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Today's News

  • Tech company opens

    Brian Kelley, holding his daughter Athena, officially cut the ribbon on Azazo Technologies, “a computer company that can fix any computer or network problem, large or small.” The company also will be selling used computer equipment. Call 672-5105 for more information.
    Helping Kelley open his new business are, left to right, Kevin Holsapple, executive director of the Los Alamos Commerce and Development Corporation, employee Heather Eichwald, Katy Korkos, member services coordinator at the Commerce and Development Corporation and business advisor Katie Staver.
    Azazo is located at 1907 Central Ave., Suite 207. The email is thepandagiant@live.com.

  • Update 10-11-12

    Council forum

    The Los Alamos Chamber of Commerce and the Los Alamos Monitor will host a county council candidate forum at 6 p.m. Oct. 18 at UNM-LA Building 5 Lecture Hall. The forum will focus on business and economic development issues facing LA. Doors open at 5:30 p.m.

    Parks and Rec

    The Parks and Recreation Board will meet at 5:30 p.m. Thursday at the Larry R. Walkup Aquatic Center. The board meets monthly. More information can be obtained by calling 662-8173.

    CRC committee

    Members of Charter Review Committee will be available at the Farmer’s Market to answer questions.  Join them between 9:30-11:30 a.m. Committee members plan to meet with voters at the Farmer’s Market every Thursday between now and the day of the election.

    County Council

    The Los Alamos County Council will meet at 7 p.m. Oct. 16 for a work session at the White Rock Fire Station No. 3.

    BPU meeting

    The Board of Public Utilities will hold its regular monthly meeting at 5:30 p.m. Oct. 17 at the DPU Conference Room at 170 Central Park Square.

  • 'Pink Skies' to be aired at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is partnering on with Los Alamos Public Schools, Northern New Mexico College and schools in Pojoaque and Española during Breast Cancer Awareness month in October.
    It’s called “Pink Skies,” a documentary about the empowerment of women and overcoming obstacles as athletes and human beings. The film follows Ruth, a breast cancer survivor, as she hopes to join a team of nearly 200 women from 31 countries to create a world record all Women’s Skydiving Formation. The team also has a goal to raise nearly $1 million for breast cancer research and prevention.
    The award-winning documentary is being screened for lab employees Oct. 16 at LANL, but it’s also being screened for the community.
    In addition to the screening at LANL, “Pink Skies” will be screened four times in Española and Los Alamos.
    • 12:45-2:30 p.m., Oct. 15, Nick Salazar Center for the Performing Arts, Northern New Mexico College; for junior and senior high students from Española, Pojoaque and McCurdy.
    • 6:30 p.m., Oct. 15, Nick Salazar Center for the Performing Arts, Northern New Mexico College; open to the public.
    • 12:15-2:15 p.m., Oct. 16, Duane Smith Auditorium, Los Alamos High School; junior and senior students.

  • Online forum looks to open government

    Los Alamos residents often complain that they are unaware of what the county is doing or that they do not have time to attend meetings or send emails about issues that concern them. The county has just launched another initiative that may make it easier for citizens to stay informed and involved.
    Open Forum is an online tool for citizen participation developed and moderated by Peak Democracy, a nonpartisan company whose mission is to broaden civic engagement and build public trust in government. The county’s cost for a yearly subscription and full support is $2,700.
    “This is in response to council’s desire to find additional ways to conduct public outreach with citizens and try to find different venues for people to have more 24/7 access to county government, without necessarily attending another public meeting or having to go to someone’s office to look at a particular document,” said Los Alamos County Public Information Officer Julie Habiger.
    Open Forum provides tools for citizen engagement. The county posts information about a project or an upcoming council issue on the site. Citizens can read a basic introduction and decide if they want to learn more by following links to power point presentations or additional information.

  • Properties Generate Revenue for District

    Entrepreneurs looking for the ideal place to locate their business, need to look no further than the Los Alamos Public Schools. Some might not know the LAPS has a number of properties around town that are suitable for residents who might be looking to open a business.

    Currently the Los Alamos Public School District has at least two properties for lease, The “L” section of a building at 3540 Orange St. and two suites, “S” and “T” at 2101 Trinity Dr. And though they aren’t giving the properties away for free, the leases can be pretty reasonable. According to the district’s assets manager, Joan Ahlers, the process is pretty straightforward.

    “If somebody wants to lease from the school district, whether it’s vacant land or actual office space, they come through my office,” she said. “We then do a needs analysis and find out what may work for them.”

    After a price is negotiated, a three-step approval process then begins. First, the lease has to be approved by either the Public Education Department or the State Board of Finance. From there, the school board then approves the lease, before it moves on to planning and zoning at the county.

  • NMCF report digs deep on settlement

    The Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Association, Los Alamos National Laboratory and the New Mexico Environment Department are in the midst of negotiating the termination of the 2007 Settlement Agreement and Stipulated Final Order (Chromium Settlement).

    Officials, however, have refused comment on the progress of the negotiations.

