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Today's News

  • Large parts of Manhattan plunged into darkness

    NEW YORK (AP) — A superstorm that sent water rushing onto city streets has left a large swath of the lower part of Manhattan without power.

    Consolidated Edison spokesman Chris Olert said Monday evening that the power was out for most of Manhattan south of 26th Street.

    On the east side, the power outage extended from 29th Street south. There were some scattered areas that still had electricity.

    Olert said the damage stemmed from flooding and the probable loss of a transmission feeder.

    The power outage was separate from a planned power cut that Con Ed did in certain lower Manhattan neighborhoods to protect underwater systems from flood damage.

    Olert said there were 250,000 customers without power in Manhattan. A customer represents a single meter, so the number of people actually affected is likely higher.

  • Raw: Facade Falls Off Manhattan Building Front

    The facade has fallen off the front of a four-story Manhattan building, leaving apartments visible from the street. There are no reported injuries.

  • Raw: 14 Rescued, 2 Missing From Tall Ship Off NC

    A replica tall ship caught in Hurricane Sandy's wrath began taking on water, forcing the crew to abandon the boat Monday off the North Carolina coast. The Coast Guard rescued 14 crew members by helicopter, but two people were still missing.

  • Girls are No. 2, boys No. 3 in 4A soccer brackets

    Both the Los Alamos Hilltopper boys and girls soccer teams will have some down time before they get rolling in the Class 4A tournaments.
    Los Alamos’ girls picked up the No. 2 seed in the upcoming girls soccer playoffs while Los Alamos’ boys earned the No. 3 seed in the 4A boys tournament. By virtue of their seeds, the Hilltoppers both get a bye into the quarterfinal round, which is scheduled for Nov. 8 in Albuquerque.
    The Hilltopper girls will take on either Piedra Vista or Miyamura in the quarterfinals, while the Hilltopper boys will have either Santa Teresa or Los Lunas.
    There were few major surprises in either the 4A boys and girls playoff brackets this year.
    “I expected it,” Los Alamos boys head coach Evan Gartz said of his team’s top-four seed. “I wasn’t expecting Chaparral to get the No. 2 spot, but I didn’t expect to be in front of Farmington, either. Other than that, it was pretty close to what I thought it was going to be.”
    Both the Albuquerque Academy Charger teams grabbed the No. 1 seeds in the two brackets.

  • Raw: Hurricane Sandy Leaves Travelers Stranded

    Hurricane Sandy grounded thousands of flights from Atlanta to San Francisco Monday. The massive storm threatens to bring a near halt to air travel for at least two days in a key region for both domestic and international flights.

  • Raw: Amateur Video of Sandy Showing Up
  • Sign goes up on new brewpub

    Workers hoisted the sign at the new Pajarito Brewpub and Grill early Monday afternoon. The new eatery, located in the Mari-Mac shopping center, has not announced an opening date.

  • Hurricane Sandy grounds thousands of flights

    NEW YORK (AP) — Hurricane Sandy grounded thousands of flights in the U.S. northeast Monday and upended travel plans across the globe, stranding passengers from Hong Kong to Europe. The massive storm threatens to bring a near halt to air travel for at least two days in a key region for both domestic and international flights.

    Major carriers such as American Airlines, United and Delta cancelled all flights into and out of three area airports in New York, the nation's busiest airspace. According to the flight-tracking service FlightAware, nearly 10,000 flights had been canceled for Monday and Tuesday, almost all related to the storm.

    Delays rippled across the U.S., affecting travelers in cities such as San Francisco to Chicago. Disruptions spread to Europe and Asia, where airlines canceled or delayed flights to New York and Washington from cities that are major travel hubs including London, Paris, Tokyo and Hong Kong.

    About one-quarter of all U.S. flights travel in or out of New York airports each day. So cancellations here can dramatically impact travel in other cities.

  • 10 things to know for Monday

    Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and stories that will be talked about on today:

    1. SUPERSTORM NEARS EAST COAST

    Sandy is expected to come ashore Monday night in New Jersey bringing high winds, soaking rain and a surging wall of water up to 11 feet tall.

    2. AIR TRAFFIC COMES TO A NEAR HALT AS NORTHEAST GEARS FOR SANDY

    Thousands of flight cancellations mean passengers are stranded from Hong Kong to Europe.

    3. WHAT THE KEY WAS TO THE GIANTS' SERIES SWEEP

    Some may point to MVP Pablo Sandoval's three homers in Game 1 while others say the clincher was Marco Scutaro's 10th inning hit in Game 4.

    4. CAMPAIGN'S LAST WEEK TURNS INTO SCHEDULING NIGHTMARE

  • East Coast grinds to a halt as superstorm nears

    NEW YORK (AP) — Hurricane Sandy bore down on the Eastern Seaboard's largest cities Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds, soaking rain and a surging wall of water up to 11 feet tall.

    Sandy strengthened before dawn and stayed on a predicted path toward Washington, Baltimore, Philadelphia and New York — putting it on a collision course with two other weather systems that would create a superstorm with the potential for havoc over 800 miles from the East Coast to the Great Lakes. About 2 to 3 feet of snow were even forecast for mountainous parts of West Virginia.

    The tempest could endanger up to 50 million people for days.

    Many workers planned to stay home Monday as subways, buses and trains shut down across the region under the threat of flooding that could inundate tracks and tunnels. Airports also closed, and authorities warned that the time for evacuation was running out or already past. Utilities brought in extra crews, anticipating widespread power failures.