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Today's News

  • Billboard Top 10 Singles 07-14-11

    1.  Party Rock Anthem, LMFAO featuring Lauren Bennett and GoonRock

    2.  Give Me Everything, Pitbull featuring Ne-Yo, AfroJack and Nayer

    3. Rolling in the Deep, Adele

    4. Last Friday Night (T.G.I.F.)

    5. Super Bass, Nicki Minaj

    6.   The Edge of Glory, Lady Gaga

    7.  E.T., Katy Perry featuring Kanye West
    8. How to Love, Lil Wayne
    9.  Good Life, OneRepublic
    10. Tonight Tonight, Hot Chelle Rae

  • This week on PAC-8, July 15-21

    THIS WEEK ON PAC-8
    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board.

    Friday, July 15, 2011
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! – LIVE!
    10:00 AM Democracy Now!
    11:00 AM County Council Meeting Replay (7-12-11)
    03:00 PM Start up Ceremony of the MW
        Turbine at the Abiquiu Hydroelctric Facility
    04:00 PM The House of Yahwah
    05:00 PM Democracy Now!
    06:00 PM Los Alamos Historical Society -“World War II: One Soldier’s Story”
    07:30 PM Spirituality Today
    08:00 PM Clear Heart, Pure Mind
    09:00 PM UCTV

    Saturday, July 16, 2011
    5:00 UCTV

  • Opera seeks volunteers

    Those who love opera might now have a way to spend their summer evenings.
    The Santa Fe Opera Shop needs volunteers to serve as sales assistants before and during intermission at evening performances.
    Volunteers help with customer service, sales, make sure that Opera Shop merchandise is displayed and plentiful and other duties as necessary.  
    As an appreciation, volunteers may attend certain dress rehearsals; they also receive parking spaces and generous discounts on selected Opera Shop merchandise.
    July performances are on Wednesday, Friday and Saturday evenings.  Beginning Aug. 1 until the end of the season on Aug. 27, performances are every night of the week.
    The Opera Shop opens 90 minutes before each performance.  

  • Netflix raises rates, irks subscriber

    SAN FRANCISCO — Netflix has provoked the ire of some of its 23 million subscribers by raising its prices by as much as 60 percent for those who want to rent DVDs by mail and watch video on the Internet.
    The company is separating the two options so that subscribers who want both will have to buy separate plans totaling at least $16 per month. Netflix Inc. had been bundling both options in a single package, available for as low as $10 per month.
    New subscribers will have to pay the new prices immediately. The changes take effect Sept. 1 for Netflix’s current customers.

  • 'Transformers' stay in shape

    LOS ANGELES — “Transformers: Dark of the Moon” now rules this year’s box office as the blockbuster sequel became 2011’s top domestic hit with $261 million, according to studio estimates Sunday.
    Paramount Pictures’ sci-fi smash starring Shia LaBeouf remained No. 1 in its second weekend with $47 million and shot past “The Hangover Part II” to first-place on the domestic chart.
    Debuting in second place with $28.1 million domestically was the Warner Bros. comedy “Horrible Bosses,” featuring Jason Bateman, Charlie Day and Jason Sudeikis as bumblers plotting against their nasty supervisors.

  • Best Sellers 07-14-11

    The Los Alamos Monitor has the inside scoop on what locals are reading. Otowi Station issued a current list of  popular books for Los Alamos readers.

  • 'Faust': The choice between good and evil

    The 2011 Santa Fe Opera season is underway, and in addition to providing a much-needed distraction from recent fire-related concerns, it offers a fantastic way to experience the amazing art of live performance — one sure to captivate from start to finish.
    Charles Gounod’s “Faust” is the perfect example of a classic struggle between good and evil, with the devil himself controlling much of the stage.
    “Faust” opens with conductor Frédéric Chaslin leading the overture. The music is slow, yet riveting as it sets the tone and precedes the dramatic entrance of Faust (Bryan Hymel) onto a simple stage featuring bookcases and a desk.

  • Hidden history: Sawyer's Road meets N.M. 4

    N.M. 4 is a picturesque journey through pine forests, high desert mesas and quaint mountain towns.  From the junction of Highway 501, N.M. 4 gently ascends the slopes above Water Canyon before winding gently into the Jemez Mountains. This highway travels effortlessly through the forests to many popular outdoor destinations and is even used as an alternative route to Albuquerque. However, this popular scenic byway began as a dusty wagon trail carved out of the rocks with picks by local settlers nearly 100 years ago.  

    Historical Origins  

  • Don't let courts redistrict

    State legislators assume they’ll be back at the  Roundhouse in a couple of months for a special session devoted to redistricting New Mexico’s three U.S. House seats, along with the five seats that comprise the Public Regulation Commission and, of course, the legislature itself.
    Their target date for this late-summer conclave is Sept. 12, after Labor Day when the tourist season has waned, and hotels, motels and other accommodations will be available during their Santa Fe sojourn.
    This will be Gov. Susana Martinez’s first special session, and it is she who will set the date for the legislature to convene.
    Nor has she indicated whether that mid-September date suits her fancy.

  • Blackened land and red ink

    Clearing out old magazines last week, I came across a National Geographic (May 2010) story summarizing simply and graphically how, exactly, the 230-square-mile blast zone around Mount St. Helens is recovering.
    If life can return on this most damaged of lands, it’s encouraging for us.
    Ecologists expected most growth to begin on the margins.
    Instead, it’s recovering from the inside out. Surviving pocket gophers pushed soil to the surface, where wind-blown seeds landed and took root; perennials poked through the ash, shrubs resprouted.
    Other burrowing creatures, like toads and mice, emerged. As new plants appeared, insects returned; elk hooves broke up the crust and mixed ash and soil. It will take 50 years for a forest to reappear.