft with an adult Bengal tiger called Richard Parker.
    The film is presented in an incredibly dream-like manner and involves many serial images.
    One small problem with the film is that, as a viewer, one gets the sense that there are elements missing from the original novel.
    Another is that the conclusion is somewhat weak and this ultimately diminishes the sense of wonder that the rest of the film worked so hard to establish.
    It is almost as if the film becomes a fable, a spiritual journey rather than a realistic depiction of true events.

  • Coming home for the holidays

    College begins a new chapter in life for both students and families. Students get to see a life outside of Los Alamos and families adjust to missing a family member that is miles away.
    Some young people have described the experience of leaving home as exciting, overwhelming, interesting and sad.
    In contrast, families have said that having a part of their family leaving is sad, but also a proud experience because that person is moving on in life.
    In the months of November and December, the weather gets colder, people’s bank accounts dwindle and the holidays arrive.
    This time of year marks a season of giving, joy and guilt-free eating, but it’s also a time for families to be reunited.
    Aidan Bradbury Aranda, a 2012 Los Alamos High School graduate, is attending the University of Southern California and is majoring in film.
    Bradbury Aranda said that leaving New Mexico was “an interesting change because I was used to living in a smaller town and moving to the big city was exciting, but also a bit overwhelming.” He also said he missed the nature, the stars and green chile.
    Even though he likes California, Bradbury Aranda said, “I like being home because I get to see my family again, as well as my friends, plus I prefer living in my house than in my dorm room.”

  • Local developer arrested on domestic charge

    Los Alamos developer Stan Primak was arrested and charged with aggravated battery against a household member at his home Friday night.

    According to the criminal complaint filed in Magistrate Court, Los Alamos police were dispatched to the 1300 block of 44th Street, after responding to a 911 call at 8:24 p.m.

    Primak’s neighbors, who had earlier been to the Primak residence for dinner, met Cpl. Miguel Maez.

    “As we approached the front door, I immediately observed the victim was bleeding profusely from the nose and her face was covered in blood,” Maez wrote in the complaint. “The victim iwas being assisted by (her friend).”

    According to the statement of probable cause, Stan Primak had locked himself in the bathroom. Maez knocked on the bathroom door and asked Primak to come out.

    Seconds later, Primak, 61, opened the door and was escorted to the kitchen. Primak refused to answer any questions from Maez.

    Primak was arrested and taken to the Los Alamos Detention Center. He later posted a $3,000 cash surety bond and was released.

  • Strong earthquake shakes parts of Alaska, Canada

    JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — A powerful earthquake sparked a tsunami warning for hundreds of miles of Alaskan and Canadian coastline, but the alert was canceled when no damaging waves were generated.

    The magnitude 7.5 quake and tsunami warning that followed caused concern in some coastal communities, with alarms sounding and people rushing to higher ground for safety.

    But the Alaska Tsunami Warning Center later said the waves were too small to pose a threat, reaching just six inches above normal sea level in places such as Sitka and Port Alexander.

    "Initially, in the first 15 to 20 minutes, there might have been a bit of panic," Sitka Police Chief Sheldon Schmitt told The Associated Press in a phone interview. But he said things calmed down as the town waited for the all clear.

    The temblor struck at midnight Friday (1 a.m. PST Saturday) and was centered about 60 miles west of Craig, Alaska, the U.S. Geological Survey said.