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Today's News

  • The telephone is ringing

    When out enjoying a leisurely lunch, incessant cell phone ringing can be annoying.
    It’s even worse when the cell phone won’t stop ringing and the owner won’t answer it. Jean (Kate Ramsey) found herself in that very situation in Los Alamos Little Theater’s presentation of “Dead Man’s Cell Phone,” directed by Gwen Lewis and produced by David Schiferl.
    Gordon (Eric Björklund) wouldn’t answer his phone. Not because he didn’t want to, but rather because he couldn’t. He was dead. He also happened to be sitting next to Jean in a café, while they were lunching. After unsuccessfully trying to talk to him, her response to silence the annoying contraption was to answer it. What happened after that was a bit strange.
    The cell phone became a part of her life. It constantly rang and she constantly answered it, even though she did not know the people on the other end. No matter where she was or what she was doing, she answered the phone.

  • Do the Arts Crawl downtown Oct. 5

    On Oct. 5, four different organizations will keep their doors open into the evening to provide an inside view of the arts community.
    Mesa Public Library Art Gallery at 2400 Central Ave. celebrates the opening of “Unmute,” a traveling exhibition that explores the theme of how text and image developed new relationships in 20th century art, from 4-5:30 p.m.
    The exhibition includes many examples of artist’s books, but also other works in a wide range of media.
    “Unmute”  is an exhibition of works on paper from the permanent collection of the University Art Gallery at New Mexico State University that question the assumptions about the relationship of language and image in visual art.
    It explores in depth what happens when artists indulge the fundamental impulse to breach the supposed boundaries between the verbal and the visual.
    Also from 4-5:30 p.m., the Los Alamos Historical Society,1050 Bathtub Row, will feature photographs of Manhattan Project veteran Jack Aeby, who took the only known color photo of the world’s first atomic blast at Trinity Site. Their permanent exhibits feature all eras of Los Alamos history, including a section on post-war “Cold War” era Pacific testing, a domestic bomb shelter and more.

  • Unmute: Text and Images in American Art 1970-2000

    Mesa Public Library Art Gallery, with support from the Friends of Los Alamos County Libraries, will host a traveling exhibition that explores the theme of how text and image developed new relationships in 20th century art, including the closest form of that relationship, the artist’s book.
    The event is from 4-5:30 p.m. Oct. 5 and is part of the Arts Crawl Evening, which includes the Los Alamos Historical Museum, Fuller Lodge Art Center and Karen Wray Fine Art.
    The exhibition includes many examples of artist’s books but also other works in a wide range of media as well. Works by 52 artists, many of world renown, provide a strong showing of how text and image combine to make visually and intellectually compelling art. Sol Lewitt, Joyce Kozloff, Hans Haacke, Melissa Grimes, Jaune Quick to See Smith, Pat Steir, Carrie Mae Weems, to name a few, are among those artists whose work is included in the exhibit, one so fitting to be shown in a library. New Mexico institutions have treasures in their collections, a resource to share across the state and across institutional venues for all New Mexicans and visitors to enjoy.

  • NFL referees are back to work

    NEW YORK (AP) — The NFL's regular officiating crews are back. Their return couldn't have come soon enough for many players, coaches and fans.

    After two days of marathon negotiations — and mounting frustration throughout the league — the NFL and the officials' union announced at midnight Thursday that a tentative eight-year agreement had been reached to end a lockout that began in June.

    The deal came on the heels of Seattle's chaotic last-second win over Green Bay on Monday night in which the replacement officials struggled. Commissioner Roger Goodell, who was at the bargaining table Tuesday and Wednesday, said the regular officials would work the Browns-Ravens game at Baltimore on Thursday night.

    "We are glad to be getting back on the field for this week's games," NFL Referees Association president Scott Green said.

    And plenty of players echoed that sentiment.

    "Never thought I would be excited for the refs to come back to work but it's about time it was definitely necessary!" Cleveland return specialist Josh Cribbs tweeted Thursday morning.

    Minnesota punter Chris Kluwe chimed in, too.

  • 10 things to know for Thursday

    Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today (times in EDT):

    1. WHO'S COMING BACK TO THE FOOTBALL FIELD

    A tentative agreement between the NFL and referees' union will bring the regular officials back for tonight's game.

    2. NEXT UP AT THE U.N.

    A speech by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who has a history of fiery General Assembly addresses, will be closely watched.

    3. EARLY PREDICTIONS OF PROBLEMS WITH F-22 JETS

    The Associated Press obtained internal documents showing recommendations to address safety concerns were rejected by military officials reluctant to add costs.

    4. WHY ONE MAN'S MEDICAL NIGHTMARE MAY HELP MILLIONS

    A new discovery in his treatment could offer a simple way to personalize cancer care.

  • NFL refs back to work Thursday after deal--Video Extra

    NEW YORK (AP) — The NFL's regular officiating crews are back. Their return couldn't have come soon enough for many players, coaches and fans.

    After two days of marathon negotiations — and mounting frustration throughout the league — the NFL and the officials' union announced at midnight Thursday that a tentative eight-year agreement had been reached to end a lockout that began in June.

    The deal came on the heels of Seattle's chaotic last-second win over Green Bay on Monday night in which the replacement officials struggled. Commissioner Roger Goodell, who was at the bargaining table Tuesday and Wednesday, said the regular officials would work the Browns-Ravens game at Baltimore on Thursday night.

    "We are glad to be getting back on the field for this week's games," NFL Referees Association president Scott Green said.

    And plenty of players echoed that sentiment.

  • Today in History for September 27th
  • LA volleyball earns decisive win

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper volleyball team picked up an impressive victory against a solid Class 4A opponent Wednesday night at Griffith Gymnasium.

    The Hilltoppers trailed only brielfy on two occassions Wednesday as they rolled to a big 25-16, 25-14, 25-15 win over the Moriarty Pintos.

    Los Alamos had the better of Moriarty in virtually all facets of the match and its defense was able to neutralize Moriarty's Arianna Jacquez, one of the top hitters in Class 4A. Meanwhile, the Hilltopper hitters were on track throughout, paced by outside hitter Erin Kirk's 14 spike kills.

    More about the Hilltoppers' victory will be in Thursday's Los Alamos Monitor.

  • Main Hill Road closed for maintenance beginning Oct. 2

    Two miles of N.M. 502, the road to Los Alamos, will be closed for several hours each day beginning Tuesday, while pavement rehabilitation work is underway. The affected highway extends from mile marker 4, near the county line, to mile marker 6, near the White Rock turn-off.


    The New Mexico Department of Transportation (NMDOT) advises motorists to take the N.M. 4/East Jemez Road truck route to Los Alamos and the Los Alamos National Laboratory while road work is in progress.


    Crews will mill out two-and-a-half inches of existing pavement and repaving the road with new asphalt material to help rehabilitate the roadway.

    
According to NMDOT Maintenance Supervisor Kenny Gallegos, the repair has been a priority.

    
“It was part of our pavement preservation program for some time,” Gallegos said. “We prioritize our roads by pavement deterioration, and that section of the road is a perfect candidate.”


    The last time the road was resurfaced was in the summer of 2000, according to Gallegos. Since then, Gallegos said, water has seeped into cracks in the pavement, causing a lot of potholes in that particular area.


  • Dr: Lady Gaga's Movement 'Heartwarming' for Fans

    After receiving attention for gaining weight, Lady Gaga posted photos on social media with the caption 'bulimia and anorexia since I was 15.' The entertainer also announced an effort to encourage body acceptance.