.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Crooks target businesses

    In an age when many products sell in cyberspace and the buyer and seller never meet, creative crooks are finding new ways to defraud businesses — especially web-based businesses and individuals selling items through online platforms.
    One scheme involves counterfeit versions of a time-honored currency – the cashier’s check.
    Scammers commit cashier’s check fraud using an authentic-looking cashier’s check to buy a product. The seller deposits the check and her account is charged for the amount when the check bounces back to the bank as a fake.
    Another version of this scam involves checks written for more than the sales price.
    The “buyer” typically asks the seller to remit the excess funds via a wire transfer or Western Union, offering a superficially plausible reason for the overpayment. When the phony check bounces, the seller is liable for the entire amount.
    While this scam usually targets individuals, businesses can also fall prey. To protect themselves, businesses should accept only easily verifiable payment methods.
    Scams directed at businesses often exploit new technology to commit classic crimes.

  • Understanding 401(k) fees

    If you’re like many Americans – 71 percent, according to an AARP survey – you might be under the impression that your 401(k) plan administrator doesn’t charge you anything to maintain your account. You’d be wrong.
    In fact, these companies typically charge fees equivalent to 0.5 to 2 percent of your account balance each year – sometimes as high as 5 percent. In addition to ongoing tariffs for managing your investment options, plan administrators often deduct numerous other fees from individuals’ accounts, including charges for administrative costs, sales commissions, advertising, insurance, and trading expenses.
    Perhaps equally disturbing is that many employers – which have a fiduciary responsibility to ensure the retirement plans they sponsor have reasonable fees and expenses – often don’t know what fees their employees are being charged either.
    Over time, out-of-control fees can take a serious toll. The Department of Labor estimates that paying just 1 percent in extraneous fees each year could reduce your account balance by 28 percent during an average working career.

  • Perkins' family asks for privacy

    KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Breaking their silence for the first time, the family of the woman shot and killed by Kansas City Chiefs linebacker Jovan Belcher said Monday their "hearts are truly broken" and asked for privacy while they grieve the loss of two loved ones.

     

    Belcher shot and killed his 22-year-old girlfriend, Kasandra Perkins, at their Kansas City home Saturday before driving to Arrowhead Stadium, where Belcher committed suicide in the practice facility's parking lot, police said. The couple had a 3-month-old daughter, Zoey.

     

    "Our hearts are truly broken for Kasi was a beloved daughter, granddaughter, sister, mother, cousin and friend," the family said in an emailed statement. The family also asked that the media "respect our privacy during this difficult time."

     

    "Please keep us in your hearts and prayers as well as the Belcher family," the statement said.

     

    Kansas City police Sgt. Marisa Barnes said Monday that authorities hope to deliver an investigative report to prosecutors on Tuesday.

     

    "They're moving it along just like any other case. There's a formal process it has to go through," she said.

     

  • Sports Update 12-04-12

    Lobos move up in men’s hoops polls

    The University of New Mexico Lobos made a big jump in this week’s Associated Press men’s basketball poll.
    The Lobos, who won a pair of games this week to improve to 8-0 on the season, elevated seven spots in the AP poll to No. 18. Only Illinois (8-0) made a bigger leap in the poll — from No. 22 to No. 13 — of college hoops sportswriters from around the nation.
    UNM garnered 402 points in the AP poll. The team is one spot behind San Diego State, which moved up six places this week, from No. 23 to No. 17.
    Indiana (8-0) kept the top spot in the AP poll and Duke (8-0) is still the No. 2-ranked team in the nation. The teams are 1-2 in the USA Today coaches poll as well.
    In the USA Today poll, the Lobos finished at No. 20, up three spots from last week. San Diego State finished 15th in that poll. UNLV, which UNM will host in its first Mountain West game Jan. 9, is also ranked in the top 20.

    Triatomics’ Christmas Light Runs continue through Dec. 20

    The Los Alamos Triatomics multi-sport club continues its 2012 Christmas Light Runs series Wednesday.
    The runs will go through various Los Alamos neighborhoods during the holiday season and vary in length from 2.3 miles to 6.5 miles.

  • LA swim results from Barney Relays

    Here are Los Alamos’ results from Saturday’s Peter B. Barney Relays:

    Girls

    Team scores

    1. Albuquerque Academy, 122; 2. Rio Rancho, 90; 3. Los Alamos, 66; 4. Cleveland, 54; 5. St. Pius X, 46; 6. Sandia Prep, 44; 7. Hope Christian, 28; 8. Socorro, 14.

    Mixed 400 medley relay

    2. Los Alamos (Maria Venneri, Max Reidys, Sam Harris, Ashlynn Bennett), 4:12.54.

    200 freestyle relay

    2. Los Alamos (Sydney Schoonover, Kaitlin Bennett, Izzy Runde, Anna Wermer), 1:48.70.

    200 breaststroke relay

    6. Los Alamos (Simona Martin, Sydney Trujillo, Caemlyn Tripp, Tracee Abeita), 2:56.02.

    200 backstroke relay

    5. Los Alamos (Anna Wermer, Simona Martin, Safiya Bahar, Caemlyn Tripp), 2:24.68.

    400 IM relay

    2. Los Alamos (Maria Venneri, Sydney Schoonover, Izzy Runde, Ashlynn Bennett), 4:33.55.

    200 butterfly relay

    4. Los Alamos (Anna Wermer, Izzy Runde, Kaitlin Bennett, Safiya Bahar), 2:09.70.

    200 medley relay

    2. Los Alamos (Maria Venneri, Kaitlin Bennett, Sydney Schoonover, Ashlynn Bennett), 2:02.92.

    Mixed 400 freestyle relay

  • Police: Girl May Die if Not Returned to Hospital

    A young girl with leukemia and a heart catheter could die in a matter of days if she is not brought back to an Arizona hospital after her parents inexplicably took her out of the facility last week, authorities said Monday.

  • Nearly $500M available for capital projects in NM

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — State economists estimate nearly $500 million is available to finance capital improvement projects across New Mexico.

    The Legislative Finance Committee was told Monday the state can issue bonds backed by severance taxes to provide about $222 million for new capital projects, which will be determined by the Legislature and Gov. Susana Martinez next year when lawmakers meet in a 60-day legislative session.

    State law earmarks about $175 million in bond financing for public school improvements and $33 million must go for water projects.

    Nearly $34 million of available financing must be used for tribal infrastructure and capital improvements in colonias, which are poor communities usually near the border with Mexico.

    The governor vetoed some capital projects earlier this year, complaining that lawmakers don't focus enough on statewide priorities.

  • Today in History for December 4th
  • Millions of Pounds of Explosives Found in La.

    State police resumed moving millions of pounds of explosives Monday that had been haphazardly stashed in warehouses in Louisiana, prompting hundreds to evacuate from harm's way in case any of it exploded.

  • CDC says US flu season starts early, could be bad

    NEW YORK (AP) — Flu season in the U.S. is off to its earliest start in nearly a decade — and it could be a bad one.

    Health officials on Monday said suspected flu cases have jumped in five Southern states, and the primary strain circulating tends to make people sicker than other types. It is particularly hard on the elderly.

    "It looks like it's shaping up to be a bad flu season, but only time will tell," said Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    The good news is that the nation seems fairly well prepared, Frieden said. More than a third of Americans have been vaccinated, and the vaccine formulated for this year is well-matched to the strains of the virus seen so far, CDC officials said.

    Higher-than-normal reports of flu have come in from Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee and Texas. An uptick like this usually doesn't happen until after Christmas. Flu-related hospitalizations are also rising earlier than usual, and there have already been two deaths in children.