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Today's News

  • 10 things to know for Friday

    LAS VEGAS (AP) — Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and stories that will be talked about on Friday:

    1. MONEY POURING INTO RACE FOR THE WHITE HOUSE — $2 BILLION WORTH

    The eye-popping figure puts this election on track to be the costliest ever.

    2. THE WORLD WAITS TO SEE IF CEASE-FIRE HOLDS

    U.N. chief urges all influential countries to pressure both sides to stop the violence in Syria's civil war.

    3. WHY THE U.S. DIDN'T INTERVENE DURING THE LIBYA CONSULATE ATTACK

    Panetta says military leaders lacked adequate intelligence to risk American forces in a chaotic situation.

    4. HARD-LINERS TAKING HOLD IN ISRAEL

    Netanyahu strikes a deal with his right-wing foreign minister to create a hawkish superparty.

  • Cost overruns halt security project at TA-55 -- updated

    For the past seven years, the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the National Nuclear Security Administration have been working on a $213 million project to enhance the security at Technical Area 55.

    It was supposed to be completed in June.

    But there was one big problem.

    The multi-million dollar system does not work.

    And according to NNSA’s notification to Congress, it could cost between $21 million and $25 million to remedy the situation.

    The project was specifically designed to upgrade physical security systems, protection strategies and security requirements in the lab's Technical Area-55, which houses the Plutonium Facility (PF-4).

    LANL spokesperson Kevin Roark said this morning the laboratory discovered and reported to the NNSA a construction defect from the 2010 timeframe, and a pair of separate technical issues, resulting in a completion delay for the TA-55 Plutonium Facility security perimeter upgrade project.”

    Roark said the delay does not impact the site’s nuclear materials security and the length of the delay has not yet been determined.

  • AP Writer: Science Behind 'Frankenstorm'
  • Precision shooters travel to OTC

    Five precision shooters from Los Alamos High school NJROTC went to Colorado Springs to the Olympic Training Center to compete in the Men’s and Women’s Air Rifle portion of the monthly tournament Oct. 19. The course of fire at a distance of 10 meters for men is 60 shots and for women 40 shots in the standing position. The top shooter for the team was Brandon Frank with a 557. Samuel Wolfe was second with a 547, both exceeding the necessary score of 534 to qualify for the Distinguished Expert Badge for international. Tessa Snyder fired a 345/400 just one point below the Distinguished Badge qualifying score. Former cadet Cory Miller also traveled from The University of New Mexico to Colorado Springs to participate in this event. In December, the five cadets will fire qualifying matches in both air rifle and small bore for the Junior Olympics in March 2013.

  • Be There 10-25-12

    Today
    Join the Parent Raising Teen Club from 6-7:30 p.m. at the Unitarian Church, 1738 N. Sage Loop. Share your worries and find like-minded parents that can offer support. The group will meet each Thursday evening through Nov. 29. For more information, call Elizabeth Grant at 660-5796.

    The LAHS NJROTC will host a Barbecue Brisket Night from 5:30-7 p.m. at the Posse Lodge on North Mesa. The cost is $10 per plate and includes brisket, potato salad, vegetable, a roll, drink and dessert.

    The Authors Speak Series presents “Margaret Wood: O’Keeffe Stories,” at 7 p.m. in the upstairs rotunda of Mesa Public Library.

    Friday
    Coffee with Kristin Henderson is at 10 a.m. at the Coffee Booth.

    The Hallowiener Parade will be at 5:30 p.m. on the north side of Ashley Pond. All Dachshund owners are encouraged to dress their pet in costume and meet at the pond. The parade will start around 6 p.m., ending across from CB Fox for a costume contest.

  • Byrd Spreads the Word

    Third District candidate Jeff Byrd stopped by Los Alamos’ Republican headquarters Wednesday to see some of his supporters, talk strategy and tell them how he’s differentiating himself from his Democratic opponent, Ben Ray Luján.

  • Local Courts: On the Docket 10-25-12

    Oct. 23

    Nicole Blanchard was found guilty of use or possession of drug paraphernalia by the Los Alamos Magistrate Court. Blanchard was ordered to pay a $50 fine and a $148 in court fees. She was sentenced to a year of supervised probation.
    Conditions of probation are that the defendant will obey all laws and not be arrested or indicted for any other charge during probation. Defendant will obey all court-ordered conditions of probation. Defendant shall not possess or consume alcohol during probation or enter an establishment that serves liquor. Defendant shall not possess a weapon or destructive device during probation and defendant shall maintain contact with probation officer throughout the probation period.

    Tessa Lopez was found guilty of disorderly conduct by the Los Alamos Magistrate Court. Lopez was ordered to pay $73 in court fees and ordered to undergo six months of supervised probation.

  • Update 10-25-12

    Trick or Treat

    Trick or Treat on MainStreet will be from 4 p.m.-6:30 p.m. Friday in downtown Los Alamos.

    Authors Speak

    Mesa Public Library’s Authors Speak Series presents Margaret Wood, companion of Georgia O’Keeffe at 7 p.m. today.

    County Council

    The Los Alamos County Council will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday in council chambers.

    Brisket night

    The LAHS NJROTC will host a Barbecue Brisket Night from 5:30-7 p.m. today at the Posse Lodge on North Mesa. The cost is $10 per plate and includes brisket, potato salad, vegetable, a roll, drink and dessert.

    Meet the councilors

    Several of the Los Alamos County Councilors will be at the Health Fair Saturday to visit with residents about current projects, issues and other topics. Look for them at the library’s booth.

  • LANL scientist to speak Monday

    Los Alamos National Laboratory scientist Michael Graesser will describe the Higgs boson particle during a Frontiers in Science series talk at 7 p.m. Monday in the Duane Smith Auditorium at Los Alamos High School.
    “A new particle was discovered last summer at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Switzerland. The Higgs boson gives mass to quarks and the electron but we don’t know yet if this new particle is the Higgs boson,” said Graesser, of the Laboratory’s Theoretical Division. “I will describe what we know about this new particle and speculate about discoveries that might now be on the horizon.”
    Graesser will do similar discussions at the following locations:
    • Nov. 2 in the James A. Little Theater of the New Mexico School for the Deaf, 1060 Cerrillos Road, Santa Fe
    • Nov. 8 in the Nick Salazar Center for the Arts, Northern New Mexico College, 921 Paseo de Oñate, Española
    • Nov. 9 at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, 1801 Mountain Road N.W., Albuquerque.
    All the talks begin at 7 p.m. and are free and open to the public.

  • Councilors object to separate ordinances

    A number of Los Alamos County councilors objected  to having separate ordinances, since the CRC had urged that the changes be voted on as one ordinance.
    “I believe a single ballot question makes the most sense because we tried to balance the supermajority question with some of the additional clarification on the independence of both the utility manager and the utility board,” said Harry Ettinger, who chaired the subcommittee on utilities for the CRC.
     “I’m torn between the practicalities of what I think may pass and overall what I think is the best product,” councilor David Izraelevitz said. “I think overall the best product is the full set of recommendations the CRC has presented. We could break it up. My preference would be to present the entire packet to the public, because there are interactions, such as additional latitude given to the Board of Public Utilities.”
    Izraelevitz offered a substitute motion to that effect.
    Councilor Vincent Chiravalle said that all 10 changes should have separate ordinances.
    “If you do that, you could end up with a disjointed charter where the pieces did not fit together properly,” Rennick said.