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Today's News

  • Davie, Lobos looking to turn things around in 2012

    ALBUQUERQUE — Coming off three consecutive one-win seasons and a turbulent era under Mike Locksley that saw the first-time head coach fired in the middle of last season, the University of New Mexico’s football program is struggling to make progress.
    Former Notre Dame coach Bob Davie has been brought in to restore some Lobos luster, but he last walked the sidelines a decade ago, spending the time since as an analyst with ESPN.
    And Davie acknowledged things are far from glowing as New Mexico prepares for the upcoming season.
    “I’m sure every team we play, they’re looking at that schedule and saying, ‘We’re going to beat New Mexico,’ “ he said.
    This despite returning 16 starters on both sides of the ball, among the most in the Mountain West.
    “We don’t care how many players we have back,” Davie said. “Because they haven’t won, so I don’t know that that matters a whole lot. We’re really starting over.”
    The makeover starts with the offense, which will be employing a hybrid, shotgun/option package.

  • Sports Update 08-22-12

    Golf tourney will benefit LA baseball, softball
    The Los Alamos Hilltopper baseball and softball teams will host a fundraising golf tournament Saturday.
    The Diamonds in the Rough tournament is scheduled for a 1 p.m. shotgun start at Los Alamos Golf Course. Price for participation is $80 per player, which includes greens fees, cart and dinner.
    The tournament is a 4-player scramble, blind bogey format. Prizes for top scores and closest to the pin will be awarded.
    For registration or hole sponsorship information, call Jamie Aslin at 699-2320 or Roger Anaya at 670-6717.

  • Scrimmages set for Saturday

    While most Los Alamos High School sports aren’t officially getting their seasons started just yet, there will be plenty of them in action Saturday.
    The fall 2011 season for most teams gets going next week, but Saturday the Los Alamos football, volleyball and cross country teams will all be involved in preseason events.
    The Hilltopper football team, which is coming off a 2011 postseason appearance, its first in three years, will travel to Bloomfield for a preseason scrimmage. The Hilltoppers, who have several key offensive and defensive players returning this season, topped Bloomfield during the 2011 regular season, winning in a nail-biter, 21-20.
    Closer to home, the Los Alamos volleyball team will take part in the Española Valley Jamboree preseason scrimmage. That scrimmage will be hosted by the Hilltoppers’ arch-rivals, the Española Valley Sundevils.
    That scrimmage is scheduled to start at 8 a.m.
    In cross country, both the Hilltopper boys and girls teams will be at La Cueva for a preseason scrimmage. The Hilltoppers and Bears regularly meet in the preseason in Albuquerque.

  • As Storm Nears, Tampa May Evacuate RNC

    The mayor of Tampa, Florida, says public safety will trump politics if Tropical Storm Isaac threatens the city during the Republican National Convention next week.

  • New system streamlines to build profits

    In today’s ultracompetitive environment, businesses need to get their product or service to customers faster than ever. Shorter delivery times aren’t just good for customer satisfaction; the longer it takes to get a product from the order desk to the customer, the longer the business waits to be paid.
    Meanwhile, the company has its own bills to pay, including loan interest and materials invoices. The briefer an order is in production, the better. Knowing this, savvy companies implement lean manufacturing techniques to periodically evaluate their product flow and processes – and adjust as necessary for maximum efficiency.
    Keeping it simple
    Companies can sometimes cut production time and eliminate waste by carefully studying how products and paperwork flow through office and manufacturing processes. New Mexico Manufacturing Extension Partnership, or New Mexico MEP, helps businesses refine this flow. The nonprofit organization conducts workshops around the state, one of which – on the 5S System – aims to help businesses improve workplace organization and standardization. The 5S System is just one tool New Mexico MEP uses when assisting businesses with company-wide transformation toward efficiency.

  • CRC: How it all got started

    With the election on the horizon, most are aware of the fact that there will be four questions on the ballot that relate to potential changes to the Charter for the County of Los Alamos.  Specifically, the questions for consideration for the November 2012 election deal with the provisions for Initiative, Referendum and Recall.  
    I believe it would be helpful to provide a little background on why the Charter Review Committee was formed and outline exactly what the council tasked the committee to do.  In 2009, amid an environment where  a variety of questions surfaced about the Charter and the home rule powers of government, the council-manager form of government,  the ability of citizens to understand and use the initiative  and referendum provisions, the need for elected sheriff and clerk positions and validity of the system of  partisan balance on Boards and Commissions.

  • ECA peer exchange tackles environmental issues

    The Energy Communities Alliance (ECA) had a peer exchange in Los Alamos last week. It was the first time ECA has met here in more than five years.

    The main topic of discussion was environmental management (EM), although other issues of concern to the participants were also discussed in length.

    Seth Kirshenberg, executive director of ECA, began a series of panel discussions Thursday with a summary of current issues.

    Kirshenberg reported that Congress is expected to pass a six month continuing resolution until a new budget is passed, with provisions that could impact DOE communities.

    The main concern was a new limitation that prevents agencies from moving money around. In the past, Department of Energy Environmental Management (DOE-EM) had considerable flexibility in directing money to the most urgent environmental cleanup needs at each site.

    "The bottom line is, we don't have that flexibility to move money between the major control elements if the CR passes as it is today," Kirshenberg said.

  • NM forecasts 4% revenue growth in next budget year

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — A new financial forecast estimates more than $270 million will be available to lawmakers and Gov. Susana Martinez for budget increases next year.

    Top officials in the Martinez administration outlined the revenue projections on Wednesday to the Legislative Finance Committee during a meeting in Angel Fire.

    The state expects to collect $5.9 billion during the 2014 fiscal year, which starts next July. That's $272 million more than the state will spend this year. That's also the pool of so-called new money available for spending increases on public education and other government programs as well as to offset any tax cuts that may be enacted.

    Lawmakers estimate that several obligations in current law, such as higher public employee pension payments by the state, will require $74 million of the money.

  • Public hearing held on nuke fuel disposal

     Anti-nuclear activists are questioning a proposal to ship more plutonium to New Mexico.

    Several activists lined up Tuesday evening in Los Alamos for the first in a series of public hearings on how best to dispose of surplus plutonium from the nation's nuclear weapons program.

    One plan being studied by the Department of Energy calls for the shipment of 7 metric tons — or what one activist estimates is enough to power nearly 3,000 warheads — to Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Savannah River site in South Carolina for processing into fuel for commercial nuclear reactors.

    The plan also calls for another 6 tons of surplus plutonium to be disposed of at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad, N.M.

  • Family Wants More Answers About Handcuffed Death

    Chavis Carter's family hasn't accepted the official explanation for his death: that he was on meth when he fatally shot himself while his hands were cuffed behind him in the backseat of a patrol car in Arkansas.