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Today's News

  • Word on the Street 11-18-12

    Teen Pulse staff member Tom Hanlon asked students, “What video game are you most excited for in November?”

  • ‘Wreck-It-Ralph’ is no movie wreck

    Those of you who have wondered what happens when the arcade closes, the lights turn off and the doors get locked will finally find out. The Walt Disney computer-animated family movie, “Wreck-It Ralph” shows you.  
    Directed by Rich Moore (of “The Simpsons”), the story starts with an arcade game villain that wants to be a hero in a game that has been around for 30 years.  Wreck-it Ralph, voiced by John C. Reilly, is the character that destroys the buildings that the arcade player constructs.  
    The player then uses the character Fix-it Felix, voiced by Jack McBrayer, to reconstruct the buildings.  Despite Felix’s efforts, villainous Ralph wrecks the buildings again. After years of playing the destroyer, Ralph longs to become a hero. He wants to have a hero’s medal like Fix-it-Felix has — to prove he can be a hero and earn the respect of the other characters in his game.  
    He learns that medals are the awards in another arcade game called “Hero’s Duty,” a first-person shooter game. Ralph and all the arcade characters can move from game to game at night. Ralph sneaks into “Hero’s Duty” disguised as one of the soldiers and meets its leader, Sgt. Tamora Jean Calhoun, (voiced by Jane Lynch of the “Glee” television show).  

  • Hurricane Sandy hits close to home

    For the past few weeks, news of Hurricane Sandy’s aftermath has been seen across the nation. Millions of people have been left without power and shelter.
    The New York Marathon was canceled and places like the Jersey Shore have been destroyed. With a death toll above 110 and an estimated $6 billion in damages, Sandy is being considered the super storm of the decade.
    An advantage of living in a place that’s land-locked is that Los Alamos isn’t susceptible to natural disasters such as Sandy.
    Nonetheless, for the people that have family on the East Coast, Hurricane Sandy hits close to home.
    2006 Los Alamos High School graduate Laura Musgrave, lives in Manhattan. Her mother is Barbara Musgrave, an LAHS biology teacher.
    Barbara said that having her daughter in Manhattan during Hurricane Sandy made her and her husband nervous wrecks.
    She said that the entire time Sandy wrecked through Manhattan, she was on the phone with Laura, but at times reception would be lost.

  • Helping cancer patients look good, feel better

    Cancer is a four-letter word and that word, is hard.
    October was breast cancer awareness month and November is pancreatic cancer awareness month. The Los Alamos Council on Cancer assists men, women and children with free resources, advice and a kind word.
    While the Council on Cancer was founded in 1956, their members still work at full speed, to provide resources to those who have been affected by cancer.
    One of those resources sponsored by the Council on Cancer, along with the United Way of Northern New Mexico is Look Good, Feel Better.
    The meetings begin with a short video presentation by the American Cancer Society and free gift bags for each client.
    The bags are filled with a variety of free products to assist those who have undergone — or are currently going through treatment — with head to toe pampering.
    There are products by Cover Girl, L’oreal, Mary Kay, Bobbie Brown, Esteé Lauder and even Chanel. These major companies took the time to donate products for those going through what may be the most difficult time in their lives.
    The goal isn’t for the women to feel like they need to wear makeup or make themselves look better, but to allow them to have some time to remind themselves that they are still beautiful women, that deserve to shine.

  • Animal Shelter 11-18-12

    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on site adoptable pets waiting for their forever home.
    Come find a companion that will give you unconditional love. Be sure to visit lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating.
    All adoptable pets are spayed or neutered, have their shots and are micro chipped. Visitor guides: Between 4-6 p.m. Friday, volunteers will be at the shelter to give potential adopters personal introductions to the adoptable animals.
    DOGS
    Autumn — This spayed female is one of those rare breeds that doesn’t come around very often — a New Mexico Brown Dog. She is housebroken and leash-trained, just don’t try to force her to be friends with any dog smaller than her.
    Axle — Don’t let those sad-looking eyes fool you. Axle is a playful and affectionate neutered male. The shelter temperament testers describe this Pit-mix as a “total sweetheart.” He would love a family that appreciates big, sloppy dog kisses.  
    Ciera — Spayed female Shepherd-cross who likes to get to know her human associates before she shares her story with them.

  • News for Retirees 11-18-12

    Nov. 18-24
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.

