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Today's News

  • Festival of the trees

    A variety of trees adorn the Betty Ehart Senior Center, in preparation for the Festival of Trees on Saturday. Bid sheets are placed near the trees, which allows the public to participate in a silent auction.

  • About Jack Killeen

    Jack Killeen’s work in security police forces in the U.S. Air Force and for the Department of Energy has taken him on intriguing assignments across the globe. Killeen served as chief of security forces for the U.S. Air Force in Turkey. He also served as director of security forces in Mildenhall, England where he provided leadership for all U.S. security forces in that country.

    In Germany, Killeen served as vice commander of Ramstein Air Base, where he led Ramstein’s anti-terrorism preparations during Desert Storm. As chief of security, Killeen also provided leadership for all U.S. military security for the USAF in Europe. Later, he supervised the protection of all U.S. nuclear weapons and security for Air Force aircraft in Europe.

  • Lab security chief pulls no punches

    Changing apartments every third month, traveling alternate routes each day and maintaining constant awareness of his surroundings in foreign countries was the way of life in the adrenaline-driven occupations John E. (Jack) Killeen has enjoyed in his career.  

    Killeen is the division leader of the Security Services Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory where he oversees its protective force, physical security and classified matter protection.

    On Friday, he gave a powerful Veterans’ Day speech to a crowd gathered at the Veterans of Foreign Wars Building on Trinity Drive.

  • WR committee moves forward

    Kent Budge addressed the White Rock Master Plan Implementation Committee (WRMPIC) as a private citizen Monday evening. Budge resigned the committee last week, after serving as chair since the committee formed in 2008.

    Budge focused on how the committee should move forward.

    “My concern is that when we originally got together, we had almost complete support from council. They always listened to us,” Budge said. “They didn’t always agree with us – I’d be worried if they did. But this was a whole new development.”

  • Police Beat 11-15-11

    Police Beat items are compiled from public information contained in Los Alamos Police Department records. Charges or citations listed in Police Beat do not imply innocence or guilt.
    Nov. 3

    11:51 a.m. – John Pacheco, 29, of Espanola was arrested on Trinity Drive on an outstanding warrant from Santa Fe County for a probation violation.     

    1:32 p.m. – Johnathan Lopez, 26, of Santa Cruz was arrested on Trinity Drive on an outstanding District Court Warrant for failure to appear.

    5:30 p.m. – A 27-year-old Los Alamos woman reported that her vehicle was burglarized while parked in the 3500 block of Trinity Dr. The estimated loss is unknown.

  • State deregulation woes

    Does New Mexico have too many regulations? Gov. Susana Martinez thinks so. She campaigned for smaller government.
    Eliminating regulations is one way of making government smaller. With fewer regulations, fewer inspectors are needed to monitor and enforce the regulations. And it is easier to conduct business with fewer rules to follow.
    So Gov. Martinez appointed a Small Business Friendly Task Force.
    The group has reported on ways to eliminate regulations and reduce waste. As one might guess, the Regulation and Licensing Department and the Construction Industries Division were two of the first targets.
    Gov. Martinez has heard plenty from the construction business about the onerous regulations they face.

  • Aggies, Lobos square off Wednesday

    Albuquerque will be the site of the biggest in-state rivalry’s first round Wednesday.
    The University of New Mexico Lobos men’s basketball team will take on the New Mexico State University Aggies Wednesday night.
    Game time is 8 p.m. in The Pit.
    The Lobos and Aggies will meet for the 207th time since the 1904-05 season. The Lobos lead the all-time series between the in-state rivals 112-94 but have been particularly successful against the Aggies in Albuquerque, where they have a 70-36 advantage.
    UNM and NMSU both won their season openers. UNM routed New Orleans Friday night at home, 92-40, while NMSU got past Northern Colorado on the road, 89-75.

  • Ortiz, Knapp named Players of the Year

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper football team dominated the postseason honor roll for District 2-4A.

    The All-District honorees were announced Monday. Los Alamos swept the three biggest honors, taking the offensive and defensive players of the year titles as well as the Coach of the Year.

    Garett Williams, only in his second season of leading the Hilltoppers, took the Coach of the Year honors for 2011 after guiding his team to a perfect 4-0 record in district competition, including knocking off two-time 2-4A champ Bernalillo and preseason district favorite Santa Fe in consecutive weeks.

  • Consumer spending still sputters

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Consumers are giving a modest lift to the economy. They spent more on autos, electronics and building supplies in October to boost retail sales for the fifth straight month.

    Stronger economic growth helped calm fears that the economy could slide back into a recession. Still, growth would need to be nearly double the third-quarter rate — consistently — to make a significant dent in unemployment.

    The gains provide an encouraging start for the October-December quarter just as separate reports show wholesale prices are flattening and U.S. shoppers are spending more at Wal-Mart, the world's largest retailer.

  • NM rattlesnakes used for cancer research trials

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Four Western diamondback rattlesnakes from Albuquerque's zoo are helping with the first clinical trials of venom as a cancer treatment in humans.

    Officials say the snakes have been sent to the Kentucky Reptile Zoo, one of four premier venom laboratories in the United States. The snakes' venom will be extracted and sent to France, where the clinical studies are under way.

    Snake venom contains hundreds of proteins that affect the human body in various ways.

    The proteins can be devastating when combined. In isolation, these proteins can be used to treat health issues from strokes and heart attacks to Alzheimer's disease and cancer.