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Today's News

  • Homeless S.C. Man Wins $200,000 Lottery

    Born and raised in Greenville, South Carolina, a homeless man now has a chance for a new home after winning $200,000 in a state lottery.

  • Today in History for October 21st
  • PRObE computer center opens

    According to high school student and PRObE Center volunteer Samuel Wang, this is kind of what a “supercomputer” is.

    “Imagine a supercomputer as a bunch of personal computers hooked up with several miles of cable to a massive server that’s fueled by a large power source,” he said.

    In other words, good luck in beating it at chess. Just like how the average computer used to take up several large rooms in the 1950s, those rooms are now reserved for the supercomputers, devices with so much memory and processing power behind them they are reserved for only the really big tasks, such as figuring out how to stop global warming, predicting the outcome of a world war and whatever else programmers may ask them to do.

    However, these machines do have a couple of weaknesses.

    Because of the way supercomputers are engineered, (miles of cable, made up of a lot of smaller computers, special cooling systems, etc.) they are sometimes very temperamental and can’t easily be made to switch tasks quickly like your personal computer can. Plus, once they are incorporated into a certain environment, these computers are usually relegated to doing whatever job it’s originally tasked with for rest of its working life.

  • Trail memorializes Satch Cowan

    When Helen (Satch) Dunham Cowan passed away in August of 2011, her husband George Cowan, thought the most suitable memorial would be a local hiking trail created and named in her honor.

    Monday, the newly created Satch Cowan Trail opens with a ribbon cutting ceremony.  Cowan was an avid hiker with a love of the outdoors.

    Friends such as Barbara Lemmick and Geffrey Howell raised $7,000 for the Satch Cowan Trail Fund, drew up a proposal and ushered it through numerous committees and board meetings to win council approval in a unanimous vote back in June.

    “There was great enthusiasm for this project from start to finish, first from the community and friends, and then all the committees that had to approve this and move it along to the final unanimous vote at county council; all were just tremendously supportive,” Lemmick said. “So even though it was a very long process, it was also a tremendously rewarding process.”

    Lemmick credits Los Alamos County Open Space Specialist Craig Martin for being instrumental in the creation of the trail.

  • HASC wants CMRR decision reassessed

    The deferred Chemistry Metallurgy Research Replacement project at LANL still has some fans in Washington.

    And most of them are on the House Armed Services Committee in addition to the Senate Armed Services Committee.

    According to the trade publication Nuclear Materials Monitor, the HASC is not ready to approve the National Nuclear Security Administration’s request to reprogram $120 million for an alternate plutonium strategy.

    In fact, the HASC is insistent that there should be widespread changes in management across the weapons complex.

    The trade publication and the Los Alamos Study Group obtained a letter from HASC Chairman Buck McKeon (R-Calif.) to DOE Deputy Chief Financial Officer Joanne Choi, which took offense with the decision to defer construction of the CMRR-NF. That decision prompted DOE to ask the government to reprogram funds to pursue an alternative plutonium strategy.

    In his letter, McKeon called the deferral “hasty” with “poorly understood” impacts that are based on “only the most rudimentary and preliminary analysis,” McKeon urged the Administration — “at the highest levels ”— to reassess the decision to defer the CMRR-NF and consider broader management reforms.

  • Update 10-21-12

    Chat with the Chief

    Police Chief Wayne Torpy will be in his office from 2-3 p.m. Monday and invites any member of the public to drop by and chat with him at the Police Department (next to the Justice Center at Ashley Pond).

    Trail dedication

    Residents are invited to attend the dedication ceremony for the new Satch Cowan Trail at 11 a.m. Monday at the trailhead near the existing Quemazon Trail in Western Area. 

    CRC committee

    Members of Charter Review Committee will be available at the Farmer’s Market to answer questions.  Join them between
    9:30-11:30 a.m. Committee members plan to meet with voters at the Farmer’s Market every Thursday between now and the day of the election.

    LDRD Day

    LANL will host its annual Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Day at 9:20 a.m. Tuesday at Buffalo Thunder Casino and Resort.

    County Council

    The Los Alamos County Council will hold a special session at 7 p.m. Tuesday in council chambers.

  • Early voting begins

    Early voting for the 2012 election opened Saturday at the Los Alamos Community Training Room and the White Rock Fire Station Training Room. Hours are from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. Early voting runs through Nov. 3.

  • Eastern Area 2 construction continues

    Construction of the Eastern Area 2 Concrete, Paving, and Utility Project Phase 1 continues. For the week of Oct. 22, expect concrete work to continue on Myrtle as well as on 5th Street.
    RMCI, the contractor, has to install multiple concrete valley gutters across 15th at Myrtle, across 11th Street at 15th, and on 9th at Canyon. When the contractor places the valley gutters, detours will be established until the concrete has cured.
    Paving operations will follow concrete work, with paving operations anticipated to begin no later than Oct. 29.
    Associated traffic control includes flagging operations on Myrtle during the day with two-way traffic at night. The detours for the installation of valley gutters will be announced as the work progresses. 5th Street remains closed and 9th between Myrtle and Canyon is also closed.
    The County Public Works Department staff would like to thank the public for their continued patience and cooperation throughout the duration of this project. Detailed project delay information is available on the County’s project website at losalamosnm.us/Projects.

  • United Way sets goal

    United Way of Northern New Mexico continues to reach out for donations and pledges from local communities and businesses for its campaign fundraiser, which began mid-September and continues through November.
    Executive Director Kristy Ortega wants to raise enough money to help all grant applicants. She set the campaign goal at $1,590,689 — the total requested amount of all 32 grant applicants. These nonprofit organizations have expressed a community need and United Way wants to meet that need. The focus of the campaign is to raise grant money for the United Way Community Action Fund. The grant program funded 24 local nonprofit organizations this spring (see list below). United Way asks for support by donating online at UnitedWayNNM.org, participating in your workplace campaign, completing a pledge form online, or attending a fundraising event.
    Upcoming campaign events include:
    • Hamburger Nite at The Hill Diner, 5 p.m. Oct. 29. Catered by the Hill Diner, 1315 Trinity Dr. Come dressed in costume.
    • Speakeasy Soiree at Dixie Girl Restaurant, Nov. 16.  A roaring ’20s benefit for United Way — sponsorship opportunities and tickets available. Contact Taylor Guskey at 662-1099 for more information.

  • More on ballot questions

    As part of the ballot for the November election, Los Alamos voters are being presented with proposed changes to the Initiative, Referendum and Recall provisions of the Charter, and the process for future Charter amendments.  We fully agree with the notion that changes to the Charter should only be made after thoughtful and deliberate consideration.  The Charter Review Committee provided that analysis after months of open and respectful dialogue.  We support the proposed changes and would like to offer our explanations for our concrete support.
    We begin by providing an explanation of the terms.  A citizen initiative is a means by which a petition signed by a certain minimum number of voters can require a public vote on a citizen proposed ordinance or charter amendment.  A referendum is a means by which a petition signed by a certain minimum number of voters can require a public vote to repeal an ordinance enacted by the Council. Both initiative and referendum processes are sometimes called “citizen directed legislation.” A recall is a procedure by which voters can remove an elected official from office through a direct vote before his or her term has ended.