    Here is a little background:

    In 2007, NMED reached a settlement with LANL over the lab’s failure to report chromium contamination in a monitoring well. The department said the lab paid a $251,870 penalty as part of the settlement.

    “This enforcement action should remind the operators of LANL that they have a duty to report significant environmental contamination to the state and residents promptly,” Environment Secretary Ron Curry said at the time. “Chromium contamination is a serious issue.”

    The department had accused the lab’s operators, Los Alamos National Security LLC and the U.S. Department of Energy, of violating LANL’s hazardous waste permit and a 2005 consent order that governs environmental cleanup activities by failing to report increases of chromium in a groundwater monitoring well in 2004.

  • McMillan to speak at MOWW meeting

    The Major General Franklin E. Miles Chapter 229 of the Military Order of World Wars in Los Alamos announces that Janet McMillan (Charles) will present a talk at the Oct. 16 MOWW Chapter 229 Dinner meeting.  
    The meeting will be at the Hilltop House, third floor and will begin with a social period at 6 p.m., followed by a brief business meeting and dinner at 6:25 p.m.
    McMillan’s presentation will begin at about 7:15 p.m. The dinner entrée is vegetarian crepe with asparagus tips, salad and roll for $23 per person.
    The Military Order of the World Wars dinner meetings are open to the general public for the dinner and program, or the program only at no cost. Please note that a dinner reservation made is a commitment to the chapter to pay for the reserved dinner(s).
    RSVP for the dinner is needed by Sunday. Call Lt. Col. Gregg Giesler, AUS retired, chapter commander, at 662-5574 or send email to g.giesler@computer.org; or Lt. Col. Norman G. Wilson, USAF retired, chapter adjutant at 662-9544 or email Nrmwil5@cs.com.
    Act of Congress chartered the Military Order of the World Wars in 1919 as a national patriotic organization.

  • Be There 10-11-12

    Today
    The United Blood Services New Mexico will host a community blood drive from 11 a.m.-7 p.m. at First Baptist Church, 2200 Diamond Dr.

    The Sierrans will host a highway clean-up event along their stretch of N.M. 4 at the Valles Caldera. Meet at Ponderosa Campground at 5 p.m. to carpool. It should take no more than two hours. Bring work gloves and water. Trash bags will be provided. For more information, contact Dave Gemeinhart, 672-6267.

    Join the Parent Raising Teen Club from 6-7:30 p.m. at the Unitarian Church, 1738 N. Sage Loop. Share your worries and find like-minded parents that can offer support. The group will meet each Thursday evening through Nov. 29. For more information, call Elizabeth Grant at 660-5796.

    Poetry gatherings at 6:30 p.m. in the upstairs rotunda of Mesa Public Library.

    The Los Alamos Genealogical Association will hold its monthly meeting at 7 p.m. in room three of the Mesa Public Library. The program will be a presentation by Dr. William Litchman, a professional genealogist from Albuquerque, titled, “Church Records and Their Use in Genealogical Research.” The public is invited.

  • Learn about accidents in mountaineering

    Jed Williamson knows how people get in trouble in the mountains. He has been the chair of the Safety Advisory Council and the editor of the American Alpine Club’s annual report, Accidents in North American Mountaineering, since 1974.  
    At 7:30 p.m. Oct. 17 at Fuller Lodge, Williamson will present an overview of his knowledge of moving through the mountains with other people, what works and what goes wrong.
    His presentation will include detailed analysis of the many factors that add up to an accident, not just weather and terrain, but human fallibility in behaviors and judgment.
    Through his knowledge, he will teach the facts and give some perspective on how to take risks and maximize the possibility of safe passage at the same time. His talk will cover trends and patterns in mountaineering and wilderness accidents and analysis of some classic accidents.
    Williamson has been a practitioner and consultant in education and outdoor pursuits, including more than 60 safety and quality reviews and accident investigations and 16 accreditation reviews.
    He was a member of the Board of the American Alpine Club from 1974 to 1998 and elected as an honorary member in 2007.

  • Needlework display at Mesa Public Library

    The display case at Mesa Public Library will feature embroidered artwork stitched by members of the Pajarito Chapter of the Embroiderers’ Guild of America, through Oct. 26. The EGA is a national educational organization dedicated to promoting and preserving needle arts. There are a number of different types of needlework in the display.
    The local chapter meets on the first Monday of the month at 7 p.m. in Gibson Fellowship Hall of Bethlehem Lutheran Church in Los Alamos. Each meeting features a program on a stitching technique or project. During the past year the group has explored stump work (three-dimensional embroidery), chicken scratch or gingham embroidery, crazy quilting, New Mexican colcha embroidery and Kumihimo (Japanese braiding.)
    Between 10 a.m. and noon Oct. 20, members of Pajarito Chapter will be in the lobby of Mesa Public Library to demonstrate various embroidery techniques. Watch the stitchers at work. They’ll explain the various techniques and answer questions. For more information call Marilyn at 672-9404.