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Today's News

  • Atomic Theatre Festival

    After many months of preparation,  Los Alamos and Santa Fe theater artists are presenting the first Atomic Theatre Festival in both Los Alamos and Santa Fe. 
    The festival was scheduled for July, but experienced a hiccup. The Las Conchas Fire occurred only weeks before the it was scheduled to open, so the fire forced postponement of Los Alamos performances until late August, following Santa Fe productions of plays written by Santa Fe playwrights: “Body Burden” by Dale Dunn and “Manhattan Glass” by Joey Chavez.

  • Alzheimer's is tough on caregivers

    No doubt about it: when someone you love is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or some other cause of dementia, it’s a crushing blow.
    Not only must you face the fact that your loved one has a degenerative and ultimately fatal condition, you also have to deal with a plethora of increasingly strange behaviors. Mother tells the same story 50 times a day and wanders the house all night, or dad compulsively loads and then unloads the dishwasher.
    Or your devoted spouse of 30 years is suddenly convinced you’re cheating on him with the next-door neighbor.

  • A new day of infamy

    The United States has endured and suffered through days of triumph and tragedy. Among the latter have been the stock market crashes of Sept. 28-29, 1929; Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor, Dec. 7, 1941; John Kennedy’s assassination on Nov. 22, 1963; and, of course, Sept. 11, 2001, which needs no elaboration.
    Joining that infamous collection will be Aug. 2, 2011.
    On that day, Congress passed and U.S. President Barack Obama signed into law legislation raising the debt ceiling and borrowing capacity of the United States while making about $1 trillion of spending cuts to its already swollen deficit-ridden budget.

  • Contact lost with hypersonic glider after launch

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — An unmanned hypersonic glider developed for U.S. defense research into super-fast global strike capability was launched atop a rocket early Thursday but contact was lost after the experimental craft began flying on its own, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency said.

    There was no immediate information on how much of the mission's goals were achieved.

    It was the second of two planned flights of a Falcon Hypersonic Technology Vehicle-2. Contact was also lost during the first mission.

    The small craft is part of a U.S. military initiative to develop technology to respond to threats at 20 times the speed of sound or greater, reaching any part of the globe in an hour.

  • Weekly unemployment aid applications decline to 395K

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of people seeking unemployment benefits fell last week below 400,000 for the first time in four months.

    Applications for unemployment aid dropped by 7,000 to a seasonally adjusted 395,000, the Labor Department said Thursday. Applications had been above 400,000 for the previous17 weeks.

    The four-week average, a less-volatile figure, fell to 405,000, its sixth straight decline. That suggests applications are decreasing over time.

    Applications fell in February to 375,000, a level that reflects healthy job growth. They soared to an eight-month high of 478,000 in late April, and have declined slowly since then.

  • Stocks resume sell-off; Dow finishes down 519--video extra

    NEW YORK (AP) — Back to reality and back down, Wall Street focused on the bleak landscape ahead for the economy Wednesday and wiped out its big gains from a day earlier — and then some.

    The Dow Jones industrial average closed down 519 points and has now lost more than 2,000 in less than three weeks. Swings of several hundred points in just minutes, accelerated by computerized trading, have become commonplace.

    This time, the selling was intensified by worries about in Europe. American bank stocks took hits because investors fretted that debt problems overseas might reach the United States.

  • Be There 08-10-11

    Today
    Dr. Lena Smith will give a presentation on “Emergeing trends in research and care for Alzheimer’s Disease” at 4 p.m. at the Bradbury Science Museum.

    Geekout game night will be from 5:30-8:30 p.m., upstairs in the Mesa Public Library.

    Tsankawi Evening Walk, 6:30 p.m. Reservations required, call 672-3861 ext. 517. No charge.

    Thursday
    The Los Alamos High School Football Gridiron Booster Club will have a Frito pie fundraiser from 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. at the Zia Credit Union.

  • LAPS retirees breakfast slated for Aug. 15

    A new school year is about to begin. With signs and labels all over town and special sections in the Los Alamos Monitor, the whole town is thinking about the start of a new school year.
    Not surprisingly, so are all those who have worked for and retired from the Los Alamos Public Schools.
    On Aug. 15, all retirees are invited to the Annual Retirees Breakfast at 9:30 a.m. at the Best Western Hilltop House. Invitations have been sent online and through the mail. RSVPs are due by Aug. 12. Contact Eileen Trujillo at 662-6533, etrueheo@gmail.com, or Karyl Ann Armbruster, 661-6605 or kaskaycayman@gmail.com.

  • YCC crews make a difference

    Ah, summer vacation, the time for lounging in the air-conditioned living room, sipping iced tea and playing computer games.
    But this scene isn’t what summer is like for 22 young men and women on The Family YMCA’s Youth Conservation Corps crew. Their days are filled with wilting heat, unquenchable thirst, dirt, heavy tools and plenty of sweat.
    Since June 1, the YCC has worked through hot, dry and smoky days to make needed improvements to the Los Alamos Trail Network. The physical and mental nature of the work has surprised some.
    “Building a trail is much harder than I expected, but it is also much more enjoyable than I thought it would be,” first-year crew member Maria Musgrave said.

  • State Briefs 08-10-11

    Jury finds man guilty in Texas teen’s death

    LAS CRUCES (AP) — A federal jury in Las Cruces has returned a guilty verdict against a man who kidnapped and killed a Texas teenager in 2005. The U.S. Attorney’s office says 32-year-old Larry Lujan faces the death penalty or life in prison without the chance of parole.
    Prosecutors said Lujan kidnapped 16-year-old Dana Joseph Grauke Jr., in San Antonio, Texas, and took him to Anthony, N.M., where Grauke was nearly beheaded with a meat cleaver and dumped in a south county irrigation canal.
    The jury heard closing statements Tuesday morning and deliberated for about 2 1/2 hours before returning the guilty verdict.