    Betty Ehart
    MONDAY
    8:45 a.m.    Cardio
    10 a.m.        Advisory Council and LARSO Board meeting
    11:30 a.m.    Lunch: Barbecue beef sandwich
    12:30-3:30 p.m.    Flu shots available for seniors
    7 p.m.        Ballroom dancing
    TUESDAY
    8:30 a.m.    Mac users
    8:45 a.m.    Variety training
    10 a.m.    Computer users group
    11:30 a.m.    Lunch: Sweet ‘n sour pork
    11:30 a.m.    Open enrollment
    1 p.m.        Bingo
    7 p.m.        Bridge
    7:30 p.m.    Table tennis

    WEDNESDAY
    8:30 a.m.    RSVP quilters
    8:45 a.m.    Cardio plus exercise
    10:45 a.m.    Music with Ruth
    11:30 a.m.    Lunch: Fish (tilapia)

  • Valles Caldera announces winter schedule

    Snowshoeing, cross country skiing and sleigh rides highlight a full calendar of winter activities announced by the Valles Caldera National Preserve.  
    The schedule also includes two free snowshoeing and skiing access days. Winter hours are from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays at the Valle Grande Staging Area.
    An expanded holiday schedule will run every day from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Dec. 26 through Jan. New this season, the preserve will remain open for the Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday, Jan. 21 and for President’s Day, Feb. 18.  
     Skiing and snowshoeing open the season on Dec. 7, weather permitting. Fees are $10 for adults, $8 for seniors (62 years and older), $8 for youth (5-15 years) while kids four and younger are free. Five-day passes are available for $40 per adult and $32 for seniors and youth.
    Reservations are not required but all must check in and depart from the Valle Grande staging area. Also, the Valle Grande Trail, Coyote Call Trail and the surrounding area on the south side of N.M. 4 will remain open every day for hiking, skiing and snowshoeing free of charge.

  • Update 11-18-12

    Special Section

    Look for “The Spirit of Giving” special section in Thursday’s Los Alamos Monitor. The publication will be packed with information to help you shop smarter, not harder.

    Trash collection

    In observance of Thanksgiving, there will be no trash or recycling collection on Nov. 22 or Nov. 23. If Thursday or Friday is your normal pickup day put out trash and recycling by 8 a.m. Nov. 21 for collection. 

    Office closed

    The Los Alamos Monitor office will be closed in observance of Thanksgiving Day, Thursday. Normal office hours will resume Friday.

    County Council

    The Los Alamos County Council will meet at 7 p.m. Nov. 27  in council chambers.

    Library board

    The Los Alamos County Library Board holds regular meetings the first Monday of each month (excluding holidays) at 5:30 p.m. in the Mesa Public Library Board Room or at White Rock Branch Library. The next meeting is Dec. 3.

  • WIPP appeal filed against NMED

    Southwest Research and Information Center and Margaret Elizabeth Richards filed a Notice of Appeal in the New Mexico Court of Appeals against the New Mexico Environment Department decision of Nov. 1, to allow “hot” Remote-Handled transuranic nuclear waste in shielded containers to come to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.

    The appellants and approximately 200 individuals argue that the request to modify the state’s WIPP permit be subject to a public hearing because of the dangers posed by RH waste, the technical complexity of handling RH waste at WIPP and the substantial public interest in the request.

    NMED approved the Department of Energy request although the state agency had in December 2011 and January 2012 rejected virtually the same request.

    “SRIC feels that the permit request was incomplete and did not adequately address the real reason that DOE wants shielded containers — there is not enough space for RH waste because of the way the facility has been mismanaged. State law requires a public hearing, but since NMED rubberstamped the request, we have no choice but to sue,” said Don Hancock of SRIC.

  • Coalition gets heads-up on D.C.

    Attorney Seth Kirshenberg has his finger on the pulse of Washington.

    The D.C. based attorney has helped Los Alamos County with issues regarding the Department of Energy. And he also is the director of the Energy Communities Alliance of which the Regional Coalition of LANL Communities is a member.

    Kirshenberg was in town Friday to address the coalition and offer it a glimpse in what to expect in Washington now that the election season is over.

    Kirshenberg told the coalition that there are three things it needs to be doing as the New Year approaches.

    He said the coalition needs to plan ahead, identify priorities and understand the environment in Washington.

    “And that is not always easy,” said Kirshenberg, who works at the firm Kutak Rock in Washington.

    Primary issues facing the lame-duck Congress is a possible fiscal cliff where sequestration might take effect if a budget agreement is not in place by the end of the year. Sequestration would trigger mandatory budget cuts of $1.2 trillion and would cause massive financial headaches for DOE facilities including the Los Alamos National Laboratory.