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Today's News

  • Update 07-17-11

    CRC meeting
    Charter Review Committee will discuss the status of the Sheriff’s Office at a public meeting 5:30-7 p.m. Monday in council chambers.

    Missing pets?
    Residents whose pets may have gotten lost during the fire and evacuation are being asked to contact Animal Control through the Police Dispatch Center at 662-8222.

    Kiwanis talk
    Denise Lane and other volunteers will present their experience feeding thousands during the fire from noon-1 p.m., Tuesday at the Kiwanis Club at the Masonic Temple. 

    DPU meeting
    The Board of Public Utiliies will meet at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday in the DPU Conference Room at 170 Central Park Square.

    Meeting

  • Izraelevitz has record of community service

    New Los Alamos County Council member David Izraelevitz did not make the decision to put himself in contention to be appointed a county councilor lightly. In fact, Izraelevitz does not seem to take any decision lightly.

    When candidates for the council seat vacated when Jim Hall was appointed a state representative were asked to define their decision-making process, Izraelevitz responded, “I’d call it ‘Vulcan.’ I love data and I love logic.”

  • Fire protections outlined at TA-21

    Effective safety procedures in place at Los Alamos National Laboratory would have provided protections in the event that the Las Conchas fire had spread to the site of an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project located in TA-21 off DP Road.

    “Our procedures not only placed the waste excavation site, Materials Disposal Area B (MDA-B), into a safe posture so it was well protected during the fire, but also allowed us to resume work quickly,” said Project Director Al Chaloupka.

    The largest wildfire in New Mexico history forced the lab to close for more than a week. While firefighters battled the fire, Recovery Act project officials were making plans to restart excavation of MDA-B when it was safe to return to Los Alamos.

  • Bandelier bears brunt of blaze

    Out at Bandelier National Monument Friday, a large column of smoke rose from the southwest; which looked eerily similar to the beginning stages of the Los Conchas Fire, which started the afternoon of June 26.

    “It’s a backburn,” said Gary Kemp, the Bandelier Fire Management Officer.

    Firefighters from many different agencies continue to battle the record-setting blaze that has charred more than 150,000 acres and threatened the Los Alamos town site and the national laboratory two weeks ago.

    But almost lost in the chaos was what happened at Bandelier National Monument.

    On that Sunday afternoon in late June, Kemp was in his backyard in White Rock working on a project.

  • Hope where there is none

    For us in the County of Los Alamos, the view of smoke on the horizon gives us the sense of “not again.”  
    As a resident, I have experienced the La Mesa Fire, the Dome Fire, the Oso Fire, the Cerro Grande Fire and now the Las Conchas Fire.  
    But in addition, as an ecologist for 33 years, I have studied and measured the recovery of several of these fires, especially the La Mesa Fire.
    Out of the sense of hopelessness and grief of losing trees, I have found that watching the area recover from each of these fires has given me a sense of hope and awe at nature’s intricate balance and healing.  
    We sometimes see only the loss and not the miracle of rebirth.

  • Leakage is top problem

    “Our downtown is disappearing; local businesses are struggling; local residents are shopping elsewhere; non-residents are earning incomes here and taking that money out of town; there is too much ‘leakage.’”
    Sound familiar?  Welcome to Whittier, Calif., where the leakage problem was the central issue in the 2006 city council election campaigns.
    For the past years we have heard a constant drum-beat about “leakage,” the money earned in Los Alamos, which leaves Los Alamos.  Supposedly this is problem number one.  

  • Update 07-17-11

    City golf tourney registration open

    The Los Alamos City Championship golf tournament is scheduled for Saturday and Sunday.
    Registrations are being accepted at Los Alamos Golf Course through Wednesday.
    Any Los Alamos County resident, member of Los Alamos Golf Association or Los Alamos Women’s Golf Association is eligible to compete in the men’s, women’s or senior’s divisions. Players must be 16 or older.
    The tournament is a two-day, 36-hole, stroke-play event. Prizes will be awarded to the top finishers in the tournament flights.
    Price for participation is $100.
    For more information, call the LAGC at 662-8139.

    Hoops skills camp starts Monday

  • Fishing report 07-17-11

    Got a fish tale to tell, or some photographic evidence to back it up?

    Then let the Los Alamos Monitor know! Submit your fish stories and photos to lasports@lamonitor.com. Then check out lamonitor.com and see if you made the trophy board!

    Northwest

    Animas River: The flow is 1,780 cfs. The river is muddy but starting to come down from run-off.  No fishing report.

  • Moseley: Armstrong could do better

    The world’s most famous cycling race, the Tour de France, is in full gear, but, as usual, with the cloud of some high-profile doping scandals hanging overhead.
    Cycling has been dubbed by some as the “world’s dirtiest sport.” Local former professional rider Clay Moseley can appreciate why, but told the Monitor during an interview last month that he doesn’t think the moniker tells the whole story.
    Moseley was on the U.S. National team in the mid-1990s and rubbed shoulders with several of the top racers of the time, including seven-time Tour de France champ Lance Armstrong.

  • Burnout operations continue to generate smoke

    This from the U.S. Forest Service:

    Today, winds are expected to be from the southeast. This means communities to the north and northwest of the burnout will likely see heavy smoke today. This includes Ponderosa, Jemez Springs, Vallecitos de los Indios, Sierra de los Pinos, and La Cueva.

    The presence of smoke is a normal result of burnout operations and does not mean that the fire has escaped or that communities are in danger.

    Anyone with potential health issues related to smoke may call the New Mexico Nurse Advice Line at 1-877-725-2552.