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Today's News

  • ‘Lincoln’ director Spielberg speaks in Gettysburg

    GETTYSBURG, Pa. (AP) — Two-time Academy Award winning director Steven Spielberg expressed a sense of humility Monday as he delivered the keynote address during ceremonies to mark the 149th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s “Gettysburg Address.”
    “I’ve never stood anyplace on earth where it’s easier to be humbled than here,” said Spielberg, whose biopic about the 16th president is currently in theaters.
    His remarks were made at the annual event at the Soldier’s National Cemetery in Gettysburg, near the site where Lincoln gave the famous oration amid the American Civil War in 1863, four months after the battle in which the Union turned back an invasion of the North by Confederate troops under Gen. Robert E. Lee.
    After spending seven years working his new movie “Lincoln,” Spielberg said the president came to feel like one of his oldest and dearest friends, and he sensed he was living in the presence of what he called Lincoln’s “eloquent ghost.”
    “Lincoln wanted us to understand that equality was a small ‘D’ democratic essential,” Spielberg said, describing Lincoln’s three-minute speech as “his best and truest voice” and the single “most perfect prose poem ever penned by an American.”

  • This week on PAC-8, Nov. 23-29

    Friday, November 23, 2012
    Happy Thanksgiving –
    No local programming
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! – Live
    10:00 AM Democracy Now!
    06:00 PM Democracy Now!
    09:00 PM FSTV

    Saturday, November 24, 2012
    FSTV

    Sunday, November 25, 2012
    06:00 AM FSTV
    05:30 PM Key to the Kingdom
    06:00 PM Drawing Men to Christ
    07:00 PM United Church
    08:00 PM That Which Is
    09:00 PM Trinity on the Hill
    12:00 PM Free Speech TV

    Monday, November 26, 2012
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! LIVE
    10:00 AM Democracy Now!
    11:00 AM Elizabeth Clare Prophet
    12:00 PM Army Newswatch
    12:30 PM Amy Goodman at Fuller Lodge – “The Silenced Majority”
    02:30 PM Albuquerque Balloon
        Fiesta 2012
    03:00 PM The David Pakman Show
    04:00 PM Al Jazeera DC Bureau
    05:00 PM Education is Hope
    06:00 PM Democracy Now!
    07:00 PM Los Alamos Historical
        Society- “A Brief History of
        Wendover Airfield”
    08:30 PM Atomic City’s Got Talent
    10:00 PM Classic Movie –
        “Chamber of Horrors”

  • Giving thanks for football...

    If you’ve ever seen me, you can pretty easily come to the conclusion that I don’t skip a lot of meals.
    I was, at one time, more height-weight proportionate than I am now, but that was then.
    But again, as you might be able to decipher without any Sherlock Holmes-esque deduction skills, I also like Thanksgiving.
    Thanksgiving is, truth be told, my favorite non-Santa Claus-associated holiday.
    Other than Father’s Day, Thanksgiving Day is the only day I can really lounge around the house and do nothing not of my own choosing.
    I realize that sounds terribly unfair to my wife, but in truth, she’s very happy in the kitchen.
    I’m very happy eating turkey and mashed potatoes. It’s a match made in Heaven.
    But, long about now, the annual grousing begins about whether the Dallas Cowboys and Detroit Lions should have exclusive rights to the Thanksgiving Day football games.
    Thanksgiving Day games are nearly as iconic as that Super Bowl thing you may have heard about.
    Football and overeating. Also, truly a match made in Heaven.
    For football fans in New Mexico and surrounding areas, I understand your frustration.

  • Romero wins Turkey Trot

    Ted Romero was the fastest finisher at the 2012 Turkey Trot.
    This year’s Turkey Trot was Sunday. Approximately 220 participants took part in the 2.57-mile run or the 1.6-mile modified shorter course.
    The annual event, hosted by the CROP organization and the Atomic City Roadrunners, serves as a fundraiser for CROP and LA Cares, organizations that provide food assistance to needy persons in the area.
    Romero finished in a time of 15 minutes, 51 seconds, 12 seconds ahead of runner-up John Colman.
    The race started at Los Alamos Middle School and is run around North Mesa.
    Following the race, all participants were eligible for blind drawings for turkeys and pumpkin pies.

    Here are the top 25 finishers in the 2012 Turkey Trot:

    1. Ted Romero, 15:51; 2. Josh Colman, 16:03; 3. Duncan Fuehne, 17:32; 4. Marin Kelly, 17:32; 5. Wyatt Watson, 18:58; 6. Ben Rees, 19:20; 7. Andreas Runde, 19:20; 8. Vikki Saga, 19:23; 9. Paul Bradley, 19:57; 10. Zack Medin, 19:58.

    11. Roxanna Candia, 19:59; 12. Will Dearholt, 20:26; 13. Laura McClellan, 21:07; 14. Quinn Abfalterer, 21:35; 15. Kai Coblentz, 21:36; 16. Theodore Peterson, 22:01; 17. Carson Dickson, 22:22; 18. Chris Bernstein, 22:41; 19. Amy Regan, 22:43; 20. Mary Nea, 23:02;

  • State Notes 11-22-12

    Lobos’ Snell is co-Player of Week

    COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – Nevada junior guard Deonte Burton and New Mexico junior guard Tony Snell have been named Mountain West Men’s Basketball Co-Players of the Week for games through Nov. 18.
    This is the first MW career weekly accolade for both players.
    Snell helped New Mexico to a 3-0 record during the week as the Lobos posted victories over Davidson, Illinois-Chicago and George Mason — New Mexico also knocked off Connecticut in the Paradise Jam Finals Monday, but that game wasn’t considered for last week’s honors.
    Snell, a Riverside, Calif., native, opened the week with a then career-high 25 points, five rebounds and three assists in an 86-81 victory over the Wildcats in ESPN’s 24 Hours of College Hoops Marathon. Snell scored 11 of his points over the final 20 minutes as the Lobos rallied from a 16-point deficit to mark the program’s sixth-largest comeback overall and second-largest in the second half.
    He followed that performance with a combined 34 points, six assists and three steals in wins against the UIC Flames (66-59) and GMU Patriots (70-69) in the first two rounds of the Paradise Jam in St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, over the weekend.

