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Today's News

  • Forest gets new deputy supervisor

     Joe Norrell is the new deputy forest supervisor for the Santa Fe National Forest. Norrell brings 14 years of federal service experience to the Forest Service and the local community.
    He chose Santa Fe due to the challenges of working on complex issues with people that have a rich history and strong connection to the land.
    Norrell, who grew up in Alaska, attributes his career and passion for the outdoors to his parents. His father was a professor at the University of Alaska-Anchorage, which helped afford the time to take him and his sisters on many camping, hiking and fishing trips during the summer months.
    He listened to his mother who worked for the Alaska State Legislature talk about politics and how the decisions made by the legislature would impact people, which influenced him to consider a career in public service.
    He attended Montana State University, receiving his bachelor’s degree in political science and master’s degree in public administration. Beginning in 1998, Norrell worked for the Alaska Department of Natural Resources as a temporary research assistant and three years for Alaska Sen. Ted Stevens in Washington, D.C. as a staff assistant on the Committee on Appropriations. Two of those years he spent working on the Interior and Natural Resources Subcommittee.

  • Elks collect toys for girls and boys

    The Elks Lodge set up an Angel Tree and worked with the Immaculate Heart Catholic church in Pojoaque and St. Vincent de Paul to provide gift packages for needy children. Pictured, left to right: Dave Williams, kneeling; Natalie Dimitruck (project chair); Jim Hay, Reine Williams, Mike Johnson, Holly Brown, Mark Sandoval, Trish Sandoval, Dick Bjarke.

  • Assets in Action: Good deeds abound

    This week, so many nice things have taken place — and I would like to highlight a few.
    On Thursday, the employees of Los Alamos Medical Center were asked to take part in a Day of Compassion. They were to tell a fellow employee something they appreciate about them.
    What a wonderful idea for someone to try at their workplace.
    Warren Tidwell began a Facebook page to do 26 acts of kindness, one for every student and teacher killed in the tragic event.
    NBC’s Ann Curry decided to bring attention to the acts of kindness and it continues to gain steam and bring some degree of meaning to a senseless act.
    One local teacher decided to do 26 random acts of kindness. She purchased a handmade cross and presented it to one of her students who is dealing with cancer.
    She stopped by the house of another local youth and donated $20 to the teen who will be taking a trip, to improve the lives of those less fortunate.
    Many continue to make get well cards for a local youth injured in a car accident and for local Police Chief Wayne Torpy. If you haven’t had a chance to contribute, there’s still time.
    Many nominated local residents for the Community Asset Awards. The ages of those nominated range from 13-83. We will provide more information on that during the coming weeks.

  • Zhao is student of the month

    Jessie Zhao, a senior at Los Alamos High School, was recently honored as Rotary Student of the Month for December.
    Zhao is the daughter of Shaoping Chu and Xinxin Zhao and sister of William and Steven Zhao.
    The Rotary Club of Los Alamos selects one student each month of the school year to honor as a Student of the Month.
    In addition to high school seniors, high school juniors are now eligible for the recognition.
    Students are nominated by their teachers and chosen on the basis of their academic achievement, extra-curricular activities, and in particular, their service to the community.
    Zhao is an active member of the LAHS Hilltalker Speech and Debate Team, an award-winning club, and currently serves as team president. In addition, she is a member of the National Honor Society and Key Club, and a youth leader for Café Scientifique, organizing lectures for teens to explore the latest ideas in science and technology.
    In her junior year, Zhao volunteered at the White Rock Branch Library as an assistant in the youth summer reading program, and earlier this year, she began serving as a junior volunteer at the Los Alamos Medical Center, where she is a nurse assistant in the intensive care and surgical units.

  • Be There 12-25-12

    Thursday
    The Los Alamos Big Band will present their annual Christmas Dance from 7:30 p.m.-10:30 p.m. at the Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church Parish Hall, 3700 Canyon Road. The dance will be a special performance to honor the memory of Cathy LeClaire, a former member of the Big Band vocal quartet, the Mountainaires. LeClaire, her husband Rene with Steve and Terry Coggeshall, sang for many years with LABB in the style of the Glenn Miller quartet, the Modernaires. Rene will be the guest vocalist for the upcoming dance. All are welcome to come and dance or just sit and listen to live, authentic Big Band music. Admission is free, although contributions to the Cathy LeClaire Memorial Organ Fund will be welcome.  
    Dec. 31
    Los Alamos Little Theatre presents Frost/Nixon. Special New Years Eve performance at 8:30. Also at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 4, 5, 11, 12, 18 and 19; and 2 p.m. Jan. 13. Tickets $12/adults, $10 students/seniors and available at CB Fox and at the door. lalt.org, 662-5493.
    Jan. 4

  • 'Run, Run Rudolph' at 334 Garver Lane

    Here is a clip from the nightly light display in front of 334 Garver Lane. The lights in front of the house are synched up to music that can be heard by tuning in 93.7 FM near house. The display is on nightly.

  • Christmas Celebrated Around the World

    Christian faithful from around the world packed into churches on Christmas Eve to mark the beginning of the Christmas holiday with midnight mass.

  • Today in History for December 25th
  • Durning, king of character actors, dies in NYC

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Charles Durning, the two-time Oscar nominee who was dubbed the king of the character actors for his skill in playing everything from a Nazi colonel to the pope, died Monday at his home in New York City. He was 89.

    Durning's longtime agent and friend, Judith Moss, told The Associated Press that he died Monday of natural causes in his home in the borough of Manhattan.

    Although he portrayed everyone from blustery public officials to comic foils to put-upon everymen, Durning may be best remembered by movie audiences for his Oscar-nominated, over-the-top role as a comically corrupt governor in 1982's "The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas."

    Many critics marveled that such a heavyset man could be so nimble in the film's show-stopping song-and-dance number, not realizing Durning had been a dance instructor early in his career. Indeed, he had met his first wife, Carol, when both worked at a dance studio.

  • 'Odd Couple' Actor Jack Klugman Dies