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Today's News

  • Today in History for October 12th
  • Mailing a letter will cost another penny next year

    WASHINGTON (AP) — It'll cost another penny to mail a letter next year.

    The cash-strapped U.S. Postal Service said Thursday that it will raise postage rates on Jan. 27, including a 1-cent increase in the cost of first-class mail to 46 cents.

    It also will introduce a new global "forever" stamp, allowing customers to mail first-class letters anywhere in the world for one set price of $1.10. Currently, the prices vary depending on the international destination, with letters to Canada and Mexico costing 85 cents.

    Under the law, the post office cannot raise stamp prices more than the rate of inflation, or 2.6 percent, unless it gets special permission. The post office, which expects to lose a record $15 billion this year, has asked Congress to give it new authority to raise prices by 5 cents, but lawmakers have failed to act.

    The mail agency also will increase rates on its shipping services, such as priority mail, by an average of 4 percent.

  • Resident: Prostitution Arrest Rocks Maine Town

    People in the upscale Maine beach town of Kennebunk are waiting anxiously as police prepare to release the names of clients of Zumba instructor Alexis Wright who also allegedly worked as a prostitute.

     

     

  • Putting the public first when it comes to public information

    Some years ago, I was present at a Legislative Finance Committee meeting in Silver City. Legislative committees hold some meetings each year outside Santa Fe, to help make government more accessible to citizens around the state.
    Attending the meeting were committee staff plus the usual suspects, state officials and lobbyists. Following committees around the state was part of their job.
     They could have been back in Santa Fe for all the difference the location made. Not a soul from the local community was in attendance, until a dozen or so senior citizens walked in, chaperoned by a staff member of their retirement home.
    The secretary of the Department of Finance and Administration was testifying. As is customary, he was facing the committee, had his back to the audience, and was talking in technical language about technical matters.
     To these visitors, he could have been speaking Klingon. The committee chair never acknowledged the visitors either or changed procedure in any way to accommodate them. They sat in bewildered silence.
    Various state boards and commissions also tramp around the state with their professional followers in tow. Local residents have a chance to participate, or at least watch and say howdy, but rarely do.

  • Sports Update 10-11-12

    Pickleball group playing at YMCA

    The Family YMCA of Los Alamos is hosting an afternoon pickleball group at its gymnasium.
    The pickleball group meets Tuesdays and Thursdays at the YMCA.
    More information on the group is available by calling the YMCA at 662-3100.

    Girls soccer goes pink Saturday

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper girls soccer team will wear pink Saturday and will be collecting loose change to help support breast cancer research.
    Los Alamos will play Bernalillo at 11 a.m.

     

  • Toppers, Spartans to face off Friday

    It’s do-or-die time in District 2-4A.
    And the Los Alamos Hilltopper football team will take its first step toward doing or dying Friday night.
    Los Alamos will take on the Bernalillo Spartans in the district opener for both schools. That contest is slated for 7 p.m. at Spartan Field.
    Last week, Los Alamos wrapped up its nondistrict season with a 29-25 victory at Albuquerque Academy, a game which Los Alamos trailed 11-8 at halftime but rallied to win, the clincher coming on a 42-yard touchdown strike from Brice Van Etten to Xavier Dennison.
    The Hilltoppers are seeking a second straight District 2-4A title, but so far this season, no 2-4A team has established itself as a clear frontrunner. The Hilltoppers probably have the upper hand among the three teams with the best shot to vie for the title.
    Los Alamos will have back-to-back contests with the Spartans and the Santa Fe Demons. A pair of wins will go a long way to clinching a title.
    “Our guys are feeling good,” said Hilltopper head coach Garett Williams, who led them to the 2011 district crown. “We’re coming off a win, but it’s a new season. We’re going into district. The guys had a great week of practice and we’re ready to go.”

  • LA rallies to top Española Valley

    Barring a runaway victory in the fourth set by the Los Alamos Hilltoppers, the difference between the Hilltoppers and the Española Valley Sundevils in their match Wednesday night was zero points.
    Los Alamos, trying to avoid falling into a big early hole in the District 2-4A volleyball race, hosted Española Valley at Griffith Gymnasium. Española Valley, which came out victorious in its first two district outings, had a chance to take a commanding 2-game lead with a win.
    The Sundevils looked to be on their way after outlasting the Hilltoppers in a grueling, emotional third set, but following that set, which both teams had and lost chances to put away, the Hilltoppers rallied to take the final two sets.
    In the fourth set, Los Alamos libero Danielle Ortiz reeled off eight straight points to start, giving her team a big advantage. The momentum from the fourth set carried Los Alamos through a tough fifth set to take a 24-26, 25-23, 28-30, 25-8, 15-13 victory.
    Like in many of their recent outings, the Hilltoppers had trouble getting things going against the Sundevils early.
    “It was shaky,” said Ortiz. “We were tied at 1-1 and that third game was really tight. We battled it out, but coming down to the wire it was anyone’s game.”

  • Doggy Daycare opens

    Rover I Doggy Day Care opened its doors last week at 212 DP Road, under the ownership of Trish Lind.

     

  • LAMC hosts Teddy Bear Clinic Friday

    The Los Alamos Medical Center will host a Teddy Bear Clinic Friday morning.
    Approximately 350 kindergartners, their teachers and parent chaperones will have the opportunity to tour most areas of the hospital in order to learn about the facility and its departments, all while gaining a comfort level within a hospital setting.
    With the help of Care Flight and Los Alamos police and fire departments the students will also have the opportunity to tour helicopters, police cars and ambulances.
    “We are very pleased to have the opportunity to create an educational experience that our children will never forget” said hospital CEO Feliciano Jiron.
    “As a community organization, we believe that Los Alamos Medical Center can provide a wonderful experience for the children of our community as they develop a strong understanding of the importance healthcare plays in our day to day lives. The entire organization is very excited and cannot wait for the kids walk through our door.”
    “We have invited every kindergarten class in Los Alamos to take part in this wonderful program” said event coordinator Johanna Jiron.

  • LA County forms advisory committee

    Residents, business owners and representatives interested in Los Alamos County’s recently adopted arts and culture district (aka Creative District) are invited to apply to join the Creative District Advisory Committee forming this month.  Letters of interest are due to the county by 5 p.m. Oct. 16. 
     The county administrator is seeking citizen volunteers to join representatives of cultural and business assets operating within the adopted boundary of the Creative District to provide guidance and advice to council and staff regarding the county’s role in the implementation of the Creative District Master Plan — a plan designed for the purpose of achieving economic revitalization of downtown Los Alamos through the preservation, support and promotion of the community’s arts, culture and science and technology assets and attractions.
     Committee member selection will be based on the following criteria:
    • Have a high interest in the county’s arts and culture organizations, businesses and attractions;
    • Represent a wide range of interests and activities (residents or commercial/business owners);
    • Have actively served with local community groups or organizations;
    • Have a fair working knowledge of local government and its services; and