  • Congress continues to get meaner

    SANTA FE – Washington, D.C. continues to get increasingly meaner with no end in sight. The recent national election changed nothing. The players are still the same and even if they had changed, little good would have resulted.
    A major change in attitude must take place. Moderates currently get “primaried” by their own parties for not being radical enough right or left. This polarization was not always the case.
    Fifty years ago our nation faced huge problems – communist fears, racial tensions and our first Catholic president. Many figured the Pope would move into the Lincoln bedroom and start running the government. But Washington remained basically civil. Moderate Democrats and Republicans managed to hammer out problems despite the crazies on the fringe.
    Now extremists are causing enough problems that Congress and the president are afraid to move. The causes likely are many. One of my favorite solutions is that members of Congress should get to know each other.
    Senators, except a few from neighboring states, still live in Washington. But House members usually don’t anymore. The thought of congressmen living in their offices was downright weird. In fact, it wasn’t allowed until recently.

  • Police beef up patrols

    Santa’s elves and Baby New Year won’t be the only ones out and about during the holidays; the Los Alamos Police Department will be out there, too.

    According to Lt. Scott Mills, the LAPD will boost their patrols now, through New Year’s Eve.

    “We’ll be putting extra officers in to increase our enforcement efforts for shoplifting, armed burglary, drunken driving and any other criminal activity that would victimize the citizens of Los Alamos during the holiday season,” Mills said.

    The strategy will include beefing up foot and bike patrols in the downtown area, as well as extra officers in different locations throughout the county to help with drunken driving enforcement.

    “Wherever officers think they are needed, they will be moving around to keep an eye on what’s going on,” Mills said.

    He said there’s also a lot residents can do help the police as well as protect themselves.

    “The predators seem to come out in force around this time of year,” Mills said.

    With that in mind, Mills said residents should be mindful of what they have lying around in plain sight in their parked cars.

  • Students pitch in for hurricane victims

    The images of the devastation caused by Hurricane Sandy hit Piñon Elementary School art teacher Stephanie Rittner hard.

    “I felt we couldn’t sit back and not do anything,” said Rittner, who is originally from New York. “As a community that has been through a natural disaster ourselves, I felt we could understand what they would need most. I was home with my daughter that day, so I emailed staff and they got on the ball.”

    Principal Jill Gonzales said that Rittner’s email became part of the conversation about what the school could do to help.

    Staff reached a consensus that a fund drive for the American Red Cross would be most useful. Gonzales was at a conference at that time, but encouraged them to organize it.

    Guidance Councilor Ellen Cort, secretary Wendy Hime and school clerk Kelly Hinojos were the organizing force behind the effort. They put out buckets for donations and cut out red, white and blue stars students could write their names on and post when they donated.

    Instructional assistant Jo Lakis created the artwork and graphics for a “thermometer” to record progress and an oversized ceremonial check to present to the Red Cross.

  • Manhattan Project website launches

    Stories about living in secret cities erased from the map and working on a top-secret project to make an atomic bomb are now available in video and transcripts on the Internet. “Voices of the Manhattan Project” is a new website with a variety of oral histories, which provide new insights into this history.

    The Atomic Heritage Foundation and the Los Alamos Historical Society are launching a new website on the 70th anniversary of Gen. Leslie Groves and J. Robert Oppenheimer’s search for a site for a research laboratory.

    Stirling Colgate was a senior at the Los Alamos Boys Ranch School when Oppenheimer visited there. According to his oral history, Colgate recognized the man in the porkpie hat right away and suspected what might be in store for the isolated mesa. Colgate thought Los Alamos was “a crazy place to do any war thing.” The rest is history.

    The collection of nearly 30 oral histories is just the beginning. AHF and LAHS hope to add some 200 from their collections and perhaps many more from organizations at the other Manhattan Project sites and elsewhere. Eventually, the site should provide a rich tapestry of people and perspectives on one of the most significant developments in modern history.

  • Chances slim for winter moisture

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — Weather forecasters and state and federal water managers on Monday painted a grim picture of the chances drought-stricken New Mexico has to make up any ground this winter.

    It’s early, but officials said the state is already starting off with half of the average snowpack for this time of year.

    “It’s not a promising start to the snow season and from most of what I’ve been seeing in terms of the models floating around, it’s not looking real optimistic as far as building snowpack through the winter either,” said Wayne Sleep, a hydrology technician with the Natural Resources Conservation Service.

    Drought has a firm lock right now on much of the Midwest and Western U.S. In New Mexico, drought-related pressures are stacking up though after two consecutive years of little rain or snow. Ranchers continue selling off their livestock, dairy and other agricultural operations have been forced out of business and those farmers who have weathered the drought so far are bracing for another year of pumping groundwater to irrigate their crops.

    With no meaningful winter moisture, Bureau of Reclamation hydrologist Raymond Abeyta said this will mark the lowest New Mexico reservoirs have ever been before an irrigation season.